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This is a list of media related to the Final Fantasy video game series. Final Fantasy is a series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (formerly Square). Its first game premiered in Japan in 1987, and Final Fantasy games have subsequently been localized for markets in North America, Europe and Australia, on nearly every video game console since the Nintendo Entertainment System, including MSX2, Super Nintendo, PlayStation, WonderSwan (Color), PlayStation 2, IBM PC, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo DS, Xbox 360, and several models of mobile phone. Future games have been announced for Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation Portable, and PlayStation 3 game systems. Final Fantasy is Square Enix's most successful franchise, having sold over 80 million units worldwide to date,[1] including tactical role-playing games, portable games, MMORPGs, and games for mobile phones, in addition to console role-playing games. Its popularity has placed it as the fourth-best-selling video game franchise, among other honors.[2]

As of 2010, thirteen games have been released as part of the main (numbered) series, as well as many spin-offs and related titles. Each game in the main series takes place in a different fictional universe, though beginning with Final Fantasy X-2, video games set in main series games' worlds have been released. In addition to video games, Final Fantasy has spawned several anime, movies, novels and manga, as well as a few radio dramas. Many games, particularly the main series, have several companion soundtracks with music from the games. Since the announcement of Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Square Enix has focused on "polymorphic content", expanding each game world with material on many video game platforms, as well as other forms of media.[3]

Contents

Video games

Main series

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy December 18, 1987[4] July 12, 1990[5]
Notes:
Final Fantasy II December 17, 1988[4]
Notes:
Final Fantasy III April 27, 1990[4]
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV July 19, 1991[6] November 23, 1991[7]
Notes:
Final Fantasy V December 6, 1992[6]
Notes:
Final Fantasy VI April 2, 1994[6] October 11, 1994[9]
Notes:
Final Fantasy VII January 31, 1997[10] September 7, 1997[11] November 1, 1997[12]
Notes:
Final Fantasy VIII February 11, 1999[10] September 9, 1999[14] October 27, 1999[15]
Notes:
Final Fantasy IX July 7, 2000[16] November 13, 2000[16] February 16, 2001[16]
Notes:
Final Fantasy X July 19, 2001[17] December 17, 2001[17] May 24, 2002[17]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XI May 16, 2002[18] October 28, 2003[19] September 16, 2004[15]
Notes:
  • Officially titled Final Fantasy XI: Online
  • Released on PlayStation 2 (2002), Microsoft Windows personal computer (2002), and Xbox 360 (2006)
  • Four expansion packs have been released: Rise of the Zilart (2003), Chains of Promathia (2004), Treasures of Aht Urhgan (2006), and Wings of the Goddess (2007).
  • Three add-ons have been released: A Crystalline Prophecy (March 2009), A Moogle Kupo d'Etat (July 2009), A Shantotto Ascension (November 2009).
  • The first expansion was included in the North American release of the game in 2003
  • The first two expansions were included in the European release of the game in 2004
  • The first three expansions were included in the Xbox 360 release of the game in 2006
  • Final Fantasy XI: The Vana'diel Collection 2008 includes all four expansions
  • The Final Fantasy XI: Ultimate Collection includes all four expansions and all three add-ons, but is not available for the PlayStation 2[20]
Final Fantasy XII March 16, 2006[21] October 31, 2006[22] February 23, 2007[23]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIII December 17, 2009[24] March 9, 2010[25] March 9, 2010[25]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIV TBA (2010) TBA (2010) TBA (2010)
Notes:
Final Fantasy XV TBA TBA TBA
Notes:
  • Ideas for the game are currently being discussed although the project is not yet in a development phase.[27]

Main series-related games

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy Tactics June 20, 1997[10] January 28, 1998[14]
Notes:
Final Fantasy Tactics Advance February 14, 2003[18] September 8, 2003[19] October 24, 2003[15]
Notes:
  • Released on Game Boy Advance
  • Tactical role-playing game featuring concepts and themes from the Final Fantasy series
  • Set in a dream version of Ivalice, which features places, characters, and races later to be seen in main series game Final Fantasy XII
Final Fantasy X-2 March 13, 2003[18] November 18, 2003[19] February 20, 2004[15]
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV: The After Years February 18, 2008[29] June 1, 2009[30] June 5, 2009[30]
Notes:
Fortress TBA TBA TBA
Notes:
  • Spin-off of Final Fantasy XII initially developed by GRIN before being handed over to another, currently undisclosed studio.[31]

