François Fillon: Wikis

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François Charles Amand Fillon


Incumbent
Assumed office 
17 May 2007
President Nicolas Sarkozy
Preceded by Dominique de Villepin

In office
31 March 2004 – 2 June 2005
Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin
Dominique de Villepin
Preceded by Luc Ferry
Succeeded by Gilles de Robien

In office
7 May 2002 – 31 March 2004
Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin
Preceded by Élisabeth Guigou
Succeeded by Jean-Louis Borloo

Born 4 March 1954 (1954-03-04) (age 56)
Le Mans, France
Political party Union for a Popular Movement
Spouse(s) Penelope Clarke
Profession Lawyer
Religion Roman Catholicism

François Charles Amand Fillon (French pronunciation: [fʁɑ̃swa fijɔ̃]; born 4 March 1954 in Le Mans, Sarthe) is the current Prime Minister of France, having been appointed to that office by President Nicolas Sarkozy on 17 May 2007.[1][2]

As a member of the UMP party, Fillon became Jean-Pierre Raffarin's Minister of Labour in 2002 and undertook controversial reforms of the 35-hour working week law and of the French retirement system (Loi Fillon). He became Minister of Education and Research in 2004 and proposed the much debated Fillon law on Education. In 2005, he was not included in the new government headed by Dominique de Villepin, but was elected senator for the Sarthe département. His role as a political advisor in Nicolas Sarkozy's successful race for president led to his current role.

Contents

Early life

The Fillon family has its roots in the Sarthe area.

François Fillon's father is a civil law notary, while his mother, Anne Fillon, is a celebrated historian and his youngest brother, Dominique, is a talented pianist.[3]

Fillon lives with his wife, Penelope, and five children, Marie, Charles, Antoine, Édouard and Arnaud, in the 12th century Château de Beaucé, set in 20 acres (8 ha) of woodland on the banks of the River Sarthe at the famous monastery village of Solesmes, near Sablé-sur-Sarthe about halfway between Le Mans and Angers. M. and Mme Fillon resided in various other properties, always in the Sarthe, throughout their marriage, before buying Beaucé in 1993.[3]

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Family roots and connections with United Kingdom

François Fillon speaking in the Assemblée nationale.

Fillon has a reputation as an Anglophile and has had speaking engagements at a wide variety of universities in Britain, notably the London School of Economics.[4]

His wife Penelope Kathryn Clarke was born in the village of Llanover, near Abergavenny in Wales, like him the child of a solicitor. They met while she was teaching English in her gap year in Le Mans, and they were married in the bride's family church in June 1980.[3][5][6][7] Fillon's younger brother, Pierre, an ophthalmic specialist, later married Penelope Fillon's younger sister, Jane.

Having lived all his life in the Le Mans area and now representing it politically, Fillon is an enthusiastic supporter of the city's famous 24 hour sportscar race, which he has attended nearly every year since he was a small child. He is a member of the Automobile Club de l'Ouest, which stages the event, and is on the race's organisation committee. He has competed himself in the Le Mans Legend historic sportscar races on the full 24-hour circuit and in a number of other classic road rallies.[8]

Professional résumé

Education

  • 1972, Baccalaureat, Philosophy stream.
  • 1976, M.A. Public Law, Université du Mans.
  • 1977, DEA in Public Law, University of Paris V: René Descartes.

Political career

Governmental functions

Prime minister : Since 17 May 2007.

Minister of Higher Education and Research : 1993-1995.

Minister of Information Technologies and Post : May-November 1995.

Minister of Post, Telecommunications and Space : November 1995-1997.

Minister of Social Affairs, Labor and Solidarity : 2002-2004.

Minister of National Education, Higher Education and Research : 2004-2005.

Electoral mandates

National Assembly of France

Member of the National Assembly of France for Sarthe : 1981-1993 (Became minister in 1993) / 1997-2002 (Became minister in 2002) / 2007 (Became Prime minister). Elected in 1981, reelected in 1986, 1988, 1993, 1997, 2002, 2007.

