France in the Eurovision Song Contest: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

France
France
Member station RTF (1956-1964)
ORTF (1965-1974)
TF1 (1975-1981)
Antenne 2 (1983-1992)
France 2 (1993-1998)
France 3 (1999-)
Appearances
Appearances 52
First appearance 1956
Best result 1st: 1958, 1960, 1962, 1969, 1977
Worst result 24th: 1998
External links
France 3 page
France's page at Eurovision.tv
Jonatan Cerrada at Istanbul (2004).
Ortal at Kiev (2005)
Les Fatals Picards at Helsinki (2007)
Sébastien Tellier at Belgrade (2008)
Patricia Kaas at Moscow (2009)

France is one of the most successful countries in the Eurovision Song Contest and has entered the competition fifty-two times since their debut at the very first contest in 1956. France is one of only seven countries to be present at the very first contest, and has only been absent from two contests in its history, missing the 1974 and 1982 contests. Despite appearing in the Contest for over 50 years, France has never taken last place, although they ended up placing second to last five times.

France has gone through a number of broadcasters that presented Eurovision to the French. From 1956 to 1964 Radiodiffusion-Télévision Française (RTF) was the French broadcaster. ORTF (Office de Radiodiffusion Télévision Française) took over from RTF in 1965, and showed Eurovision until 1973. TF1 took over from ORTF from 1975 to 1981, when they withdrew. Antenne 2 took over from TF1 in 1983 and its current incarnation, France Télévisions, is the current French broadcaster from 1992.

With the introduction of the semi-final in 2004 France 4 (part of France Télévisions) presents the Eurovision Song Contest semi-final, with France 3 continuing to organise a national selection for the participant song and present the Eurovision Song Contest final.

Contents

Absences

Since their debut in 1956 France has only missed two contests, in 1974 and 1982. In 1974, after selecting a singer and song to represent them at the contest, France withdrew after the President of France Georges Pompidou died in the week of the contest.[1] If they had participated in the contest, France would have been represented by Dani with the song "La vie à vingt-cinq ans".

In November 1981, TF1 declined to enter the Eurovision Song Contest for 1982, with the head of entertainment, Pierre Bouteiller, saying, "The absence of talent and the mediocrity of the songs were where annoyance set in. Eurovision is a monument to inanity [sometimes translated as "drivel"]."[2] Antenne 2 took over the job due to public reaction of TF1's withdraw, hosting a national final to select their entry as well, from the 1983 contest.

Contest history

France is one of the most successful countries in the Eurovision, winning the contest five times, coming second four times and coming third seven times. More over, Amina was close to win with the song "Le Dernier qui a parlé..." in 1991, when she finished at the same points as Sweden. Both countries had an equal number of twelve points, but the profits went to Sweden, when France had fewer 10-points. Today, with the new rules, France would have won the competition, because they got points out of more countries than Sweden. One year before, France was also close to win, when Joëlle Ursull performed Serge Gainsbourg's song "White and Black Blues". The song came second.

However, in recent years, the French results have been somewhat disappointing. Since 1998, when the televoting was invented, France has almost always been in the bottom-10 countries in the final, coming 18th (2003 and 2008), 19th (1999), 22nd (2006 & 2007), 23rd (2000 and 2005) and 24th (1998). Despite this France has never come last in the contest since their debut.

Yet, France have had some good results during the 21st century. In 2001, Canadian singer Natasha St-Pier came 4th for France with her song "Je n'ai que mon âme", being the favourite to win the contest by fans and odds. This good result was carried into the 2002 contest, when Sandrine François came 5th with "Il faut du temps" and received the international press award for the best song and performance. Finally, the positive experience with Sébastien Tellier in 2008 created considerable interest among the French show business for the contest, which resulted in the fact that Eurovision is seen now in the French media as a great advertising campaign and it has been decided that big names will represent France in the future. With these ambitions, the French superstar Patricia Kaas represented France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009 in Moscow, Russia. Kaas is one of the most successful French-speaking singers in the world and she has sold over 16 million records worldwide[3]. She ended in 8th place and as in 2002, she received the international press award for the best song and performance.

France and the 'Big 5'.

Since 1998, four particular countries have automatically qualified for the Eurovision final, regardless of their positions on the scoreboard in previous Contests.[4] They earned this special status by being the four biggest financial contributors to the EBU (without which the production of the Eurovision Song Contest would not be possible). These countries are the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Spain. Due to their untouchable status in the Contest, these countries became known as the "Big Four". Contest Executive Supervisor Svante Stockselius told reporters in a meeting with OGAE Serbia, that if Italy were to return to the contest in the future, that it would also qualify automatically for the finals, becoming part of a "Big Five". [5][6]

