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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

'ang pagkakaroon ng maraming kalaguyoFidelity' is the quality of being faithful or loyal. Its original meaning regarded duty to a lord or a king, in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. Both derive from the Latin word fidēlis (A III adjective), meaning "faithful or loyal"

In modern human relationships, the term can refer to sexual monogamy. In western culture this often means adherence to marriage vows, or of promises of exclusivity or monogamy, and an absence of adultery. However, some people do not equate fidelity in personal relationships with sexual or emotional monogamy. (For example, see polyamory and Open marriage.) Often, however, females in Shakespeare are associated with it in a negative sense, such as "She is with little fidelity". For example, Bertram accuses Helena of having "little fidelity" in All's Well That Ends Well.

Fidelity also denotes how accurate a copy is to its source. For example, a worn gramophone record will have a lower fidelity than one in good condition, and a recording made by a low budget record company in the early 20th century is likely to have significantly less audio fidelity than a good modern recording. In the 1950s, the terms "high fidelity" or "hi-fi" were popularized for equipment and recordings designed for more accurate sound reproduction, while "lo-fi" music aims for "authenticity" over perfect production. Similarly in electronics, fidelity refers to the correspondence of the output signal to the input signal, rather than sound.

In the fields of scientific modelling and simulation, fidelity refers to the degree to which a model or simulation reproduces the state and behaviour of a real world object, feature or condition. Fidelity is therefore a measure of the realism of a model or simulation[1]. Simulation fidelity has also been described in the past as 'degree of similarity'[2].

The computer age has spawned the term Wi-Fi in reference to certain groups of wireless electronic devices. While the term Wi-Fi has been popularly taken to be an abbreviation of 'wireless fidelity', Wi-Fi is in fact a commercial brand owned by the Wi-Fi Alliance, and has nothing to do with fidelity as a concept.

In the field of program evaluation, the term fidelity denotes how closely a set of procedures were implemented as they were supposed to have been. For example, it's difficult to draw conclusions from a study about formative assessment in school classrooms if the teachers are not able or willing to follow the procedures they received in training.[3]

References

  1. ^ "SISO-REF-002-1999: Fidelity Implementation Study Group Report". http://www.sisostds.org/index.php?tg=fileman&idx=get&id=5&gr=Y&path=SISO+Products%2FSISO+Reference+Products&file=99S-SIW-167.doc. 
  2. ^ Hays, R.; Singer, M. (1989). Simulation fidelity in training system design: Bridging the gap between reality and training. Springer-Verlag. 
  3. ^ O’Donnell, Carol (2008). "Defining, Conceptualizing, and Measuring Fidelity of Implementation and Its Relationship to Outcomes in K–12 Curriculum Intervention Research". Review of Educational Research, Vol. 78, No. 1, 33-84 DOI: 10.3102/0034654307313793. http://rer.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/78/1/33. Retrieved March 6, 2010. 

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Fidelity, or faithfulness, is a notion that, at its most abstract level, implies a truthful connection to a source or sources. Its original meaning dealt with loyalty and attentiveness to one's duty to a lord or a king, in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. Both derive from the Latin word fidēlis (A III adjective), meaning "faithful or loyal".

Sourced

  • This was her finest role and the hardest one to play. Choosing between heaven and a ridiculous fidelity, preferring oneself to eternity or losing oneself in God is the age-old tragedy in which each must play his part.
  • The joker in the deck of lesbian fidelity is female vanity: no woman of fifty is going to undress in front of a woman of twenty no matter how much she might lust for her.
  • There is something in the unselfish and self-sacrificing love of a brute, which goes directly to the heart of him who has had frequent occasion to test the paltry friendship and gossamer fidelity of mere Man.
  • Histories are more full of Examples of the Fidelity of dogs than of Friends.

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)

Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).