Compilation of Final Fantasy VII

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII September 29, 2004[32]
Notes:
Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII January 26, 2006[21] August 15, 2006[33] November 17, 2006[34]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation 2
  • Third person shooter with role-playing game elements
  • Sequel to Final Fantasy VII, taking place three years after Final Fantasy VII
  • A "lost episode" was released August 18, 2006 which takes places midway through Dirge of Cerberus[21]
  • International version released in Japan for PlayStation 2 on September 4, 2008[35]
Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII September 13, 2007[36] March 25, 2008[37] June 26, 2008[38]
Notes:

Ivalice Alliance

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings April 26, 2007[36] November 20, 2007[39] February 15, 2008[40]
Notes:
Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions May 10, 2007[36] October 9, 2007[41] October 5, 2007[41]
Notes:
Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift October 25, 2007[42] June 24, 2008[43] June 27, 2008[44]
Notes:

Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy Agito XIII TBA TBA TBA
Notes:
Final Fantasy Versus XIII TBA TBA TBA
Notes:
  • To be released on PlayStation 3
  • Announced at E³ 2006, takes place in different universe from Final Fantasy XIII, but features a similar mythology[46]

Spin-offs

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy Legend
Notes:
  • Released on Game Boy
  • The first three games of the SaGa series were marketed in North America as The Final Fantasy Legend (1990),[47] Final Fantasy Legend II (1991),[48] and Final Fantasy Legend III (1993).[49]
  • None of the three games bore any Final Fantasy branding in their original Japanese versions, where they were titled Makai Toushi Sa・Ga (魔界塔士 Sa・Ga lit. Warrior in the Tower of the Spirit World ~ Sa・Ga?), Sa・Ga2: Hihō Densetsu (Sa・Ga2: 秘宝伝説 lit. Sa・Ga2: The Treasure Legend?), and Jikuu no Hasha ~ Sa・Ga3 [Kanketsu Hen] (時空の覇者 Sa・Ga3 [完結編] lit. The Ruler of Time and Space ~ Sa・Ga3 [Final Chapter]?). The Final Fantasy name was dropped for later SaGa games brought to North America.
  • Reissued by Sunsoft (again under the Final Fantasy Legend name) in 1998[50]
Final Fantasy Adventure June 8, 1991[51] November 1, 1991[51] June 17, 1993[52]
Notes:
  • Released on Game Boy
  • Known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden (聖剣伝説 ~ファイナルファンタジー外伝~ Legend of the Holy Sword: Final Fantasy Gaiden?) and in Europe as Mystic Quest
  • Released as a side story for the Final Fantasy series, it has generated its own series, called Mana
  • Featured some elements from the Final Fantasy series which did not reappear in later titles or in its remake, Sword of Mana (2003)
Final Fantasy Mystic Quest September 10, 1993[53] October 5, 1992[53] 1993[53]
Notes:
  • Released on Super Nintendo Entertainment System
  • Role-playing game with action-adventure elements
  • Designed to introduce American audiences to the role-playing game genre
  • Released in Japan as Final Fantasy USA: Mystic Quest and in Europe as Mystic Quest Legend
Chocobo
Notes:
  • Series of games of different genres featuring a Chocobo as the main character with environments based on the Final Fantasy series
  • Only Chocobo's Dungeon 2, Chocobo Racing, Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales, and Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon have been released outside of Japan.
  • 1997—Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon (Chocobo's Mysterious Dungeon)—PlayStation[54]
  • 1999—Chocobo's Dungeon 2PlayStation[55]
  • 1999—Chocobo RacingPlayStation[56]
  • 1999—Chocobo CollectionPlayStation[57]
    • Compilation of Chocobo Racing, the racing game Chocobo Stallion, and the board game Dice de Chocobo
  • 2000—Hataraku Chocobo (Chocobo on the Job)—WonderSwan Color[58]
  • 2002—Chocobo Land: A Game of DiceGame Boy Advance[59]
  • 2003—Choco-MateMobile phone[60]
  • 2006—Chocobo de MobileMobile phone[61]
  • 2006—Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo TalesNintendo DS[62]
  • 2007—Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's DungeonWii[63]
  • 2008—Final Fantasy Fables: Cid and Chocobo's Dungeon DS+Nintendo DS[64]
    • Remake of Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon with a new storyline and expanded gameplay
  • 2008—Chocobo to Mahō no Ehon: Majō to Shōjo to Gonin no Yūsha (Chocobo and the Magic Picture Book: The Witch, the Girl, and the Five Heroes)—Nintendo DS[65]
    • Sequel to Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales
Final Fantasy: Unlimited with U August 20, 2002[66]
Notes:
  • A mobile phone game set in the Final Fantasy: Unlimited universe
Final Fantasy: Unlimited on PC Adventure - Labyrinth May 16, 2003[67]
Notes:
  • A PC game set in the Final Fantasy: Unlimited universe, published by Amada Printing
  • Contains an adventure game mode and a card battle mode
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles
Notes:
Final Fantasy VII Snowboarding March 29, 2005[75]
Notes:
Crystal Defenders
Notes:
Dissidia: Final Fantasy December 18, 2008[79] August 25, 2009[79] September 4, 2009[79]
Notes:
Hikari no 4 Senshi: Final Fantasy Gaiden October 29, 2009[80] TBA TBA
Notes:

