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Fox Sports logo.svg

Fox Sports is a division of the Fox Broadcasting Company (part of News Corporation). It was formed in 1994 with Fox's acquisition of broadcast rights to National Football League games. In subsequent years, it has televised the National Hockey League (19941999), Major League Baseball (1996–present), NASCAR (2001–present), and the Bowl Championship Series (20072010).

Contents

Exclusive coverage

Fox has become the exclusive home of the Daytona 500 after having alternated the event with NBC Sports throughout their first NASCAR contract. Also beginning in 2007 they will televise 4 Formula One races, including the United States Grand Prix and Canadian Grand Prix, plus two NASCAR Camping World Truck Series races live. In addition, Fox covered the first 90 minutes of the 45th Rolex 24 at Daytona on January 27. The Formula One and Rolex 24 events will use Speed Channel's, Fox's sister network, equipment and staff, and will be broadcasted under the Speed on Fox banner.

Fox Sports has been the exclusive broadcaster of the World Series since 2000. A new contract announced on July 11, 2006, guarantees that Fox Sports will keep the World Series through the 2013 season[1].

Regional sports coverage

Fox Sports Net operates as a regional sports network with broadcasting agreements that follow league market distribution rules. For example, cable and satellite subscribers in Nevada receive Los Angeles Lakers games on Fox Sports West, while viewers in Utah see Utah Jazz games on FSN Utah. The regionalized coverage frequently restricts broadcasts of live sporting events outside a team's home market.

Cable channels

In addition to the broadcast division, Fox owns numerous regional U.S. cable sports channels under the Fox Sports Net banner, among others. These cable channels also include:

Graphics, scoring bugs and theme music

The graphics and scoring bugs have won awards and changed the face of sports broadcasting in the United States. The opening notes of the NFL broadcast theme can be heard in every iteration of other Fox Sports broadcast themes. When the scoring bugs are upgraded, the previous versions are passed down to the various Fox Sports Net affiliates. The first score bug was used for Fox's NFL coverage, then was expanded to baseball and hockey broadcasts.

One segment of the theme, coincidentally or otherwise, echoes the notes for the "giddyup, giddyup, let's go" line from the song, "Sleigh Ride". During Christmas-season broadcasts, Fox Sports broadcasts will sometimes acknowledge this fact by seguéing from the one tune into the other as they break for a commercial.

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2001–2003

By 2001, the score bug became a banner at the top of the screen and was simpler than today's. It featured a transparent black rectangle, a baseball diamond graphic for baseball broadcasts on the far left, the team abbreviations in white with their scores in yellow boxes; the boxes were white for NFL broadcasts until Super Bowl XXXVI, when the boxes became yellow, Then the quarter or inning, time or number of outs, pitch count/speed (baseball broadcasts), and the logo of that certain Fox program, such as NFL on Fox or MLB on Fox on the far right.

2003–2006

Beginning with the 2003 NFL season, the banner was upgraded. At first the team abbreviations were replaced with the team logos, and the scores were white in black parallelograms. Unlike the previous version, the FoxBox would alternate between a black rectangle and several black parallelograms; however, it returned to being a black rectangle beginning with the 2004 NFL season, and the team logos would be later replaced with the team abbreviations in their primary colors (the team abbreviations in the colors would first be utilized on postseason baseball broadcasts that year). Whenever a team scores a point or a run, the team's score and logo would flash a few times. On the baseball broadcasts, the whole banner would flash, then the words "HOME RUN" and the team's name in the team's color zoom in to the center from both left and right. In late 2005, a new white banner resembling a chrome finish was introduced, and the team abbreviations became white letters in the team's main color; the new banner would then be expanded to NFL and NASCAR broadcasts.

The baseball broadcasts would continue to use the 2001 scoring banners and graphics in 2004 until the network's coverage of that year's postseason.

2006–current

Beginning with the 2006 NFL season, the scoring banner was upgraded again. This time it featured the real-time scores as a permanent fixture on the extreme right side of the bar, while the coloring of the banner changed to the colors of the team currently possessing the ball (the coloring of the banner was only on football broadcasts). The banner no longer flashes after runs, touchdowns, or field goals have been scored. On the baseball broadcasts, the diamond graphic appeared to be in the middle and has been slimmed down to just the three main bases, unlike other implements which included home plate. This banner, after being first used for NFL broadcasts in 2006 was eventually expanded to BCS, NASCAR, and baseball broadcasts; the baseball broadcasts, however, continued to use the late-2005 scoring banners and graphics in 2007. In 2008, NASCAR on Fox introduced a new camera embedded between turns 1 and 2 on the various tracks; it was soon called "Digger Cam" and a mascot gopher was unveiled along with it.

2009–current

For the 2009 Major League Baseball season, the graphics package was changed to be identical to the current FSN graphics. The NFL broadcasts, however, continue to use the 2006 scoring banners and graphics.

HDTV coverage

Fox Sports began airing programs in 720p HDTV starting on July 4, 2004 with the Pepsi 400, select NFL games, the 2004 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and that year's postseason. Nearly all of Fox's Sports programming now airs in HD.

Public service

In February 2008, Fox Sports announced a new charitable foundation called Fox Supports, which will give grants and marketing support for health-related causes. Each organization is tied to a specific events package seen on Fox Sports.[2]

The following are the charities supported in the history of the program:

2008-09 cycle (began with 2008 Daytona 500)

2009-10 cycle (began with 2009 Daytona 500)

Programs throughout the years

Current broadcast rights

Former broadcast rights

Technological enhancements

Main competitors

Cable offshoots

Notes and references

See also

External links


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