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Coordinates: 56°15′00″N 3°12′00″W / 56.25°N 3.2°W / 56.25; -3.2

Fife
Fìobha
Fife
Location
Fife council.PNG
Geography
Area Ranked 13th
 - Total 1,325 km2 (512 sq mi)
Admin HQ Glenrothes
ISO 3166-2 GB-FIF
ONS code 00QR
Demographics
Population Ranked 3rd
 - Total (2008) 361,900
 - Density 273 /km2 (707 /sq mi)
Politics
Fife Council
Fife Council Crest.jpg
http://www.fife.gov.uk/
Control Scottish National Party/Liberal Democrat
MPs Gordon Brown
Sir Menzies Campbell QC
Willie Rennie
Lindsay Roy
MSPs Scott Barrie
Helen Eadie
Marilyn Livingstone
Tricia Marwick
Iain Smith
Jim Tolson

Fife (Scots: Fife, Scottish Gaelic: Fìobha) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. It was originally one of the Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland.

It is a lieutenancy area, and was a county of Scotland until 1975. It was very occasionally known by the anglification Fifeshire in old documents and maps compiled by English cartographers and authors. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer.

Fife was a local government region divided into three districtsDunfermline, Kirkcaldy and North-East Fife. Since 1996 the functions of the district councils have been exercised by the unitary Fife Council.

Fife is Scotland's third largest local authority area by population. It has a resident population of just under 360,000, almost a third of whom live in the three principal towns of Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes. Kirkcaldy has Fife's largest population (48,108 in 2006).

The historic town of St Andrews is located on the east coast of Fife. It is well known for one of the most ancient universities in Europe, and as the home of golf.

Contents

History

Legend has it that upon the death of Cruithne, the Pictish realm – known collectively as "Pictavia" – was divided into seven sub-kingdoms or provinces, one of which became Fife. The name is recorded as Fib in A.D. 1150 and Fif in 1165. It was often associated with Fothriff.

Fife, bounded to the north by the Firth of Tay and to the south by the Firth of Forth, is a natural peninsula whose political boundaries have changed little over the ages.

King James VI of Scotland described Fife as a "beggar's mantle fringed with gold" – the golden fringe being the coast and its chain of little ports with their thriving fishing fleets and rich trading links with the Low Countries, ironic given the much later development of farming on some of Scotland's richest soil and the minerals, notably coal, underneath. Wool, linen, coal and salt were all traded. Salt pans heated by local coal were a feature of the Fife coast in the past. The distinctive red clay "pan tiles" seen on many old buildings in Fife arrived as ballast on trading boats and replaced the previously thatched roofs.

In 1598 King James VI employed a group of 12 men from Fife, who became known as the Fife adventurers, to colonise the Isle of Lewis in an attempt to begin the "civilisation" and anglicisation of the region. This endeavour lasted until 1609 when the colonists, having been opposed by the native population, were bought out by Coinneach, the clan chief of the MacKenzies.

Historically, there was much heavy industry in the century or so following the Victorian engineering triumphs of the Forth and Tay rail bridges. The Fife coalfields were developed around Kirkcaldy and the west of Fife, reaching far out under the Firth of Forth. Shipbuilding was famous at Methil and Rosyth. The world centre for linoleum production was in Kirkcaldy (where it is still produced), and flax grown in Fife was transformed into linen locally too. Post-war Fife saw the development of Scotland's second new town, Glenrothes. Originally to be based around a coal mine, the town eventually attracted a high number of modern Silicon Glen companies to the region. Fife Council also centered its operations in Glenrothes.

There are notable historical buildings in Fife, some of which are managed by the National Trust for Scotland or Historic Scotland. They include Dunfermline Abbey (the last resting place of Scottish royalty), the palace in Culross, Ravenscraig Castle in Kirkcaldy, Dysart Harbour area, Balgonie Castle near Coaltown of Balgonie, Falkland Palace (hunting palace of the Scottish Kings), Kellie Castle near Pittenweem, Hill of Tarvit (a historical house), St Andrews Castle (with a gruesome bottle dungeon), St Andrews Cathedral and St Rules' Tower.

