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Cover of Wikis for Dummies, ISBN 978-0-470-04399-8

For Dummies is an extensive series of instructional books which are intended to present non-intimidating guides for readers new to the various topics covered. Despite the title, their publisher takes pains to emphasize that the books are not literally for dummies. The subtitle for every book is "A Reference for the Rest of Us." To date, over 1,700 For Dummies titles have been published. The series has been a worldwide success with editions in numerous other languages.

The books are an example of a media franchise, consistently sporting a distinctive cover — usually yellow and black with a triangular-headed cartoon figure known as "Dummies Man", and an informal, hand-writing style logo. The icons and much of the design was originally done by University Graphics, a Palo Alto design firm.[citation needed] Prose is simple and direct; bold icons, such as a piece of string tied around an index finger, are placed in the margin to indicate particularly important passages.

Almost all Dummies books are organized around sections called "parts," which are groups of related chapters. Parts are almost always preceded by a Rich Tennant comic that refers to some part of the subject under discussion. Sometimes the same Tennant drawing reappears in another Dummies book with a new caption, but based on the group of readers, it is not expected to be noticed.[citation needed]

Another constant in the Dummies series is "The Part of Tens", a section at the end of the book where lists of ten items are published. They are usually resources for further study and sometimes also include amusing bits of information that don't fit readily elsewhere.

Contents

History

The For Dummies series began during 1991 with DOS for Dummies, written by Dan Gookin and published by IDG Books. The book became popular due to a lack of beginner-friendly materials on using DOS. While initially the series focused on software and technology topics, it later branched out to more general-interest titles. The series is now published by John Wiley & Sons, which acquired Hungry Minds (the new name for IDG Books as of 2000) in early 2001.

Expansions and alternate versions

Several related series have been published, including Dummies 101, with step-by-step tutorials in a large-format book, because the author realized that most people who need these books have difficulty with smaller text (now discontinued); More ... for Dummies, which are essentially sequels to the first ... For Dummies book on the subject; For Dummies Quick Reference, which is a condensed alphabetical reference to the subject. A larger All-in-One Desk Reference format offers more comprehensive coverage of the subject, normally running about 750 pages. As well, some books in this series are smaller and do not follow the same formatting style as the others.

A spin-off board game, "Crosswords for Dummies", was produced in the late 90's. The game is similar to Scrabble, but instead of letter tiles, players draw short strips of cardboard containing pre-built English words. The words vary in length from 3 to 7 letters, with more points acquired for playing longer words.

See also

External links


For Dummies
Author Various
Illustrator Rich Tennant
Country  United States
Language English
Genre Instructional / reference
Publisher IDG Books / Hungry Minds. Later John Wiley & Sons.

For Dummies is an extensive series of instructional / reference books which are intended to present non-intimidating guides for readers new to the various topics covered. Despite the title, their publisher has taken great pains to emphasize that the For Dummies books are not literally for dummies. The subtitle for every book is, "A Reference for the Rest of Us!". To date, over 1,700 For Dummies titles have been published. The series has been a worldwide success with editions in numerous other languages.

The books are an example of a media franchise, consistently sporting a distinctive cover — usually yellow and black with a triangular-headed cartoon figure known as the "Dummies Man", and an informal, hand-writing style logo. The icons and much of the design was originally done by University Graphics, a Palo Alto design firm.[citation needed] Prose is simple and direct; bold icons, such as a piece of string tied around an index finger, are placed in the margin to indicate particularly important passages.

Almost all Dummies books are organized around sections called "parts", which are groups of related chapters. Parts are almost always preceded by a Rich Tennant comic that refers to some part of the subject under discussion. Sometimes the same Tennant drawing reappears in another Dummies book with a new caption.

Another constant in the Dummies series is "The Part of Tens", a section at the end of the book where lists of ten items are published. They are usually resources for further study and sometimes also include amusing bits of information that don't fit readily elsewhere.

Contents

History

The For Dummies series began during 1991 with DOS for Dummies, written by Dan Gookin and published by IDG Books. The book became popular due to a lack of beginner-friendly materials on using DOS. While initially the series focused on software and technology topics (and still does), it later branched out to more general-interest titles, with topics as diverse as Acne for Dummies, Chess for Dummies, Fishing for Dummies, and many other topics. The series is now published by John Wiley & Sons, which acquired Hungry Minds (the new name for IDG Books as of 2000) in early 2001.

Expansions and alternate versions

Several related series have been published, including Dummies 101, with step-by-step tutorials in a large-format book (now discontinued); More ... for Dummies, which are essentially sequels to the first ... For Dummies book on the subject; For Dummies Quick Reference, which is a condensed alphabetical reference to the subject. A larger All-in-One Desk Reference format offers more comprehensive coverage of the subject, normally running about 750 pages. As well, some books in this series are smaller and do not follow the same formatting style as the others.

A spin-off board game, "Crosswords for Dummies", was produced in the late '90s. The game is similar to Scrabble, but instead of letter tiles, players draw short strips of cardboard containing pre-built English words. The words vary in length from 3 to 7 letters, with more points acquired for playing longer words. Another board game, "SAT Game For Dummies", is used in SAT preparation.

Parodies

Parodies of For Dummies books have been used for humorous (especially satirical) purposes.

For example, inThe Simpsons episode Insane Clown Poppy , Bart reads a bit in "Moby Dick for Dummies", which starts with the words "Call me Ishmael, dummy."


In the movie Evan Almighty God sends Evan the book titled "Ark Building for Dummies".

See also

References

External links


Simple English

The ...for dummies is a series of books that try to explain something very simply. The series was created in 1991 by Dan Gookin. The first book was about the computer operating system MS-DOS. Dan Gookin created the book, because in 1987 a person wanted a book that was simple and easy to read, as the person considered computer books to be dull at that time. After MS-DOS for dummies, came PC's for Dummies by Gookin, and Andy Rathbone. Other popular ...For Dummies books are The Internet for Dummies by John Levine, Carol Baroudi, and Margaret Levine Young, and Beginning Programming for Dummies by Wallace Wang.

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