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Frank McCormick
First baseman
Born: June 9, 1911(1911-06-09)
New York, New York
Died: November 21, 1982 (aged 71)
Manhasset, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
September 11, 1934 for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1948 for the Boston Braves
Career statistics
Batting average     .299
Home runs     128
Runs batted in     951
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Frank Andrew McCormick (June 9, 1911 in New York, NY – November 21, 1982 in Manhasset, NY) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1934, 1937-1945), Philadelphia Phillies (1946-1947) and Boston Braves (1947-1948). McCormick batted and threw right-handed.

Contents

Career

In a 13-season career, McCormick posted a .299 batting average with 128 home runs and 951 RBI in 1534 games played.

In 1958, McCormick became the Reds analyst on WLWT-TV, where he stayed through the 1968 season.

Highlights

  • National League MVP Award in 1940.
  • Nine consecutive times All-Star (1938-1946)
  • Led NL in At Bats (1938 and 1940)
  • Led NL in Hits (1938-40)
  • Led NL in doubles (1940)
  • Led NL in RBI (1939)
  • Led NL in Singles (1939)
  • Led NL in At Bats per Strikeout (1941)
  • Ranks 23rd on MLB Career At Bats per Strikeout List (30.3)
  • Set an MLB first basemen record with 131 straight errorless games (1945-46)
  • Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame Member

Fact

  • Just one of only three NL players with three consecutive hits titles (1938 [209], 1939 [209], 1940 [191]). The others are Ginger Beaumont (1902-04) and Rogers Hornsby (1920-22)

See also

External links

Preceded by
Joe Medwick
National League RBI Champion
1939
Succeeded by
Johnny Mize
Preceded by
Bucky Walters
National League Most Valuable Player
1940
Succeeded by
Dolph Camilli
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