Governance

Fife House, seat of Fife Council

The county of Fife is represented by five Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) and four Members of Parliament (MPs) who are sent to Holyrood and Westminster respectively. As of November 2007, two of the MPs constituencies are held by Labour (Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath, represented by Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and Glenrothes) and the other two by Liberal Democrats (Dunfermline West and North East Fife).[1] Two of the MSPs constituencies are held by Labour (Kirkcaldy and Dunfermline East) with another two by Liberal Democrats (Dunfermline West and North East Fife) and one by Scottish National Party (Central Fife).[2]

The headquarters of Fife Council is based in Glenrothes. Council meetings take place in Fife House (formerly known as Glenrothes House) in the town centre. The west wing of the building was built by the Glenrothes Development Corporation (GDC) as their offices in 1969, which was later used as the headquarters of Fife Regional Council.[3] Since the last Scottish election in 2007, Fife Council has been run as a joint SNP/Liberal Democrat coalition, claiming a total of 44 seats together. Peter Grant was elected leader of Fife Council. Labour and the other parties form the opposition.[4]

Geography

Fife is a peninsula in eastern Scotland bordered on the north by the Firth of Tay, on the east by the North Sea and the Firth of Forth to the south. The route to the west is partially blocked by the mass of the Ochil Hills. Almost all road traffic into and out of Fife has to pass over one of three bridges, south on the Forth Road Bridge, west on the Kincardine Bridge or north-east via the Tay Road Bridge, the exception being traffic headed north on the M90. Tolls were abolished on the Tay Road Bridge and Forth Road Bridge on 11 February 2008.

There are extinct volcanic features, such as the Lomond Hills which rise above rolling farmland, and Largo Law, a volcanic plug in the east. At 522 m (or 1713 feet), the West Lomond is the highest point in Fife. The coast has fine but small harbours, from the industrial docks in Burntisland and Rosyth to the fishing villages of the East Neuk such as Anstruther and Pittenweem. The large area of flat land to the north of the Lomond Hills, through which the River Eden flows, is known as the Howe of Fife.

Looking across the farmland of North East Fife to the distant Lomond Hills

North of the Lomond Hills can be found villages and small towns in a primarily agricultural landscape. The areas in the south and west of Fife, including the towns of Dunfermline, Glenrothes, Kirkcaldy and the Levenmouth region are lightly industrial and more densely populated. The only area which could claim to be heavily industrial is Rosyth, around the naval dockyard.

The east corner of Fife, generally that east of a line between Leven and St Andrews is recognised throughout Scotland as the "East Neuk" (or corner) of Fife, small settlements around sheltered harbours, with distinctive vernacular "Dutch" or craw (crow) stepped gabled and stone-built architecture – an area much sought after as second homes of the Edinburgh professional classes since the Forth Road Bridge was built. The fishing industry on which the East Neuk settlements were built has declined in recent years with the main fishing fleet now operating from Pittenweem and the harbour in Anstruther being used as a marina for pleasure craft.

Towns and villages

Cupar took over as county town from Crail in the early 13th century. This has since been transferred to Glenrothes with the decision to locate the headquarters of the newly established Fife Regional Council in 1975. The county has three main towns – Kirkcaldy, Dunfermline and Glenrothes. According to the 2006 estimate, Kirkcaldy is the largest settlement with a population of 48,108.[5] The largest settlement in terms of area is Glenrothes.

Culture

Fife is home to 4,961 listed buildings and 48 conservation areas.[6] Domestic sites of importance include Falkland Palace, Kellie Castle, St Andrews Castle and Kirkcaldy's Ravenscraig Castle. Fife is home to a number of ecclesiastical sites of historical interest. St Andrews Cathedral was home of the powerful Archbishopric of St Andrews, and later became a centre of the Scottish Reformation, while Dunfermline Abbey was the last resting place of a number of Scottish kings. Balmerino and Culross abbeys were both founded in the thirteenth century by the Cistercians, while a century before Lindores Abbey was founded by the Tironensians outside of Newburgh: all were highly important sites.

The Stanza Poetry Festival and Fife Festival of Music are events of national cultural importance. The Byre Theatre in St Andrews and Adam Smith Theatre in Kirkcaldy are both highly regarded as touring venues, the latter also being the home of the grand opera company Fife Opera.