  • Never do what you cannot ask Christ to bless; and never go into any place or any pursuit in which you cannot ask Christ Jesus to go with you.
  • Be but faithful, that is all;
    Go right on, and close behind thee
    There shall follow still and find thee
    Help, sure help.
  • Only be steadfast, never waver,
    Nor seek earth's favor,
    But rest;
    Thou knowest what God wills must be
    For all His creatures — so for thee —
    The best.
    • Paul Fleming, p. 248.
  • Oh! it irradiates all our days with lofty beauty, and it makes them all hallowed and divine, when we feel that not the apparent greatness, not the prominence nor noise with which it is done, nor the external consequences which flow from it, but the motive from which it flowed, determines the worth of our deed in God's eyes. Faithfulness is faithfulness, on whatsoever scale it be set forth.
  • Let it be ours to be self-reliant amidst hosts of the vacillating — real in a generation of triflers — true amongst a multitude of shams; when tempted to swerve from principle, sturdy as an oak in its maintenance; when solicited by the enticement of sinners, firm as a rock in our denial.
  • If, after an absolute consecration to Him, and a conviction in conscience that He requires something of us, we hesitate, delay, lose courage, dilute what He would have us do, indulge fear for our comfort or safety, desire to shield ourselves from suffering and obloquy, or seek to find some excuse for not performing a difficult or painful duty, we are truly guilty in His sight.
  • Oh! it irradiates all our days with lofty beauty, and it makes them all hallowed and divine, when we feel that not the apparent greatness, not the prominence nor noise with which it is done, nor the external consequences which flow from it, but the motive from which it flowed, determines the worth of our deed in God's eyes. Faithfulness is faithfulness, on whatsoever scale it be set forth.
  • Only be steadfast, never waver,
    Nor seek earth's favor,
    But rest;
    Thou knowest what God wills must be
    For all His creatures — so for thee —
    The best.
    • Paul Fleming, p. 249.
  • If, after an absolute consecration to Him, and a conviction in conscience that He requires something of us, we hesitate, delay, lose courage, dilute what He would have us do, indulge fear for our comfort or safety, desire to shield ourselves from suffering and obloquy, or seek to find some excuse for not performing a difficult or painful duty, we are truly guilty in His sight.
  • Believing on Christ, learning of Christ, following Christ, — this is what it is to be a Christian. You must believe on Him that you may learn of Him. You must learn of Him that you may follow Him. But believing is nothing, and learning is less than nothing, if they do not result in faithful following.
  • The secret of all our dryness, the root of all our weakness, our want of fruit and progress, our dearth and desolation, is, that we do not follow Christ. First, we do not believe that He has any particular care of us, or personal interest in our lives, and then, falling away at that point from His lead, we drop into ourselves, to do a few casual works of duty, in which neither we nor others are greatly blessed.
  • There are two paths in which the Christian follows Christ in this world, — paths which are always parallel, and which often merge into one, — the path of integrity, and the path of benevolence. In doing right and in doing good the Christian is a follower of Christ.
  • It sweetens every bit of work to think that I am doing it in humble, far-off, yet real imitation of Jesus.
  • Get into sympathy with Jesus. Seek His presence, seek His help. And walking through the world in His company, you will be as balm in the bleakest weather, a benediction in the wildest scene.
    • James Hamilton, p. 250.
  • God never gave a man a thing to do concerning which it were irreverent to ponder how the Son of God would have done it.
  • It is a good thing to follow Jesus with our eyes open. That is walking both by sight and faith. But it is better to follow Jesus blindly than not to follow at all.
    • Henry Clay Trumbull, p. 251.
  • If washed in Jesus' blood,
    Then bear His likeness too,
    And as you onward press
    Ask, "What would Jesus do?"
  • Precious Saviour! glorious Forerunner! oh, give us grace to follow Thee; and whenever tempted to relax our efforts, or loiter on our journey, or complain of the way, may we remember that Thou hast traveled every step of the way before us, and art now waiting to welcome us into Thy presence and glory.
  • When the fight thickens the captain says, "Steady, boys;" and it is their steadiness which pulls the soldiers through. Fitful soldiers are rarely useful ones. That is our great need to-day, steady Christians — men and women you can count on. Many Christians are like intermittent springs. They flow to-day — to-morrow you cannot get a thimbleful of religious activity out of the dried channel of their lives.
    • Francis Wayland, p. 248.
  • When the fight thickens the captain says, " Steady, boys;" and it is their steadiness which pulls the soldiers through. Fitful soldiers are rarely useful ones. That is our great need to-day, steady Christians — men and women you can count on. Many Christians are like intermittent springs. They flow to-day — to-morrow you cannot get a thimbleful of religious activity out of the dried channel of their lives.
    • Francis Wayland, p. 249.

External links

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Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Fidelity
by William Wordsworth
"Fidelity," by William Wordsworth (1770-1850), is placed here out of respect to a boy of eleven years who liked the poem well enough to recite it frequently. The scene is laid on Helvellyn, to me the most impressive mountain of the Lake District of England. Wordsworth is a part of this country. I once heard John Burroughs say: "I went to the Lake District to see what kind of a country it could be that would produce a Wordsworth."

    A barking sound the Shepherd hears,
    A cry as of a dog or fox;
    He halts--and searches with his eyes
    Among the scattered rocks;
    And now at distance can discern
    A stirring in a brake of fern;
    And instantly a Dog is seen,
    Glancing through that covert green.

    The Dog is not of mountain breed;
    Its motions, too, are wild and shy;
    With something, as the Shepherd thinks,
    Unusual in its cry:
    Nor is there any one in sight
    All round, in hollow or on height;
    Nor shout, nor whistle strikes his ear;
    What is the Creature doing here?

    It was a cove, a huge recess,
    That keeps, till June, December's snow.
    A lofty precipice in front,
    A silent tarn below!
    Far in the bosom of Helvellyn,
    Remote from public road or dwelling,
    Pathway, or cultivated land;
    From trace of human foot or hand.

    There sometimes doth a leaping fish
    Send through the tarn a lonely cheer;
    The crags repeat the raven's croak,
    In symphony austere;
    Thither the rainbow comes--the cloud--
    And mists that spread the flying shroud;
    And sunbeams; and the sounding blast,
    That, if it could, would hurry past,
    But that enormous barrier binds it fast.

    Not free from boding thoughts, a while
    The Shepherd stood: then makes his way
    Toward the Dog, o'er rocks and stones,
    As quickly as he may;
    Nor far had gone, before he found
    A human skeleton on the ground;
    The appalled discoverer with a sigh
    Looks round, to learn the history.

    From those abrupt and perilous rocks
    The Man had fallen, that place of fear!
    At length upon the Shepherd's mind
    It breaks, and all is clear:
    He instantly recalled the name,
    And who he was, and whence he came;
    Remembered, too, the very day
    On which the traveller passed this way.

    But hear a wonder, for whose sake
    This lamentable tale I tell!
    A lasting monument of words
    This wonder merits well.
    The Dog, which still was hovering nigh,
    Repeating the same timid cry,
    This Dog had been through three months space
    A dweller in that savage place.

    Yes, proof was plain that, since the day
    When this ill-fated traveller died,
    The Dog had watched about the spot,
    Or by his master's side:
    How nourished here through such long time
    He knows, who gave that love sublime;
    And gave that strength of feeling, great
    Above all human estimate.








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