Contestants

Year Artist Song Place Points
1956 Mathé Altéry "Le temps perdu" NA NA
1956 Dany Dauberson "Il est là" NA NA
1957 Paule Desjardins "La belle amour" 2 17
1958 André Claveau "Dors, mon amour" 1 27
1959 Jean Philippe "Oui, oui, oui, oui" 3 15
1960 Jacqueline Boyer "Tom Pillibi" 1 32
1961 Jean-Paul Mauric "Printemps, avril carillonne" 4 13
1962 Isabelle Aubret "Un premier amour" 1 26
1963 Alain Barrière "Elle était si jolie" 5 25
1964 Rachel "Le chant de Mallory" 4 14
1965 Guy Mardel "N'avoue jamais" 3 22
1966 Dominique Walter "Chez nous" 16 1
1967 Noëlle Cordier "Il doit faire beau là-bas" 3 20
1968 Isabelle Aubret "La source" 3 20
1969 Frida Boccara "Un jour, un enfant" 1 18
1970 Guy Bonnet "Marie-Blanche" 4 8
1971 Serge Lama "Un jardin sur la terre" 10 82
1972 Betty Mars "Comé-comédie" 10 81
1973 Martine Clemenceau "Sans toi" 15 65
1975 Nicole Rieu "Et bonjour à toi l'artiste" 4 91
1976 Catherine Ferry "Un, deux, trois" 2 147
1977 Marie Myriam "L'oiseau et l'enfant" 1 136
1978 Joël Prévost "Il y aura toujours des violons" 3 119
1979 Anne-Marie David "Je suis l'enfant soleil" 3 106
1980 Profil "Hé, hé M'sieurs dames" 11 45
1981 Jean Gabilou "Humanahum" 3 125
1983 Guy Bonnet "Vivre" 8 56
1984 Annick Thoumazeau "Autant d'amoureux que d'étoiles" 8 61
1985 Roger Bens "Femme dans ses rêves aussi" 10 56
1986 Cocktail Chic "Européennes" 17 13
1987 Christine Minier "Les mots d'amour n'ont pas de dimanche" 14 44
1988 Gérard Lenorman "Chanteur de charme" 10 64
1989 Nathalie Pâque "J'ai volé la vie" 8 60
1990 Joëlle Ursull "White and Black Blues" 2 132
1991 Amina "C'est le dernier qui a parlé qui a raison" 2 146
1992 Kali "Monté la riviè" 8 73
1993 Patrick Fiori "Mama Corsica" 4 121
1994 Nina Morato "Je suis un vrai garçon" 7 71
1995 Nathalie Santamaria "Il me donne rendez-vous" 4 94
1996 Dan Ar Braz & l'Héritage des Celtes "Diwanit Bugale" 19 18
1997 Fanny "Sentiments songes" 7 95
1998 Marie Line "Où aller" 24 3
1999 Nayah "Je veux donner ma voix" 19 14
2000 Sofia Mestari "On aura le ciel" 23 5
2001 Natasha St-Pier "Je n'ai que mon âme" 4 142
2002 Sandrine François "Il faut du temps" 5 104
2003 Louisa Baïleche "Monts et merveilles" 18 19
2004 Jonatan Cerrada "À chaque pas" 15 40
2005 Ortal "Chacun pense à soi" 23 11
2006 Virginie Pouchain "Il était temps" 22 5
2007 Les Fatals Picards "L'amour à la française" 22 19
2008 Sébastien Tellier "Divine" 18 47
2009 Patricia Kaas "Et s'il fallait le faire" 8 107
2010 Jessy Matador[7][8] "Allez! Ola! Olé!"[9]

Voting history (1975-2009)

France has given the most points to...

Rank Country Points
1  Israel 151
2  United Kingdom 145
3  Turkey 134
4  Portugal 128
5  Ireland 99

France has received the most points from...

Rank Country Points
1  Switzerland 139
2  Norway 130
3  Ireland 120
4  Netherlands 119
5  Germany 113

Since the introduction of the televote in 1998, France has frequently awarded relatively high marks to Turkey, Portugal, Israel, and now, Armenia and Serbia; countries with large diasporas in France:

  • 1998 : Israel - 12 points; Portugal - 10 points
  • 1999 : Portugal - 12 points (the only points for Portugal) ; Israel - 10 points
  • 2000 : Turkey - 12 points ; Israel - 6 points (ending with 7 points)
  • 2001 : Portugal - 12 points; Israel - 10 points
  • 2002 : Israel - 10 points; Turkey - 7 points
  • 2003 : Turkey - 10 points; Israel - 8 points
  • 2004 : Turkey - 12 points; Serbia and Montenegro - 10 points
  • 2005 : Turkey - 12 points; Israel - 10 points; Serbia and Montenegro - 6 points
  • 2006 : Turkey - 12 points; Armenia - 10 points; Israel - 4 points (the only points for Israel)
  • 2007 : Turkey - 12 points; Armenia - 10 points; Serbia - 8 points
  • 2008 : Armenia - 12 points; Turkey - 10 points; Portugal - 8 points; Serbia - 7 points; Israel - 6 points
  • 2009 : Turkey - 12 points; Israel - 10 points; Portugal - 7 points; Armenia - 6 points (in 2009, votes were be decided by a combination of 50% televoting results and 50% national jury.)

Hostings

Year Location Venue Presenter
1959 France Cannes Palais des Festivals Jacqueline Joubert
1961 France Cannes Palais des Festivals Jacqueline Joubert
1978 France Paris Palais des Congrès Denise Fabre, Léon Zitrone

References

  1. ^ History - Eurovision Song Contest 1974 Eurovision.tv
  2. ^ 1982 Eurovision source in French
  3. ^ kabaretkaas.com
  4. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy (2005). The Eurovision Song Contest 50 Years The Official History. London: Carlton Books Limited. ISBN 1-84442-586-X. 
  5. ^ http://www.oikotimes.com/v2/index.php?file=articles&id=234
  6. ^ Fulton, Rick (2007-05-14). "The East V West Song Contest". Daily Record. http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/editors-choice/2007/05/14/the-east-v-west-song-contest-86908-19098830/. Retrieved 2009-05-24. 
  7. ^ Hondal, Victor (2010-02-19). "France sends Jessy Matador to Oslo". ESCToday. http://www.esctoday.com/news/read/15138. Retrieved 19 February 2010. 
  8. ^ Schacht, Andreas (2010-02-19). "Jessy Matador to represent France?". European Broadcasting Union. http://www.eurovision.tv/page/news?id=9213&_t=Jessy+Matador+to+represent+France%3F. Retrieved 19 February 2010. 
  9. ^ Dufaut, Dominique (2010-02-24). "Jessy will sing Allez! Ola! Olé!". ESCToday. http://www.esctoday.com/news/read/15198. Retrieved 2010-02-24. 

External links

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