Notable Fifers

Sports

St Andrews in Fife is the home of golf, being the town in which the sport was invented, and the Royal & Ancient Golf Club still has responsibility for overseeing the rules of the game today.

As for senior sports teams, in football, Dunfermline Athletic and Raith Rovers play in Division One; East Fife in Division Two; and Cowdenbeath in Division Three.

Fife Flyers are the UK's oldest ice hockey club and play in the Northern Premier League.

Fife is also home to seven rugby union clubs, Dunfermline RFC, Fife Southern RFC, based in Rosyth, Glenrothes RFC, Howe of Fife RFC, based in Cupar, Kirkcaldy RFC,madras rfc,waid academy rfc and one rugby league club, Fife Lions.

Media

Locally published newspapers include the Fife Free Press in Kirkcaldy; the Dunfermline Press in Dunfermline; the Glenrothes Gazette in Glenrothes; and the St Andrews Citizen in St Andrews. DC Thompson publishes North East Fife and South Fife Editions of the Dundee Courier & Advertiser, and the Counties Edition of the Evening Telegraph is sold in Fife. On the east coast of fife The East Fife Mail is also sold.

The only Fife-based radio stations are Kingdom FM and VRN, although local radio stations Radio Tay and Edinburgh's 97.3 Forth One broadcast to the northern and southern parts of the county respectively.

See also

References

External links

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

For other places with the same name, see Fife (disambiguation).

Fife is a county in the north east of Scotland.

Regions

"The Kingdom of Fife" [1] consists of a number of towns, countryside and coastline. Fife can be thought of in an number of sub-areas:

West Fife includes areas from Kincardine to Aberdour, including the ancient capital of Scotland, Dunfermline, as well as many historic towns and villages such as Culross and Limekilns.

Central Fife includes the areas around Cowdenbeath, Lochgelly, Kirkcaldy, Leven and Glenrothes.

North Fife includes areas around St Andrews, Leuchars, Cupar and villages along the Tay, as well as the farmland valleys of the Howe of Fife.

Crail Harbour
Crail Harbour

The East Neuk of Fife (pronounced like "nuke") is the coastal stretch beyond Leven leading up to St Andrews taking in villages such as St Monans (with its windmill), Elie (with its Blue Flag beach) and Crail (with its red tile roofs).

Many tourists find themselves paying most attention to St Andrews and The East Neuk. Falkland and Culross are also well worth visiting, and other areas provide facilities and subjects of interest: for example, Kirkcaldy is the birth place of Adam Smith - the "father of modern economics".

Map of Fife
Map of Fife
  • Aberdour, described as "the jewel in Fife", Aberdour is a stunningly attractive coastal village.
  • Anstruther
  • Buckhaven
  • Burntisland, a small town on the Firth of Forth.
  • Culross, a charming 16th and 17th century restored town.
  • Cupar
  • Dunfermline near the Forth Bridges, with an interesting Abbey.
  • Drumoig
  • Falkland
  • Glenrothes
  • Kirkcaldy
  • Leven
  • Lundin Links
  • St Andrews home of golf and oldest university in Scotland (founded 1410)

Understand

While Fife is often looked upon now as little more than the southern commuter belt to Edinburgh and the town of St. Andrews its people are very proud of their past. Fife has a history steeped in Economic achievement - from it's founder father, Adam Smith (born in Kirkcaldy) to perhaps the world's greatest buisnessman/philathropest, Andrew Carnegie (born in Dunfermline). This current tradition is upheld by the current UK Prime Minister, Gordon Brown.

Talk

The major language (as in the rest of Scotland) is English, but the Fife acccent can be difficult to understand (for those not used to the variety of accent in the UK, and not as difficult as some areas of Scotland). Many people, as in much of the rest of Scotland, use a form of English known as 'Lallans' or Lowlands English which does include some words that you may not be used to (for example "aye" for "yes" or "ken" for "know").

"Braw" is used locally as a word for general approval that you may be unfamiliar with (even having experience with speaking to Scottish people). As in "That'd be braw" meaning "That'd be fine/great", or simply "Braw!" meaning "Great!" or "OK!".

However, you need fear not! Speaking (standard/normal/American/Australian/English) "English" will not make you incomprehensible to Fifers, and Fifers will generally try to make themselves understood to you if you have problems with the dialect (I wouldn't push it too far in a pub later on in the evening, however).