Compilations and collections

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy I•II February 27, 1994[82]
Notes:
  • Released on Famicom
  • Compilation of Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II on one cartridge
Final Fantasy Collection March 11, 1999[83]
Notes:
  • Japan-exclusive compilation of the PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy IV, Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI in special edition packaging with omake extras
  • Fifty-thousand limited edition copies of the collection included a Final Fantasy-themed alarm clock[84]
Final Fantasy Anthology October 5, 1999[85] May 17, 2002[86]
Notes:
  • North American release includes PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI with a special edition soundtrack CD
  • PAL release includes PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy V
Final Fantasy Chronicles June 29, 2001[87]
Notes:
  • Released only in North America, a compilation of the PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy IV and Chrono Trigger
Final Fantasy Origins October 31, 2002[88] April 8, 2003[88] March 14, 2003[88]
Notes:
  • Compilation of the PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II in special edition packaging with omake extras, under the title Final Fantasy I+II Premium Package
  • Released in North America and Europe in 2003 without any packaging extras, aside from two double-sided art cards in the European release
Final Fantasy Mobile March 1, 2004[89]
Notes:
  • Collective name for mobile phone ports of Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II, which were released separately in 2004, each for two mobile phone brands, and in 2006 for another brand
  • Final Fantasy remake also called Final Fantasy i and Final Fantasy EZ, depending on the phone
Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls July 29, 2004[90] November 29, 2004[90] December 3, 2004[90]
Notes:
  • Compilation of the Game Boy Advance ports of Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II, including two special bonus stages, "Soul of Chaos" and "Soul of Rebirth"
Finest Fantasy for Advance
Notes:
Final Fantasy X/X-2 Ultimate Box September 9, 2005[92]
Notes:
  • Boxed set of Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2 with a bonus disc

Film and television

Title Original release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals March 21, 1994[93] November 24, 1998
Notes:
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within August 10, 2001 July 11, 2001 August 10, 2001
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited October 2, 2001 October 28, 2003
Notes:
  • Original 25 episode animated television series by GONZO featuring concepts and themes from the Final Fantasy games
Final Fantasy VII Advent Children September 14, 2005[94] April 25, 2006[94] April 24, 2006[94]
Notes:
  • Feature-length, theatrically released computer-generated film serving as a sequel to Final Fantasy VII
  • Part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII
  • A director's cut version of the movie was released in 2009 on Blu-ray disc as Final Fantasy VII Advent Children Complete
Last Order: Final Fantasy VII September 14, 2005 February 20, 2007
Notes:
On the Way to a Smile: Episode of Denzel April 16, 2009[95] June 2, 2009[96] July 27, 2009
Notes:

Companion books

Starting with Final Fantasy III, Square began publishing guide books for its games which traditionally include additional content such as developer interviews and expanded plot and setting information. Studio BentStuff wrote the first Ultimania book for Final Fantasy VIII in 1999, though the company had been contracted to write Final Fantasy VII True Script Dissection for the previous game. Since then, Ultimania books have been written for every major Final Fantasy title, including Battle Ultimania, Scenario Ultimania, and Ultimania Omega editions for some games.