Senate of France

Senator of the Sarthe : 2005-2007 (Became Prime minister in 2007, and he appears again as a member of the National Assembly of France in June 2007). Elected in 2004, but he stays minister

Regional Council

President of the Regional Council of Pays-de-la-Loire : 1998-2002. (Resignation).

Vice-president of the Regional Council of Pays-de-la-Loire : 2002-2004.

Regional councillor of Pays-de-la-Loire : 1998-2007 (Resignation). Reelected in 2004.

General Council

President of the General Council of Sarthe : 1992-1998. Reelected in 1994.

Vice-President of the General Council of Sarthe : 1985-1992.

General councillor of the Sarthe : 1981-1998. Reelected in 1985, 1992.

Municipal Council

Mayor of Sablé-sur-Sarthe : 1983-2001. Reelected in 1989, 1995.

Deputy-mayor of Sablé-sur-Sarthe : 1981-1983.

Municipal councillor of Sablé-sur-Sarthe : 1981-2001. Reelected in 1983, 1989, 1995.

Municipal councillor of Solesmes : Since 2001. Reelected in 2008.

Community of communes Council

President of the Communauté de communes of Sablé-sur-Sarthe : Since 2001. Reelected in 2008.

Member of the Communauté de communes of Sablé-sur-Sarthe : Since 2001. Reelected in 2008.

Prime Minister

The day after he became President, Nicolas Sarkozy appointed Fillon as Prime Minister of France, charging him with the task of forming a new cabinet, which was announced on May 18, 2007.[9] By appointing as Secretary of State André Santini, who had been indicted in the Fondation Hamon affair on charges of corruption, Fillon broke for the first time since 1992 with the so-called "Balladur jurisprudence," according to which an indicted governmental personality should resign until the case is closed [10].

Fillon's First Government

From May 17, to June 18, 2007.

Ministers

Secretaries of State

  • Roger Karoutchi - Secretary of State for Parliamentary Relations (under Fillon)
  • Éric Besson - Secretary of State for Economic Prospective and Evaluation of Public Policies (under Fillon)
  • Dominique Bussereau - Secretary of State for Transport (under Juppé)
  • Jean-Pierre Jouyet - Secretary of State for European Affairs (under Kouchner)

High Commissioner

  • Martin Hirsch - High Commissioner for Active Solidarities against Poverty

Fillon's Second Government

Appointed on June 19, 2007 [11]

Ministers

Secretaries of State

  • Roger Karoutchi - Secretary of State for Parliamentary Relations (under Fillon)
  • Jean-Pierre Jouyet - Secretary of State for European Affairs (under Kouchner)
  • Laurent Wauquiez - Secretary of State, Spokesman of the Government (under Fillon)
  • Éric Besson - Secretary of State for Economic Prospective and Evaluation of Public Policies (under Fillon)
  • Valérie Létard - Secretary of State for Solidarity (under Bertrand)
  • Dominique Bussereau - Secretary of State for Transport (under Borloo)
  • Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet - Secretary of State for Ecology (under Borloo)
  • Christian Estrosi - Secretary of State for Overseas (under Alliot-Marie)
  • André Santini - Secretary of State for Civil Servants (under Wœrth)
  • Jean-Marie Bockel - Secretary of State for Cooperation and Francophony (under Kouchner)
  • Hervé Novelli - Secretary of State for Companies and Foreign Commerce (under Lagarde)
  • Fadela Amara - Secretary of State for Urban Policies (under Boutin)
  • Alain Marleix - Secretary of State for Veterans (under Morin)
  • Rama Yade - Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Human Rights (under Kouchner)
  • Luc Chatel - Secretary of State for Consumer affairs and Tourism (under Lagarde)
  • Bernard Laporte - Secretary of State for Sport (under Bachelot-Narquin)

High Commissioner

  • Martin Hirsch - High Commissioner for Active Solidarities against Poverty

Shuffles

Appointment of Secretary of State for Sport

22 October 2007[13]

  • Bernard Laporte is appointed Secretary of State for Sport (under Bachelot-Narquin)

