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1 : 1 mixture (racemate)
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(RS)-6-chloro-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol
Identifiers
CAS number 67227-57-0
ATC code C01CA19
PubChem 3341
DrugBank APRD00969
ChemSpider 3224
Chemical data
Formula C16H16ClNO3
Mol. mass 305.76 g/mol
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism Hepatic (CYP not involved)
Half life 5 minutes
Excretion Renal (90%) and fecal (10%)
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat. B
Legal status
Routes IV
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Fenoldopam (Corlopam) is a drug and synthetic benzazepine derivative which acts as a peripheral selective D1 receptor weak partial agonist/antagonist and is used as an antihypertensive.[1]

Contents

Indications

Fenoldopam is used as an antihypertensive agent postoperatively, and also via IV to treat hypertensive crisis.[2]

Pharmacology

By activating peripheral D1 receptors, fenoldopam causes arterial/arteriolar vasodilation leading to a decrease in blood pressure. It is particularly effective in dilating the renal, mesenteric, and coronary arteries, where D1.receptors are found.[2] It decreases afterload and also through specific dopamine receptors along the nephron promoting sodium excretion.[citation needed]

Side effects

Adverse effects include headache, flushing, angina, hypotension, reflex tachycardia, and increased intraocular pressure.[2]

References

  1. ^ Oliver WC, Nuttall GA, Cherry KJ, Decker PA, Bower T, Ereth MH (October 2006). "A comparison of fenoldopam with dopamine and sodium nitroprusside in patients undergoing cross-clamping of the abdominal aorta". Anesth. Analg. 103 (4): 833–40. doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000237273.79553.9e. PMID 17000789. http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17000789. 
  2. ^ a b c Shen, Howard (2008). Illustrated Pharmacology Memory Cards: PharMnemonics. Minireview. p. 9. ISBN 1-59541-101-1. 
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