Novels and manga

Final Fantasy II
Muma no Meikyū

1989[97]novel
Notes:
  • Novelization of Final Fantasy II written by Kenji Terada
  • The title roughly translates as "Labyrinth of Nightmare"
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 978-4-04-410604-1
Yūkyū no Kaze Densetsu
Final Fantasy III

1992[98]manga
Notes:
  • Manga adaptation of Final Fantasy III by Yū Kinutani (art) and Kenji Terada (story).
  • The title roughly translates as "Eternal Legend of the Wind"
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 978-4-04-926037-3
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within

2001[99]novel
Notes:
  • Novelization of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within by John Vornholt
  • isbn = (NA) ISBN 978-0-74-342419-6
Final Fantasy: Unlimited After

2002[100] – collection of short stories
Notes:
  • A series of web novels published on the official Japanese Final Fantasy: Unlimited website, which continue the story of the anime
  • Later included in a single anthology published by Digicube
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 4887870353
Sō no Kizuna

2002[101]novel
Notes:
  • A side story to Final Fantasy: Unlimited
  • The title literally translates to "The Bonds of Two"
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 978-4-0442-7701-7
Final Fantasy XI

2003[102]novels
Notes:
  • Series of novels set in the Final Fantasy XI continuity, written by Miyabi Hasegawa
  • Released in Japanese, German and French[103]
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 978-4-7577-1424-3
Final Fantasy XI
~The Out of Orders~

2004[104]manhwa
Notes:
  • Manhwa set in the Final Fantasy XI continuity, by Kim Byung Jin (art) and Kim Sungjae (story)
  • Never released outside of Korea
  • isbn = (KO) ISBN 978-4-7577-1424-3
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles
~Hatenaki Sora no Mukō ni~

2004[105]manga
Notes:
  • Manga adaptation of Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles by Ryunosuke Ichikawa (3 volumes)
  • The title roughly translates as "Beyond the Endless Sky"
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 4-7575-1455-7
Hoshi o Meguru Otome

2005[106]novella
Notes:
  • Novella set in Final Fantasy VII's continuity, written by Benny Matsuyama and published in the Final Fantasy VII Ultimania Ω guidebook
  • The title roughly translates as "The Maiden Who Travels the Planet"
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 4-7575-1520-0

2005[107]novella
Notes:
  • Collection of two novellas set in Final Fantasy VII's continuity, written by Kazushige Nojima and published in the book Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children Prologue
  • The first novella is titled "Case of Denzel" and the second "Case of Tifa"
  • Released in English in the Advent Children Limited Collector's Set along with "Case of Barret" written expressly for that release
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 4-0877-9339-7
Musei Renu Haito, Tōbae wa Onore Mazu

2006[108]short story
Notes:
  • Short story set in Final Fantasy XII's continuity, written by Benny Matsuyama and published in the Final Fantasy XII Ultimania Ω guidebook
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • The title roughly translates as "In the abandoned capital where mist never clears up, the first howling comes from me"
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles
Ring of Fates 4 Komaansoroji Komikku

2008[109]manga
Notes:
  • Manga adaptation of Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Ring of Fates (2 volumes)
  • The title roughly translates as "Ring of Fates 4-Panel Anthology Comic"
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • isbn = (JA) ISBN 978-4-7577-4103-4
Adventure Log

2007[110]webcomic
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV

2008[111]novels
Notes:
  • Two-volume novelization of Final Fantasy IV
  • Never released outside of Japan
  • isbn = (JP) ISBN 4757524587 (Vol. 1) ISBN 4757524595 (Vol. 2)
Final Fantasy XIII Episode Zero: Promise

2009[citation needed] – collection of short stories
Notes:
  • Series of web novels published on the official Japanese Final Fantasy XIII website, depicting the thirteen days leading up to its events.
  • Written by Jun Eishima

Radio drama


2003[112] – 4 CD
Notes:
  • A Japanese-exclusive adaptation of the game's story in radio drama form. It was aired in January and February 2003. The series was released by DigiCube on CD in four separate parts
Final Fantasy: Unlimited Before

2003 – radio drama
Notes:
  • A Japanese-exclusive drama which features a flashback to the events of Final Fantasy: Unlimited. It was awarded to competition winners in Japan.[113]
Final Fantasy: Unlimited After 2

2003 – radio drama
Notes:
  • A Japanese-exclusive drama which continues the story of the anime.[114]

Music and soundtracks

The primary composer of music for the main series was Nobuo Uematsu, who single-handedly composed the soundtracks for the first nine games, as well as directing the production of many of the albums. Music for the spin-off series and main series games beginning with Final Fantasy X was created by a variety of composers including Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, Hitoshi Sakimoto, and Kumi Tanioka, as well as many others.[2]

