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Frankenstein;
or, The Modern Prometheus  
Frontispiece to Frankenstein 1831.jpg
Illustration from the frontispiece of the 1831 edition by Theodor von Holst[1]
Author Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Horror, Gothic, Romance, science fiction
Publisher Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor & Jones
Publication date 1 January 1818
Pages 280
ISBN N/A
.Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, generally known as Frankenstein, is a novel written by Mary Shelley.^ The popular conception is that the monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus , was named Frankenstein .
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A famous novel by Mary Shelley , the full title is Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (get the full text of the book there!
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A reader of Mary Shelley 's classic novel, Frankenstein (or, The Modern Prometheus) might argue that the many inconsistencies between the book and the movie are a problem.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley started writing the story when she was 18 and the novel was published when she was 20. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France.The title of the novel refers to a scientist, Victor Frankenstein, who learns how to create life and creates a being in the likeness of man, but larger than average and more powerful.^ Frankenstein is more than just any other novel.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Frankenstein is the man who made the monster.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Victor Frankenstein is the student/scientist who animates the "Creature," a far more articulate being than the gutteral monster mis-named "Frankenstein" in the movies.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.In popular culture, people have tended incorrectly to refer to the monster as "Frankenstein". Frankenstein is infused with some elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement.^ A pop culture Pieta: The classic Frankenstein Monster and comic book horror heroine Vampirella, by Kevin Nowlan.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ The monster’s request of Frankenstein to create him a mate is a ...more Most of the people just do not get Frankenstein.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ It does make it harder to connect to the fact that thematically all 5 splats are Frankenstein's Monster, though mechanically only some of them are.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

.It was also a warning against the expansion of modern man in the Industrial Revolution, alluded to in the novel's subtitle, The Modern Prometheus.^ This is the meaning behind the subtitle: the Modern Prometheus.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus , is often thought of as a story of one man's act of playing god and the retribution that ensues.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A reader of Mary Shelley 's classic novel, Frankenstein (or, The Modern Prometheus) might argue that the many inconsistencies between the book and the movie are a problem.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.The story has had an influence across literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories and films.^ Though I would imagine studying the popular culture side of the story would be just as fascinating as studying the book itself.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

Contents

Plot

Walton's early letters

.Frankenstein begins in epistolary form, documenting the correspondence from Captain Robert Walton to his sister, Margaret Walton Saville.^ The novel is recorded by Captain Robert Walton in letters to his sister.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.These letters form the framework of the story in which Walton tells his sister the story of Victor Frankenstein and his creature as Frankenstein tells it to him.^ Frankenstein opens with the mental ly and physically tattered Dr. Victor Frankenstein laying aboard a ship in the arctic , telling his torrid tale to the captain of the ship.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Walton's father banned him from a "sea-faring life"; Frankenstein is repeatedly chided by his sister Elizabeth for detaching himself from the family to pursue his scientific goals.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The story went back to the first person narration of Victor Frankenstein and my dread set in.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

Walton sets out to explore the North Pole and expand his scientific knowledge in hopes of achieving fame and friendship. .Unfortunately, the ship becomes trapped in ice.^ The chase takes them to the northern Alps, and continues across the ice in sleds, before Victor is rescued from an accident and taken on board a ship that has been trapped in the ice.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.One day, the crew observes a being in the stature of a giant man in the distance on a dogsled.^ When he catches sight of the creature on a sledge, Walton observes simply a "being which had the shape of a man but apparently of gigantic stature," and this is close to Frankenstein's original description of his creation as "of a gigantic stature" and "about eight feet in height".
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I have wandered here many days; the caves of ice, which I only do not fear, are a dwelling to me, and the only one which man does not grudge.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ We perceived a low carriage, fixed on a sledge and drawn by dogs, pass on towards the north, at the distance of half a mile; a being which had the shape of a man, but apparently of gigantic stature, sat in the sledge and guided the dogs.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Frankenstein was in pursuit of his monster, when all but one of his dogs from his dogsled died.^ So go visit The Horrors of It All, put yourself in The Monster’s big boots and read Your Name is Frankenstein .
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ Young Frankenstein is not just one of the best comedies of all time, but it is the best movie Mel Brooks has ever made or will ever make.
  • Young Frankenstein | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It does make it harder to connect to the fact that thematically all 5 splats are Frankenstein's Monster, though mechanically only some of them are.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