After Municipal Elections of 2008

18 March 2008[14]
There was a shuffle of the secretaries of state following the municipal elections of 16 March 2008.

New Secretaries of State
  • Yves Jégo is appointed Secretary of State for Overseas (under Alliot-Marie) to replace Christian Estrosi
  • Hubert Falco is appointed Secretary of State for development of the territory (under Borloo)
  • Nadine Morano is appointed Secretary of State for Family (under Bertrand)
  • Christian Blanc is appointed Secretary of State for the development of the «Région Capitale» (Region of Paris) (under Borloo).
  • Anne-Marie Idrac is appointed Secretary of State for Foreign Commerce (under Lagarde).
  • Alain Joyandet is appointed Secretary of State for Cooperation and Francophony to replace Jean-Marie Bockel (under Kouchner).
Changes of attributions - Ministers
Changes of attributions - Secretaries of State
  • Laurent Wauquiez formerly Spokesman of the Government, is appointed Secretary of State for Employment (under Lagarde).
  • Luc Chatel formerly Secretary of State for Consumer affairs and Tourism is appointed Secretary of State for Consumer affairs and Industry, Spokesman of the Government (under Lagarde).
  • Éric Besson - Secretary of State for Economic Prospective and Evaluation of Public Policies is now also in charge of the Development of digital economy (under Fillon).
  • Jean-Marie Bockel - formerly Secretary of State for Cooperation and Francophony (under Kouchner), becomes Secretary of State for Defense and Veterans (under Morin).
  • Alain Marleix - formerly Secretary of State for Veterans (under Morin) becomes Secretary of State for Local Collectivities (under Alliot-Marie).
  • Bernard Laporte - formerly Secretary of State for Sport becomes Secretary of State for Sport, Youth and Associations (under Bachelot-Narquin).
  • Hervé Novelli - formerly Secretary of State for Companies and Foreign Commerce (under Lagarde) becomes Secretary of State for commerce, craft, small and medium companies, tourism and services (under Lagarde).

In December 2008

  • Patrick Devedjian is appointed Minister under the Prime Minister in charge of the Implementation of the Recovery Plan [15].
  • Bruno Le Maire replaces Jean-Pierre Jouyet as Secretary of State for European Affairs[16].

In January 2009 - Xavier Bertrand becomes head of UMP [17]

  • Brice Hortefeux becomes Minister of Labour, Social Relations, Solidarity and City to replace Xavier Bertrand.
  • Éric Besson becomes Minister of Immigration, Integration, National identity and Solidary development
  • Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet becomes Secretary of State for Economic Prospective and Development of digital economy (under Fillon).
  • Christine Boutin, formerly Minister of Housing and City becomes Minister of Housing
  • Bernard Laporte becomes back Secretary of State for Sport
  • Martin Hirsch becomes High Commissioner for Active Solidarities against Poverty and High Commissionner for Youth
  • Létard, Amara, Morano and are now Secretaries of State with Hortefeux.
  • Woerth is now in charge of Evaluation of Public Policies
  • Chantal Jouanno becomes Secretary of State for Ecology, replacing Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet

In June 2009 - After the European parliamentary elections [18]

  • Jean-Louis Borloo - Minister of State, Minister of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and Sea, in charge of green technologies and of climate change negotiations ;
  • Michèle Alliot-Marie - Minister of State, Keeper of the seals, Minister of Justice and Freedoms ;
  • Brice Hortefeux - Minister of the Interior, Overseas and Territorial Collectivities  ;
  • Xavier Darcos - Minister of Labour, Social Relations, Family and Solidarity ;
  • Éric Wœrth - Minister of Budget, Public Accounting, Civil Servants and Reform of the State ;
  • Luc Chatel - Minister of National Education, Spokesman of the Government ;
  • Bruno Le Maire - Minister of Food, Agriculture and Fishing  ;
  • Frédéric Mitterrand - Minister of Culture and Communication ;
  • Michel Mercier - Minister of Rural Space and Spatial Planning ;
  • Henri de Raincourt - Minister of Parliamentary Relations (under Fillon)  ;
  • Christian Estrosi - Minister of Industry (under Lagarde) ;
  • Valérie Létard - Secretary of State (under Borloo) ;
  • Jean-Marie Bockel - Secretary of State (under Alliot-Marie) ;
  • Hervé Novelli - Secretary of State for Commerce, Craftsmanship, Small and Medium Businesses, Tourism, Services and Consumer Rights (under Lagarde) ;
  • Rama Yade - Secretary of State for Sport (under Bachelot-Narquin) ;
  • Hubert Falco - Secretary of State for Defense and Veterans (under Morin) ;
  • Nadine Morano - Secretary of State for Family and Solidarity (under Darcos) ;
  • Pierre Lellouche - Secretary of State for European Affairs (under Kouchner) ;
  • Nora Berra - Secretary of State for the Elderly (under Darcos)  ;
  • Benoist Apparu - Secretary of State for Housing and City (under Borloo)  ;
  • Marie-Luce Penchard - Secretary of State for Overseas (under Hortefeux) ;
  • Christian Blanc - Secretary of State for the development of the «Région Capitale» (Region of Paris) (under Fillon).