As with the rest of the UK do not expect foreign language capability to be great, or even good (with the possible exception of areas such as St Andrews where the people are more used to tourists). Most people are educated in French or German, some in Spanish or Italian, but generally not to a conversational level (that they remember!). There are, of course, exceptions to this rule.

Get in

By plane

Edinburgh Airport [2] (EDI) is the most convenient airport for most of Fife. Edinburgh airport is well served from across the UK and some European cities by the likes of BA, BMI, easyJet, flyglobespan, flybe, Scotairways, Lufthansa, Air France and KLM, and now also has direct flights to the USA with Delta and Continental. There's a bus service (747 line [3]) direct to Inverkeithing from the airport, where you can change for another bus or for the train. It takes from 25 to 45 minutes (depending on the traffic). Fares are £4.50 single or "day return", half for children. Otherwise, get the bus/taxi into Edinburgh and catch the train from Haymarket or Waverley. You could of course also hire a car.

Glasgow airport is about a 90 minute drive from the Forth Road Bridge (entryway to Fife).

There is also a small airport in Dundee that has commercial scheduled connections from London City (with Scotairways) - this airport is convenient for some of Fife also. Fife Airport [4] is found in Glenrothes - there are no commercial scheduled flights to this airport.

By train

Trains from Edinburgh (or further south) to Dundee (or Aberdeen) stop at Inverkeithing, Aberdour, Burntisland, Kirkcaldy, Markinch and Leuchars (for St Andrews). You can use the GNER service on the East Coast Mainline directly from London to Kirkcaldy, though this is a long trip. There is also a very good local or 'circle' service which services Dunfermline, Rosyth, Thornton (for Glenrothes, although Markinch is also handy) and other towns.

By car

Use the M90 motorway to access Fife from the north (Perth) or south (Edinburgh). A92 gives access from Dundee/Aberdeen. Also easy access from Stirling to Kincardine/Dunfermline via A985. A92/A985/A91 are major trunk routes through Fife.

By bus

Major bus stations in Kirkcaldy, Dunfermline, Glenrothes, St Andrews and Cupar are served by Stagecoach among others (for example, some Megabus services make stops at Inverkeithing). See above for details of getting to Fife by bus from Edinburgh airport.

Get around

Roads are in generally good condition and not too crowded. The only motorway (the M90) passes straight through Fife, and the dual carriageway network is limited - so only drive if you feel comfortable on single carriageway roads, and some even smaller roads. To get around most areas (including to get to St Andrews) you will need to take trunk roads and through towns. Many of these towns have traffic calming schemes in place that can be difficult to negotiate (for example in Colinsburgh) or have through roads that are very narrow (or have parking on one side) where traffic can only really pass in one direction at a time (for example in Kingskettle). Don't let this put you off, though - take your time and remember to drive on the left (keep yourself as driver and the steering wheel towards the center of the road at all times, just as at home!) and you can see some of the best parts of Fife - the North Fife Tourist trail through the East Neuk is a fantastic route to drive to St Andrews, stopping in the picturesque villages en route. Falkland has some bad blind corners, so take care.

Generally speaking, the most convenient way to get from Edinburgh (Airport) to St Andrews is to hire a car and drive - especially if you're arriving with golf clubs!

Check Traveline Scotland [5] for full details of public transport and a journey planner.

Bus and rail services are excellent (the 'Fife Circular' service runs from Edinburgh Waverley to all train stations in West and Central Fife. The main line service runs to Inverkeithing in West Fife, Kirkcaldy in East Fife and Leucars in North East Fife.)

There is an excellent series of cycle tracks [6] throughout Fife. The cycle route from Edinburgh to Aberdeen also passes through Fife.

On foot you can take the Coastal Path [7] which starts (and ends) at the Kincardine, Tay or Forth Road Bridges.

See

St Andrews: home of golf and oldest university in Scotland (founded 1410)

Kirkcaldy

Culross

Secret Bunker: a former underground nuclear bunker now open to the public.

East Neuk: charming, photogenic fishing villages (includes Elie - with a blue flag beach, Pittenweem, Crail and Anstruther).

Kirkcaldy Museum and Art Gallery.