.He broke apart his dogsled to make oars to row an ice-raft toward the vessel.^ He sprang from the cabin window as he said this, upon the ice raft which lay close to the vessel.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I shall quit your vessel on the ice raft which .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I quickly destroyed part of my sledge to construct oars, and by these means was enabled, with infinite fatigue, to move my ice raft in the direction of your ship.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

Hours later they find Frankenstein, weak and in need of sustenance, near the ship. .Saved by the kind occupants of the ship, Frankenstein starts to recover from his exertion and recounts to Walton his story, warning Walton of the wretched effects of allowing one's ambition to push one to aim beyond what one is capable of achieving.^ Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus , is often thought of as a story of one man's act of playing god and the retribution that ensues.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Page v      The Publishers of the Standard Novels, in selecting "Frankenstein" for one of their series, expressed a wish that I should furnish them with some account of the origin of the story.

^ As evadyne touches on above, Shelley's original novel is related by Dr. Frankenstein to a ship's captain , Robert Walton .
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

Victor's narrative

.Victor Frankenstein begins by telling Walton of his childhood.^ Frankenstein opens with the mental ly and physically tattered Dr. Victor Frankenstein laying aboard a ship in the arctic , telling his torrid tale to the captain of the ship.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Frankenstein, however, tells his whole story to Walton by way of a cautionary tale , so that he may avoid the same fate.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It is interesting to note how the characters differ in their reaction to their despair; Walton tells his sister and Frankenstein about it, but does little to remedy the situation.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.Frankenstein was raised by a wealthy family, and was always encouraged to seek a greater understanding of the world around him (in science), whilst remaining in a safe environment surrounded by loving family and friends.^ I was overcome by gloom and misery and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He lost no time in endeavouring to seek him out, with the hope of persuading him to begin the world again through his credit and assistance.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ You and your family are the friends whom I seek.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Frankenstein grew up with close ties to Elizabeth Lavenza, an orphan brought to his family who is raised with Frankenstein like a sister.^ I mean, I suppose the pretty factors into it, but it's not like Frankenstein's monster is going to make a Muse by just stitching up a body as pretty as tree.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Walton's father banned him from a "sea-faring life"; Frankenstein is repeatedly chided by his sister Elizabeth for detaching himself from the family to pursue his scientific goals.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The creature has already killed Frankenstein's brother and best friend, and our genius doctor is like, "Elizabeth, my darling!
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.As a young boy, Frankenstein becomes obsessed with studying outdated theories of science that focus on achieving natural wonders.^ There only remained a resolution to return to my ancient studies and to devote myself to a science for which I believed myself to possess a natural talent.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In Frankenstein, Victor becomes so obsessed with bringing a c ...more Just finished reading Frankenstein today.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ I discount both theories, but taken and studied together, I find I am able to make sense of how we have become our current selves.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.He plans to attend university at Ingolstadt, Germany when a week before departure his mother and sister, Elizabeth, become very ill with scarlet fever.^ Elizabeth had caught the scarlet fever; her illness was severe, and she was in the greatest danger.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Before leaving Ingolstadt in Germany, where he was living and studying at the university, he receives a letter from his father telling him that his little brother William has been murdered.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ When I had attained the age of seventeen my parents resolved that I should become a student at the university of Ingolstadt.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

Elizabeth recovers, but Victor's mother dies from the disease. The whole family is in grief, and Frankenstein views it as his first misfortune. .At university, he excels at chemistry and other sciences and discovers the secret to imbuing the inanimate with life, in part by studying how life decays.^ He was an uncouth man, but deeply imbued in the secrets of his science.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Frankenstein, on the other hand, wants to unlock the most profound secrets of life .
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During one of these, various philosophical doctrines were discussed, and among others the nature of the principle of life, and whether there was any probability of its ever being discovered and communicated.