The majority of Final Fantasy games, including all of the main series games, have received a soundtrack album release. Many have also inspired orchestral, vocal, or piano arrangement albums. These albums have been produced and reprinted by a number of different companies, including DigiCube, NTT Publishing, Square Enix itself, and many others. Additionally, many albums have been made available at the iTunes Music Store.[115] In addition to the regular albums, a number of compilation albums of songs from several Final Fantasy games have been produced both by Square Enix and outside groups. Music from the original soundtracks of the Final Fantasy games has been arranged as sheet music for the piano and published by DOREMI Music Publishing, while sheet music from the Final Fantasy piano albums have been published by Yamaha Music Media.[116][117] Music from the franchise has been performed numerous times in concert tours and other live performances such as the Orchestral Game Music Concerts and the Video Games Live concert tour, as well as forming the basis of specific Final Fantasy concerts such as the Dear Friends and Distant Worlds concert tours.[118][119] Several of the Final Fantasy concerts have an accompanying album release.[120]

See also

References

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  2. ^ a b "Final Frontiers", Edge (Future Publishing) (177): 72–79, July 2007 
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Sources


Final Fantasy Anthology
Developer(s) Square
TOSE
Publisher(s) NA Square Electronic Arts
EU SCE Europe
Series Final Fantasy
Platform(s) PlayStation
Release date(s) NA October 5, 1999[1]
EU May 17, 2002
Genre(s) Console role-playing game
Mode(s) Single player, multiplayer
Rating(s) ELSPA: 11+
ESRB: Teen
OFLC: G8+
USK: Free For All
Media 2 CD-ROMs
Input methods Gamepad

Final Fantasy Anthology is a compilation of two Final Fantasy console role-playing games by Square for the Sony PlayStation. Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI are featured in the North American edition, while Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy V are in the PAL region edition. The games were ported by TOSE from the original Super Nintendo Entertainment System versions. Final Fantasy Anthology was published in North America on October 5, 1999 by Square Electronic Arts and in the PAL region on May 17, 2002 by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe.

In Japan, all three games were released for the PlayStation both individually and packaged together as part of a limited edition box set called Final Fantasy Collection. Although all three games differ little from the original Japanese versions in terms of gameplay, graphics, and sound, a number of extras were added, including art galleries, bestiaries, and two full motion video opening and ending sequences not present in the original releases.

Contents

Gameplay

The gameplay in both Final Fantasy V and VI use many standard role-playing elements; characters grow in strength by gaining experience points from random encounters with monsters on the overworld or in a dungeon. Experience culminates in a "level up" in which party members' attributes, such as hit points or magic power, increase. Like previous Final Fantasy installments, the games consist of four basic modes of gameplay: an overworld map, town and dungeon field maps, a battle screen, and a menu screen. The overworld map is a scaled-down version of the game's fictional world, which the player uses to direct characters to various locations.

Active Time Battle (ATB) system, in which time flows continuously for both the player and enemies during combat, is used in both these games.[2] The first game to use this system was Final Fantasy IV.

Final Fantasy V uses the Job system, expanded from Final Fantasy III, while keeping a predetermined amount of characters in the party at all times, whereas Final Fantasy VI has a large number of selectable playable characters which often leave and reenter the party, or the large party splits up and you must play through the segment as that party, then switch to another, then the other, etc.

Development

The original Super NES version of Final Fantasy V wasn't previously released outside of Japan (although an English language software localization was produced for an abortive Microsoft Windows port). Final Fantasy VI had previously been released in North America as Final Fantasy III; Ted Woolsey's translated and localized script from the Super NES was used for Final Fantasy Anthology, with minor changes (e.g. the item "Fenix Down" was renamed "Phoenix Down" to match later games in the series), though his name was omitted from the credits in this release. Some images had been censored or modified for the original North American release, and in Anthology, all of the original Japanese graphics have been restored.

Neither Final Fantasy IV, Final Fantasy V, nor Final Fantasy VI had previously been released in Europe in any form. Fan translations of Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy V had been made by the J2e Translations and RPGe teams, respectively; they differ from their Final Fantasy Anthology releases only in terms of the script. Alternatively, this compilation was released in Europe also, titled Final Fantasy Anthology: European Edition.

Music from FFV and FFVI

Music from FFV and FFVI
File:Final Fantasy Anthology Album
Soundtrack by Nobuo Uematsu
Length 56:54
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

The Music from FFV and FFVI bonus disc contains a selection of tracks, taken from the original soundtrack releases for Final Fantasy V (track 1–9) and Final Fantasy VI (10–22), respectively. The CD does not contain the background music of the game's full motion video sequences and is only available in the initial release, not the "Greatest Hits" edition.