In addition,

  • Bernard Kouchner
  • Christine Lagarde
  • Patrick Devedjian
  • Valérie Pécresse
  • Hervé Morin
  • Roselyne Bachelot
  • Eric Besson
  • Laurent Wauquiez
  • Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet
  • Dominique Bussereau
  • Fadela Amara
  • Alain Marleix
  • Anne-Marie Idrac
  • Alain Joyandet
  • Chantal Jouanno
  • Martin Hirsch

keep their current functions.

Awards and honours

References

  1. ^ "Communiqué de la Présidence de la République concernant la nomination du Premier ministre" (in French). Élysée Palace. 2007-05-17. http://elysee.fr/elysee/elysee.fr/francais_attente/salle_de_presse/communique_concernant_la_nommination_du_premier_ministre.76689.html. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  2. ^ Décret du 17 mai 2007 portant nomination du Premier ministre
  3. ^ a b c "Welshwoman prepares for life in French No 10". telegraph.co.uk. 2007-05-07. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/05/06/wfra206.xml. Retrieved 2007-05-12. 
  4. ^ "Anglophile Fillon is new French PM". Guardian Unlimited. 2007-05-18. http://www.guardian.co.uk/france/story/0,,2082668,00.html. Retrieved 2007-05-18. 
  5. ^ "Madame Rosbif pricks Gallic pride". London: The Times. 2007-10-07. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article2604132.ece. Retrieved 2007-10-07. 
  6. ^ "Sarkozy's first hundred days". Guardian Unlimited. 2007-05-06. http://www.guardian.co.uk/france/story/0,,2073838,00.html. Retrieved 2007-05-12. 
  7. ^ "François Fillon - Minister for National Education, Higher Education and Research". Embassy of France in the United States. 2004-03-31. http://www.ambafrance-us.org/atoz/bio/bio_fillon.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-12. 
  8. ^ "Le Mans racer to be France's next Prime Minister?". GrandPrix.com. 2007-05-07. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns19110.html. Retrieved 2007-05-12. 
  9. ^ Communiqué de la Présidence de la République concernant la composition du gouvernement de M. François FILLON, Premier ministre. Élysée Palace, 18 May 2007
  10. ^ La mise en examen de M. Santini n'a pas empêché sa nomination au gouvernement, Le Monde, 22 June 2007 (French)
  11. ^ Communiqué de la Présidence de la République annonçant la composition du gouvernement. Élysée Palace, 19 June 2007
  12. ^ Communiqué de la Présidence de la République concernant la démission du gouvernement de M. François FILLON. Élysée Palace, 18 June 2007
  13. ^ Bernard Laporte, secrétaire d'Etat chargé des sports
  14. ^ Décret de nomination du gouvernement
  15. ^ Décret de nomination du gouvernement
  16. ^ M. Bruno LE MAIRE secrétaire d’État chargé des affaires européennes - December 12, 2008
  17. ^ Nomination au gouvernement
  18. ^ Composition du nouveau gouvernement - 23-06-09

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Elisabeth Guigou
Minister of Social Affairs
2002–2004
Succeeded by
Jean-Louis Borloo
Preceded by
Luc Ferry
Minister of National Education
2004–2005
Succeeded by
Gilles de Robien
Preceded by
Dominique de Villepin
Prime Minister of France
2007–present
Incumbent

Simple English

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