He also becomes interested in galvanism, a technique discovered in the 1790s.
.While the exact details of the monster's construction are left somewhat ambiguous, Frankenstein explains in the novel that he collected bones from charnel-houses, and "disturbed, with profane fingers, the tremendous secrets of the human frame."^ I collected bones from charnel-houses and .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I collected bones from charnel-houses and disturbed, with profane fingers, the tremendous secrets of the human frame.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Nonetheless, it is fair to say that, within the time frame of the novel, Frankenstein experiences failure while Walton at least avoids it, even if he does not taste success.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.He also notes that the dissecting room and the slaughter-house furnished many of his materials.^ The dissecting room and the slaughter-house furnished many of my materials; and often did my human nature turn with loathing from my occupation, whilst, still urged on by an eagerness which perpetually increased, I brought my work near to a conclusion.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Frankenstein explains that he has been forced to make the monster much larger than a normal man, in part because of the difficulty in replicating the minute parts of the human body.^ Description: Boris Karloff became a star playing the monster created by mad scientist Dr. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive), who uses pillaged human brains and cadavers to play God by making new life.
  • Frankenstein - Trailer | SPIKE 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ I mean, I suppose the pretty factors into it, but it's not like Frankenstein's monster is going to make a Muse by just stitching up a body as pretty as tree.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ When man takes to himself this right, as in the French Revolution, they make a monster that begins to destroy the lives and liberties that they meant to protect.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.After giving the monster life, Frankenstein, disgusted by and fearful of the monster's appearance, flees.^ I give you The Beautiful Monster: The Bride of Frankenstein.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

.After his exhausting and secretive efforts to create a human life, Frankenstein is nursed by his childhood friend Henry Clerval and recovers from his illness after four months.^ Description: Boris Karloff became a star playing the monster created by mad scientist Dr. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive), who uses pillaged human brains and cadavers to play God by making new life.
  • Frankenstein - Trailer | SPIKE 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ It was your journal of the four months that preceded my creation.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

.He determines to come home when his five-year-old brother William is found murdered.^ When I was about five years old, while making an excursion beyond the .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Before leaving Ingolstadt in Germany, where he was living and studying at the university, he receives a letter from his father telling him that his little brother William has been murdered.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ When I was about five years old, while making an excursion beyond the frontiers of Italy, they passed a week on the shores of the Lake of Como.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.Elizabeth blames herself for William's death, as she let William wear his mother's locket.^ She told me that that same evening William had teased her to let him wear a very valuable miniature that she possessed of your mother.

^ She told me, that that same evening William had teased her to let him wear a very valuable miniature that she possessed of your mother.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.William's nanny Justine is accused and hanged.^ A servant girl, Justine, is accused and hanged for the crime, and Victor goes traipsing off into the wilderness with his depression.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.In reality, it was the creature who murdered William and then placed the locket into Justine's coat.^ William, the execution of Justine, the murder of Clerval, and lastly .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On his arrival to his home town, he sees his creature in the dark wilderness, and becomes convinced it murdered William.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ The Golem, meanwhile, isn't in the myth a playable character at all - he's a mindless creature who the Rabbi turns into inert clay when he gets out of hand.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

.After several harsh encounters with humans, the monster becomes afraid of them and spends a year living near a cottage, observing the the De Lacey family, who live there.^ Prometheans are monsters trying to become human.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ Though it turns to a vengeful killing spree against its hated creator's family, the monster is actually a pitiable creature, human in that it is agitated by the same doubts that plague humanity.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.Through these observations he becomes educated and self-aware, realizing that he is very different in physical appearance from the humans he watches.^ I still like the "need to pass on the Azoth so that yours doesn't burn so hot that you can't become human" idea, m'self.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ He begins his 'life' as this gentle creature, and then due to his horrid appearance and experiences with the first humans he meets, be becomes bitter and resentful of all humankind.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ So endearing these moods have become, that I should almost provoke them for the joy of watching her shift of expression spring from her darling little heart.

