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Franco Scoglio
Personal information
Full name Francesco Scoglio
Date of birth 2 May 1941(1941-05-02)
Place of birth Lipari, Italy
Date of death 3 October 2005 (aged 64)
Place of death Genoa, Italy
Teams managed
Years Team
1972–1973 Reggina (youth team)
1973–1974 Gioiese
1974–1975 Messina
1975–1976 Gioiese
1976–1977 Acireale
1977–1978 Spezia (technical manager)
1978–1979 Reggina
1980–1981 Messina
1981–1982 Gioiese
1982–1983 Reggina
1983–1984 Akragas
1984–1988 Messina
1988–1990 Genoa
1990–1991 Bologna
1991–1992 Udinese
1992–1993 Lucchese
1993 Pescara
1993–1995 Genoa
1995–1996 Torino
1996–1997 Cosenza
1997–1998 Ancona
1998–2001 Tunisia
2001–2002 Genoa
2002 Libya
2002–2003 Napoli

Francesco "Franco" Scoglio (2 May 1941 – 3 October 2005) was an Italian football manager who coached at both national and international level.

Biography

Francesco Scoglio was born in Lipari, in the province of Messina, Italy.

Nicknamed il Professore (the Professor) because of his past teaching activity (he was a pedagogy graduate), Scoglio never actually had a playing career. He started a managing career in 1972 in one of the Reggina youth teams. He then went on coaching at amateur and Serie C levels in Sicily and Calabria (Gioiese, Messina, Acireale, Akragas). It was Scoglio who discovered the great potential of Salvatore Schillaci, one of his players during Scoglio's second stint in Messina.

However, Scoglio is most remembered for his time in Genoa CFC, which was also the team for which he first coached in Serie A. After two enthusiastic years in Genoa, to where he returned in 1993 and 2001, Scoglio did not achieve great success with his next clubs, being often fired before the end of the season. He is also known for having coached the national teams of Tunisia and Libya. His last coaching (and unsuccessful) experience was on 2002–2003 for SSC Napoli.

Scoglio then became a very popular TV commenter on football shows in Italy, and even worked for Al Jazeera as the technical expert reporting on the Italian league.

Death

Franco Scoglio died of a heart attack at 64 years of age while on the air during a program on the Genoan private TV station Primocanale, after a heated discussion over the phone with Genoa chairman Enrico Preziosi. He passed out in his seat while Preziosi continued with his call. Thus, he fulfilled his self-prophecy: "I'll die while talking about Genoa".

References

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Francesco "Franco" Scoglio (May 2, 1941 - October 3, 2005) was an Italian football coach.

Attributed

  • Doping always existed and the footballers are ignorant, in the sense that they ignore elements of chemistry and pharmacology.
  • I do not look the table from the top to the bottom, but obliquely.
  • In this team, I have available duplicates, triplicates, quadruplicates on the same side.
  • The goal we gave away in Bergamo does not exist in football.
  • The president does not exist, the squad does not exists and the club does not exist, but in the absolute way possible: it exists just the supporters and the coach.
  • Genoa C.F.C. is something special, it has its own god...
  • Metals can be melted, feelings cannot.
  • There are 21 ways to take a corner kick, and 12 ways to take a free kick.
  • Today I make a 300 degrees analysis, I hold 60 degress for me.
  • What a lust when I lose. The defeat excites me and makes me savour invaluable stimuli.
  • You can immediately grasp at once if a player is able to do the cross of the rhomb.
  • You, over there, should listen to me. Otherwise, I am here to speak ad minchiam.
    • Note: Ad minchiam is an invented Latinism coined by Scoglio, based on the Southern Italian word "minchia", which means "prick"

External links

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