The Full Wiki

More info on Four-horned Antelope

Four-horned Antelope: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Four-horned Antelope
Male of Four-horned Antelope
Female of Four-horned Antelope
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Bovinae
Genus: Tetracerus
Leach, 1825
Species: T. quadricornis
Binomial name
Tetracerus quadricornis
(Blainville, 1816)

The Four-horned Antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis) also known as the Chousingha is an antelope found in open forest in South Asia. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Tetracerus. Its primary distribution is in India extending South of the Gangetic plains down to the state of Tamilnadu. Orissa constitutes the Eastern boundary of its distribution whereas the fragmented population at Gir is its westernmost distribution. A small population is also found in the drier forests of Nepal.

Four-horned Antelope stand just over half a metre tall at the shoulder and weigh around 20 kilograms. Four-horned Antelope have a yellow-brown coat with the underside and insides of the legs being white. Its legs are thin and have a black stripe running down the forelegs.

Male Four-horned Antelope grow horns. Usually the animal has four; two between the ears and the second pair right on the front of the forehead. The male grows the first pair of horns at a young age of a few months and the second pair of horns indicates age and nutrition inputs to the animal and generally grow at an age of 14 to 15 months. The horns are never shed, but may get damaged during fights.

Four-horned Antelope live in dry deciduous forests and are solitary creatures. Four-horned Antelope are sedentary and may form territories, males tend to become very aggressive towards other males during mating season. Although many people say that these are mute animals, they can be heard while communicating either as an alarm call or to communicate with conspecifics. The call sounds like a husky 'phronk'.

Male.
Male (left) and female.
Comparison of skull
and head of a male.

References

  1. ^ Mallon, D.P. (2008). Tetracerus quadricornis. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 29 March 2009.
  • Baskaran, N., Desai, A. A., & Udhayan, A. (2009). Population distribution and conservation of the four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis) in the tropical forest of Southern India. Scientific Transactions in Environment and Technovation, 2, 139-144.
  • Sharma, K., Rahmani, A. R. and Chundawat, R. S. (2005). Ecology and Distribution of Four-horned antelope in India: Final Report. Bombay Natural History Society.
Advertisements

Simple English

Four-horned Antelope
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Bovinae
Genus: Tetracerus
Species: T. quadricornis
Binomial name
Tetracerus quadricornis
Blainville, 1816

The four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis) is an animal. It is a bovine even-toed ungulate. It is also called by its Hindi name Chousingha. It is different from other bovines because it has four horns instead of two.

Appearance

Four-horned antelopes are about 0.60 meters high, and they weigh about 20 kilograms. They have a light yellowish-brown fur with a white underside. They have a black stripe down their forelegs. Males have four horns. The back horns are about 10 centimeters long, and the front horns are up to 4 centimeters long.

Habitat and life

Four-horned antelopes live in India and Nepal. They live in forests. Four-horned Antelopes live alone. They eat grass.

Four-horned antelopes and humans

Four-horned antelopes are hunted by trophy-hunters because of their four horns, but they are also hunted for their meat. Because of the hunting and also because of habitat loss, there are now fewer than 100 four-horned antelopes.

Look up Tetracerus in Wikispecies, a directory of species
Error creating thumbnail: sh: convert: command not found
Wikimedia Commons has images, video, and/or sound related to:

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message