In loneliness, the monster seeks to befriend the De Laceys. .The family had previously been wealthy, but were forced into exile when Felix De Lacey rescues the father of his beloved, Safie.^ By some papers of her father which fell into her hands she heard of the exile of her lover and learnt the name of the spot where he then resided.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I never saw any of the family of De Lacey more.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Felix darted forward, and with supernatural force tore me from his father, to whose knees I clung, in a transport of fury, he dashed me to the ground and struck me violently with a stick.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

The father, a Turkish merchant, had been wrongfully accused of a crime and sentenced to death. .Once rescued, the merchant father agrees to allow Felix to marry Safie.^ "Safie related that her mother was a Christian Arab, seized and made a slave by the Turks; recommended by her beauty, she had won the heart of the father of Safie, who married her.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.However, he loathes the idea of his beloved daughter marrying a Christian and flees with his daughter.^ He loathed the idea that his daughter should be united to a .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He loathed the idea that his daughter should be united to a Christian, but he feared the resentment of Felix if he should appear lukewarm, for he knew that he was still in the power of his deliverer if he should choose to betray him to the Italian state which they inhabited.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

Eager for the freedom of European women, Safie returns. .Eventually, the monster tries to befriend the family, but they are afraid of him, and this rejection makes him seek vengeance against his creator.^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ If I do, swear to me, Walton, that he shall not escape, that you will seek him and satisfy my vengeance in his death.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ [Furthermore], Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation."

He travels to Geneva and meets a little boy in the woods. .In the vain hope that because the boy is still young and potentially unaffected by older humans' perception of his hideousness, the monster hopes to abduct him and keep him as a companion, but the boy reveals himself as a relation of Frankenstein.^ Walton's father banned him from a "sea-faring life"; Frankenstein is repeatedly chided by his sister Elizabeth for detaching himself from the family to pursue his scientific goals.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thankfully, the stalwart Frankenstein Monster quickly arrives and chokes him to death.
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The monster’s request of Frankenstein to create him a mate is a ...more Most of the people just do not get Frankenstein.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.Upon seeing the monster, the boy yells many insults, angering the monster.^ He fell in love with monster movies upon seeing Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein when he was 12.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ However, upon seeing the Monster standing rooted in one spot while swinging his torso and making grrr sounds, Melvin flees the room.
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

In an attempt to reason with the boy, the monster tries to cover the boy's mouth to silence him, but accidentally kills him by asphyxiation. .Although not his original intent, the monster takes it as his first act of vengeance against his creator.^ Like a mother who is not yet ready for her child, he broke down and acted in a way to make a monster of his creation.

.The monster removes a necklace from the dead boy's body and plants it on a sleeping girl, Justine Moritz, the Frankensteins' trusted servant who is like a member of the family.^ Frankenstein is the man who made the monster.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Frankenstein sounded just like his monster, who sounded just like the Captain, etc.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

Justine is found with the necklace and confesses to the murder. She is put on trial and found guilty. .The judges at the trial are noted for their dislike of executing people when there is any doubt; however, later, under threats of excommunication, Justine confesses to the murder and is executed.^ William, the execution of Justine, the murder of Clerval, and lastly .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

.When Frankenstein learns of his brother's death, he returns to Geneva to be with his family.^ Eventually, he matures and learns the language of the DeLacey family, whom he observes after he flees from Frankenstein.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And it is in Frankenstein's death, that the Creature returns to his metaphorical origins, that he shall "seek the most northern extremity of the globe " and "ascend [his] funeral pile triumphantly" (197,198).
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I repassed, in my memory, my whole life -- my quiet happiness while residing with my family in Geneva, the death of my mother, and my departure for Ingolstadt.