Falkland Palace

Dunfermline

Adam Smith Theatre

Rothes Halls

  • MacDuff Castle.  edit

Do

Get on your bike and enjoy the marvellous cycle routes

Visit the county's many fine parks (Beveridge in Kirkcaldy, Pittencrieff in Dunfermline, Lochore Meadows, etc).

Hut by Crail harbour
Hut by Crail harbour

The Bengal Tiger Indian Restaurant at Pittencrieff Street, Dunfermline, near to the park, offers excellent food, and has special half price offers every Sunday to Friday night inclusive.

For Fish & Chips (or Ice Cream!) try the Anstruther Fish Bar [8], which has won awards. Be ready for a long queue at busy times, though.

The Pavilion [9] in Elie is actually a (golf) pavillion, but offers good food (including local seafood) at a decent price. It's also an Internet Cafe.

If you're more adventurous, try lobster directly by the harbour in Crail (look for the small wooden hut).

Drink

Fife has many pubs: The Alpha Bar in Kirkcaldy; The Valleyfield Bar in High Valleyfield; Shardays in Lochgelly all offer a truly local experience.

The Stag Inn in Falkland is a nice pub with a pubby atmosphere. Cash only!

  • The Harbour Bar, High Street, Kirkcaldy. Fife's only pub with a micro brewery and a former winner of CAMRA's Scottish pub of the year and U.K. runner-up.  edit

Stay safe

Crime in Fife is low, and serious assaults are uncommon. As always, it makes sense to avoid badly lit areas at night, especially in large towns, even though there is a slim chance of crime. Fife is served by an excellent police service.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Database error article)

From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also fife
See also Fifer

Contents

English

Proper noun

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Fife

  1. A traditional county of Scotland now a Unitary Authority, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of effi
  • fief

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Allan James Fife article)

From Wikispecies

(1951- )

External links


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
Fife Council
Fìobh
Location
File:Fife council.PNG
Geography
Area Ranked 13th
 - Total 1,325 km²
 - % Water 1%
Admin HQ Glenrothes
ISO 3166-2 GB-FIF
ONS code 00QR
Demographics
Population Ranked 3rd
 - Total (2006) 358,900
 - Density 271 / km²
Scottish Gaelic
 - Total () N/A
Politics
Fife Council
File:Fife Council Crest.jpg
http://www.fife.gov.uk/
Control Scottish National Party/Liberal Democrat
MPs Gordon Brown
Sir Menzies Campbell QC
John William MacDougall
Willie Rennie
MSPs Scott Barrie
Helen Eadie
Marilyn Livingstone
Tricia Marwick
Iain Smith
Jim Tolson
Scotland

Fife (Gaelic: Fìobh) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. It was originally one of the Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland.

It is a lieutenancy area, and was a county of Scotland until 1975. It was very occasionally known by the anglification Fifeshire in old documents and maps compiled by English cartographers and authors. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer.

From 1975 to 1996 Fife was a local government region divided into three districtsDunfermline, Kirkcaldy and North-East Fife. Since 1996 the functions of the district councils have been exercised by the unitary Fife Council.

Fife is Scotland's 3rd largest local authority area with a resident population of just over 350,000. Almost a third of the population live in the three principal towns of Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes.

The historical town of St Andrews is located on the east coast of Fife. It is well known for one of the most ancient universities in Europe, and as the home of golf.

Contents

History

Popularly known as 'The Kingdom of Fife', Fife probably takes its name from Fibh, a 7th century Pictish king. Fibh was one of the seven sons of Cruithne, a warrior king who ruled over a wide area of ancient Scotland.

Legend has it that upon the death of Cruithne, the Pictish realm - known collectively as 'Pictavia' - was divided into seven sub-kingdoms or provinces, one of which became Fife. The name is recorded as Fib in 1150 and Fif in 1165. It was often associated with Fothriff.

Fife, bounded to the north by the Firth of Tay and to the south by the Firth of Forth, is a natural peninsula whose political boundaries have changed little over the ages.

King James VI of Scotland described Fife as a 'beggar's mantle fringed with gold' - the golden fringe being the coast and its chain of little ports with their thriving fishing fleets and rich trading links with the Low Countries, ironic given the much later development of farming on some of Scotland's richest soil and the minerals, notably coal underneath. Wool,linen, coal and salt were all traded. Salt pans heated by local coal were a feature of the Fife coast in the past.The distinctive red clay "pan tiles" seen on many old buildings in Fife arrived as ballast on trading boats and replaced the previously thatched roofs.