Reception

 Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 85%[4]
Metacritic 80 of 100[3]
Review scores
Publication Score
Allgame [5]
GamePro 4 of 5[6]
GameSpot 8.1 of 10[7]
IGN 9 of 10[8]

Final Fantasy Anthology was met with mixed reviews, especially from North American audiences, who tended to be especially critical of the loading time inherent in the CD-ROM format utilized by the PlayStation but not in the original cartridge format utilized by the SNES. Players could expect a 2-4 second load time when accessing the items menus, and the transition between fight scenes also suffered from lags.

As the North American release did not include the PlayStation port of Final Fantasy IV, that title was subsequently packaged with Chrono Trigger and released two years later as Final Fantasy Chronicles in 2001. The PlayStation port of Final Fantasy VI was released separately in Europe. The "Fast" disc speed of the PlayStation driver in the PlayStation 2 can be used to decrease load times in Final Fantasy Anthology.[citation needed]

The game went quickly out of print,[citation needed] especially when Final Fantasy Chronicles was released in 2001. In 2003, Square Enix re-released Final Fantasy Anthology as a PlayStation "Greatest Hits" game.[9]

See also

References

External links



Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Final Fantasy Anthology
Box artwork for Final Fantasy Anthology.
Developer(s) Square
Publisher(s) Square
Release date(s)
Genre(s) RPG
System(s) PlayStation
Players 2
Series Final Fantasy

Final Fantasy Anthology is a compilation of two Square console RPGs remade and re-released for the Sony PlayStation. The North American release replaces Final Fantasy IV with Final Fantasy VI.

This compilation contains the following games:


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Final Fantasy Compilations article)

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Contents

Final Fantasy I-II

Final Fantasy I-II is a compilation of two Final Fantasy games for the Nintendo Famicom. It was released on February 27, 1994 only in Japan and it contains Final Fantasy I and Final Fantasy II.


Final Fantasy Anthology

Final Fantasy Anthology was released on September 30, 1999 in North America and May 17, 2002 in Europe. The North American release includes the games Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI, while the PAL release includes Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy V. This compilation was released for the PlayStation.

Final Fantasy Collection

Final Fantasy Collection was released on March 11, 1999 only in Japan for the PlayStation. The compilation contains Final Fantasy IV, Final Fantasy V, and Final Fantasy VI.


Final Fantasy Origins

Final Fantasy Origins is a compilation of Final Fantasy I and Final Fantasy II. It was released in April 8, 2003.

Final Fantasy Chronicles

Final Fantasy Chronicles is a compilation of Final Fantasy IV and Chrono Trigger released for the Sony PlayStation on June 29, 2001. Final Fantasy IV includes new 3D FMVs to replace the original cut-scenes. Chrono Trigger gets new anime cut scenes drawn in a similar style to that of Akira Toriyama. Because of these changes, both games now feature loading times before each scene.

Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls

Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls also known as Final Fantasy I & II Advance in Europe, was released on July 29, 2004 in Japan; November 29, 2004 in North America, and December 3, 2004 in Europe. The compilation is released for the Game Boy Advance and contains the games Final Fantasy I and Final Fantasy II.

Ultimate Hits: Final Fantasy X / X-2

On January 25, 2007 Ultimate Hits: Final Fantasy X / X-2 was released for the PlayStation 2. Ultimate Hits: Final Fantasy X / X-2 contains Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2

Final Fantasy stub
This Final Fantasy-related article is a stub. You can help by adding to it.

Stubs are articles that writers have begun work on, but are not yet complete enough to be considered finished articles.


Final Fantasy series
FF I | FF II | FF III | FF IV | FF V | FF VI | FF VII | FF VIII | FF IX | FF X | FF XI | FF XII | FF XIII | FF XIV
Tactics
Final Fantasy Tactics | Final Fantasy Tactics Advance | Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift
Crystal Chronicles
Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles | Ring of Fates | My Life as a King | Echoes of Time | My Life as a Darklord | The Crystal Bearers
Collections, Compilations and Updates
Final Fantasy Compilations - Final Fantasy Updates
Sequels and Spin Offs
Final Fantasy X-2 | Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII | Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII | Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII | Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings | Dissidia: Final Fantasy | Final Fantasy IV: The After Years | Final Fantasy Versus XIII | Final Fantasy Agito XIII
Related Games/Series
Final Fantasy Mystic Quest |

SaGa series (a.k.a. Final Fantasy Legend) | Seiken Densetsu series (a.k.a. Final Fantasy Adventure)

Movies and Animation
Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children | Final Fantasy: Legends of the Crystals

Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within | Final Fantasy: Unlimited


This article uses material from the "Final Fantasy Compilations" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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