.Frankenstein sees the monster in the woods where his young brother was murdered, and becomes certain that the monster is William's murderer.^ He fell in love with monster movies upon seeing Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein when he was 12.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ "I remember, the first time that I did this, the young woman, when she opened the door in the morning, appeared greatly astonished on seeing a great pile of wood on the outside.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ The text suggests that Frankenstein obsesses himself with his quest to create the monster as, in your eyes, I have obsessed myself with the murder of Harriet.

.Ravaged by his grief and guilt for creating the monster who wreaked so much destruction, Frankenstein retreats into the mountains alone to find peace.^ Description: Boris Karloff became a star playing the monster created by mad scientist Dr. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive), who uses pillaged human brains and cadavers to play God by making new life.
  • Frankenstein - Trailer | SPIKE 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ I mean, I suppose the pretty factors into it, but it's not like Frankenstein's monster is going to make a Muse by just stitching up a body as pretty as tree.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

.After a time in solitude, the monster approaches Frankenstein.^ The monster Frankenstein rises again, and this time his mad scientist creator has taken it upon...
  • Frankenstein - Trailer | SPIKE 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ We were also collectively annoyed that after Frankenstein devotes so much time in solitude to "breathing life" into this creature, once the monster finally comes to life we a) don't get an explanation of how it happened, just that it happened.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Lugosi played opposite The Monster one more time, as Dracula, commanding Glenn Strange is Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein , in 1948.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

.Initially furious and intent on killing the monster, Frankenstein attempts to spring on him, but the far larger and more agile monster eludes him, leading Frankenstein to compose himself.^ Thankfully, the stalwart Frankenstein Monster quickly arrives and chokes him to death.
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1943, Lugosi finally accepted the part that had eluded him twelve years earlier when he donned the heavy monster makeup for Frankenstein Meets The Wolfman .
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ Lugosi played opposite The Monster one more time, as Dracula, commanding Glenn Strange is Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein , in 1948.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

.The monster delivers a lengthy narrative of his short life, beginning with his creation, which fashions an impression of him as an initially harmless innocent whom humans have abused into wretchedness.^ Had he not seen the monster while he was creating him?
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Description: Boris Karloff became a star playing the monster created by mad scientist Dr. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive), who uses pillaged human brains and cadavers to play God by making new life.
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^ He begins his 'life' as this gentle creature, and then due to his horrid appearance and experiences with the first humans he meets, be becomes bitter and resentful of all humankind.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.He concludes his story with a demand that Frankenstein create for him a female companion, reasoning that no human will accept his existence and character due to his hideous outward appearance.^ He begins his 'life' as this gentle creature, and then due to his horrid appearance and experiences with the first humans he meets, be becomes bitter and resentful of all humankind.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ The monster returns and pledges his own suicide by fire, since there is no more reason for him to live.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ The monster’s request of Frankenstein to create him a mate is a ...more Most of the people just do not get Frankenstein.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.The monster argues that as a living thing, he has a right to happiness and that Frankenstein, as his creator, has a duty to oblige him.^ His monster only hurt him when he scorned it, assuming it as inhuman, incapable of living as he.

^ I thought that as I could not sympathize with him, I had no right to withhold from him the small portion of happiness which was yet in my power to bestow.

^ In a fit of enthusiastic madness I created a rational creature and was bound towards him to assure, as far as was in my power, his happiness and well-being.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

He promises never to reappear in his life if Frankenstein does this for him.
.Fearing for his family, Frankenstein reluctantly agrees and travels to England to do his work.^ I do not deny feeling a prick of fear in continuing the work of Frankenstein.

Clerval accompanies Frankenstein, but they separate in Scotland. .In the process of creating a second being on the Orkney Islands, Frankenstein is plagued by the notion of the carnage another monster could wreak and destroys the unfinished project.^ If he could only have found himself in his creation, in being the monster...well...his folly is the real warning, not Faust's.

