For He's a Jolly Good Fellow: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Not to be confused with Lostprophets song "For He's a Jolly Good Felon".

"For He's A Jolly Good Fellow" is a song which is sung to congratulate a person on a significant event, such as a retirement, a promotion, a birthday, the birth of a child, or the winning of a championship sporting event. The melody originates from that of the French song "Marlbrough s'en va-t-en guerre." The traditional children's song, The Bear Went Over the Mountain is sung to the same tune.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" is the second-most popular song in the English language, following "Happy Birthday to You" and followed by "Auld Lang Syne." It is frequently used instead of "Happy Birthday to You" in films and TV to avoid possible copyright issues.

Contents

History

The tune was originally composed the night after the Battle of Malplaquet in 1709.[1]

Lyrics

As with many songs that use gender-specific pronouns, the song can be altered to agree with the sex of the intended recipient, "he" being replaced with "she."

Advertisements

American version

For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (hold then)(pause), which nobody can deny
Which nobody can deny, which nobody can deny
For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (hold then)(pause), which nobody can deny!

British and Australian version

For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (pause), and so say all of us
And so say all of us, and so say all of us
For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (pause), and so say all of us

Variations

  • The British and American versions can be combined, normally with "and so say all of us" in the middle of the verse, and "which nobody can deny" at the end.
  • In some parts of the United Kingdom, when singing the song to the driver of a bus or coach, usually on a specially commissioned trip rather than a standard scheduled journey, it is customary to add "on the bus" to the line "and so say all of us," resulting in "and so say all of us on the bus."[citation needed]
  • Amongst certain groups a different word is substituted for "fellow."

In popular culture

  • The 1977 Disney animated feature film The Rescuers featured a variation of the song called "For Penny's a Jolly Good Fellow."
  • The "People's Front of Judea" sung it to Brian in the ending scene of Monty Python's Life of Brian.
  • The song is sung to Mrs. Peacock in the second ending of the 1985 film Clue.
  • Fans of Arsenal F.C. have a variation called "Jolly Good Vela," named after fan-favorite Carlos Vela.
  • In the 2009 film G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, the character Zartan (played by Arnold Vosloo) has the habit of whistling the song.
  • This song Sung to "Toot" in Holly Hobby's "Toot & Puddle."
  • This song is frequently sung on the Nickelodion Television show, iCarly.
  • In the 1975 episode "Disturbing the Peace" in Ronnie Barker's famous TV show Porridge, every inmate sings the song on the return of Mr. Mackay.

See also

  • Sto lat - traditional Polish song that is sung to express good wishes to a person

References

External links


Not to be confused with Lostprophets song "For He's a Jolly Good Felon".

"For He's A Jolly Good Fellow" is a song which is sung to congratulate a person on a significant event, such as a retirement, a promotion, a birthday, the birth of a child, or the winning of a championship sporting event. The melody originates from that of the French song "Marlbrough s'en va-t-en guerre." The traditional children's song, The Bear Went Over the Mountain is sung to the same tune.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" is the second-most popular song in the English language, following "Happy Birthday to You" and followed by "Auld Lang Syne." It is frequently used instead of "Happy Birthday to You" in films and TV to avoid possible copyright issues.

Contents

History

The tune was originally composed the night after the Battle of Malplaquet in 1709.[1]

Lyrics

As with many songs that use gender-specific pronouns, the song can be altered to agree with the sex of the intended recipient, "he" being replaced with "she."

American version

For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (hold then pause), which nobody can deny
Which nobody can deny, which nobody can deny
For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (hold then pause), which nobody can deny!

British and Australian version

For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (pause), and so say all of us
And so say all of us, and so say all of us
For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow
For he's a jolly good fellow (pause), and so say all of us

Variations

  • The British and American versions can be combined, normally with "and so say all of us" in the middle of the verse, and "which nobody can deny" at the end.
  • Amongst certain groups a different word is substituted for "fellow."
  • In Spain, it is often sung at every birthday instead of Happy Birthday To You.

In popular culture

See also

See also in the movie "John Rabe", the life-safer for many chinese people in Nanjing in 1937

References

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message