The Full Wiki

Feeling: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Feeling is the nominalization of "to feel". The word was first used in the English language to describe the physical sensation of touch through either experience or perception. The word is also used to describe experiences, other than the physical sensation of touch, such as "a feeling of warmth".[1] In psychology, the word is usually reserved for the conscious subjective experience of emotion.[2] Phenomenology and heterophenomenology are philosophical approaches that provide some basis for knowledge of feelings. Many schools of psychotherapy depend on the therapist achieving some kind of understanding of the client's feelings, for which methodologies exist. Some theories of interpersonal relationships also have a role for shared feelings or understanding of another person's feelings.

Sensitive, sculpture by Miquel Blay (1910)

Perception of the physical world does not necessarily result in a universal reaction among receivers (see emotions), but varies depending on one's tendency to handle the situation, how the situation relates to the receiver's past experiences, and any number of other factors. Feelings are also known as a state of consciousness, such as that resulting from emotions, sentiments or desires.

Contents

Gut feeling

A gut feeling, or gut reaction, is a visceral emotional reaction to something, and often one of uneasiness. Gut feelings are generally regarded as not modulated by conscious thought. Gut feelings come from within, what your brain tells you to do. It also allow you to make a decision based on what your "gut" tells you to do.

The phrase "gut feeling" may also be used as a short-hand term for an individual's "common sense" perception of what is considered "the right thing to do"; such as: helping an injured passerby, avoiding dark alleys and generally acting in accordance with instinctive feelings about a given situation. It can also refer to simple common knowledge phrases which are true no matter when said, such as "Water is wet", "Fire is hot", or to ideas that an individual intuitively regards as true, without proof (see "Truthiness" for examples).

Gut feelings, like all reflexive unconscious comparisons, can be re-programmed by practice or experience.

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ feeling - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education
  2. ^ VandenBos, Gary (2006) APA Dictionary of Psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association

External links

Advertisements

Study guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Emotion article)

From Wikiversity

Basic emotions

Search

Wikipedia-logo.png Run a search on Emotion at Wikipedia.
Commons-logo.svg Search Wikimedia Commons for images, sounds and other media related to: Emotion
Wikimedia-logo.svg Search for Emotion on the following projects:
Smiley green alien whatface.svg Lost on Wikiversity? Please help by choosing project boxes to classify this resource by:
  • subject
  • educational level
  • resource type

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message