Historically, there was much heavy industry in the century or so following the Victorian engineering triumphs of the Forth and Tay rail bridges, The Fife coalfields were developed around Kirkcaldy and the west of Fife reaching far out under the Firth of Forth. Shipbuilding was famous at Methil and Rosyth. The world centre for linoleum production was in Kirkcaldy (where it is still produced), and flax grown in Fife was transformed into linen locally too. Post-war Fife saw the development of Scotlands second new town, Glenrothes. Originally to be based around a coal mine the town eventually attracted a high number of modern Silicon Glen companies to the region. Fife Council also centered their operations in Glenrothes.

There are many notable historical buildings to be seen in Fife, some of which are managed by the National Trust for Scotland or Heritage Scotland. They include Dunfermline abbey (last resting place of Scottish Royalty), the Palace in Culross, Ravenscraig Castle in Kirkcaldy, Dysart Harbour area, Balgonie Castle near Coaltown of Balgonie, Falkland Palace (hunting palace of the Scottish Kings), Kellie Castle near Pittenweem, Hill of Tarvit (a historical house), St Andrews Castle (with a gruesome bottle dungeon), St Andrews Cathedral and St Rules' Tower.

Geography

  1. REDIRECT Template:SectstubImage:Wp_globe_tiny.gif

Fife is a peninsula in eastern Scotland bordered on the north by the Firth of Tay, on the east by the North Sea and the Firth of Forth to the south. The route to the west is partially blocked by the mass of the Ochil Hills. Almost all traffic into and out of Fife has to pass over one of three bridges, south on The Forth Road Bridge, west on the Kincardine Bridge or north east via The Tay Road Bridge, the exception being traffic headed north on the M90. It is a sore point among local residents that the only two bridges in Scotland (Tay and Forth) on which a toll has to be paid are those leading into Fife, with the tolls retained by the Scottish Executive for national use. The Erskine and Skye bridges did have tolls, but these were abolished recently (as of 2006).

There are a number of extinct volcanic features, such as the Lomond Hills which rise above rolling farmland, and Largo Law, a volcanic plug in the east. At 522m (or 1713 feet), the West Lomond is the highest point in Fife. The coast has many fine but small harbours, from the industrial docks in Burntisland and Rosyth to the fishing villages of the East Neuk such as Anstruther and Pittenweem. The large area of flat land to the north of the Lomond Hills, through which the River Eden flows, is known as the Howe of Fife. File:Northeast Fife.jpg North of the Lomond Hills can be found many villages and small towns in a primarily agricultural landscape. The areas in the south and west of Fife, including the towns of Dunfermline, Glenrothes, Kirkcaldy and the Levenmouth region are much more lightly industrial and densely populated. The only area which could claim to be heavy industry is that of Rosyth, around the naval dockyard.

The east corner of Fife, generally that east of a line between Leven and St Andrews is recognised throughout Scotland as the "East Neuk" (or corner) of Fife, small settlements around sheltered harbours, with distinctive vernacular "Dutch" or craw(crow)stepped gabled and stone-built architecture - an area much sought after as second homes of the Edinburgh professional classes in the 30 years since the Forth Road Bridge was built. The fishing industry on which the East Neuk settlements were built has declined in recent years with the main fishing fleet now operating from Pittenweem and the harbour in Anstruther being used as a marina for pleasure craft.

Towns and villages

Places of interest

Notable Fifers

Sports

Council political composition

Fife Council has a joint SNP/Liberal Democrat local government administration following the recent elections. Labour and the other parties form the opposition. [1]

Trivia

In William Shakespeare's play Macbeth, the Thane of Fife is Macduff.

External links

See also


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Fife. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.


Facts about FifeRDF feed
County of country United Kingdom  +
County of subdivision1 Scotland  +

This article uses material from the "Fife" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

[[File:|right|thumb|Fife]] Fife is a county on the north coast of the Firth of Forth, Scotland. The county town is Glenrothes.

For local government, the county is a council area too.

The towns in Fife are:


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