^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ This also ties in with my dislike of creating another Promethean being a perequisite of the Pilgramage.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

.The monster witnesses this event and vows revenge on Frankenstein's upcoming wedding night.^ Its canvas night skies droop; a microphone throws a shadow across the scene at the dungeon door where Frankenstein and Waldman prepare to ambush The Monster.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ He had vowed TO BE WITH ME ON MY WEDDING-NIGHT, yet he did not consider .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

.Before Frankenstein returns to Ireland, the monster murders Clerval.^ "After the murder of Clerval I returned to Switzerland, heart-broken .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The image of Clerval was forever before me, ghastly and murdered.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ My return had only been delayed so long from an unwillingness to leave Clerval in a strange place before he had become acquainted with any of its inhabitants.

Once arriving in Ireland, Frankenstein is imprisoned for the crime, and falls violently ill. After being acquitted and with his health renewed, Frankenstein returns home with his father.
.Once home, Frankenstein marries his cousin Elizabeth and, possessing full knowledge of and belief in the monster's threat, prepares for a fight to the death with the monster.^ If the monster executed his threat, death was inevitable; .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thankfully, the stalwart Frankenstein Monster quickly arrives and chokes him to death.
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If the monster executed his threat, death was inevitable; yet, again, I considered whether my marriage would hasten my fate.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

He doesn't want Elizabeth to be frightened at the sight of the monster, so he asks her to stay in her room for the night. The monster nevertheless kills Elizabeth. .Grief stricken by the deaths of his wife, William, Justine, Clerval and Elizabeth, Frankenstein's father dies.^ William, Elizabeth, and my father .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ William, the execution of Justine, the murder of Clerval, and lastly .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I wished to see him again, that I might wreak the utmost extent of abhorrence on his head and avenge the deaths of William and Justine.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Frankenstein then vows to pursue the monster until one of them destroys the other.^ Lugosi played opposite The Monster one more time, as Dracula, commanding Glenn Strange is Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein , in 1948.
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

^ Meanwhile, all of Mitchells scenes take place in his cell (until later in the film, when he appears on one other set).
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

.Over months of pursuit, the two end up in the Arctic Circle near the North Pole.^ "But my toils now drew near a close, and in two months from this time I reached the environs of Geneva.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

Walton's later writings

.Here, Frankenstein's narrative ends and Captain Walton reassumes the telling of the story.^ Here’s a synopsis of the Seven Soldiers' Frankenstein story arc on Wiki, and a mind-bogglingly detailed overview on the Wiki-like Barbelith .
  • Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog: 10/01/2007 - 11/01/2007 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC frankensteinia.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

.A few days after Frankenstein finishes his story, Walton and his crew decide to turn back and go home, since they cannot break through the ice.^ As I said, the first few pages are pretty interesting stuff with the ambulance crew arguing back and forth with the doctor who refuses to believe that the person that they’re bringing in could possibly be alive if she has no vitals.
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I cannot guess how many days have passed since then, but I have endured .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Now if they could only go back and re-tool their concepts and visuals a bit PARIAH could actually be something interesting.
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

As Frankenstein dies, the monster appears in his room. .Walton hears the monster's adamant justification for his vengeance as well as expressions of remorse before he leaves the ship and travels toward the Pole to destroy himself on his own funeral pyre so that no others will ever know of his existence.^ Yet, although unhappy, he is not so utterly occupied by his own misery but that he interests himself deeply in the projects of others.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ The prospect of such an occupation made every other circumstance of existence pass before me like a dream, and that thought only had to me the reality of life.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

Composition

.
Draft of Frankenstein ("It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld my man completed ..."
^ It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Nothing could be more complete than the alteration that had taken place in my feelings since the night of the appearance of the demon.

)
.
How I, then a young girl, came to think of, and to dilate upon, so very hideous an idea?^ I am the more willing to comply, because I shall thus give a general answer to the question, so very frequently asked me -- "How I, then a young girl, came to think of, and to dilate upon, so very hideous an idea?"

^ I was scarcely hid when a young girl came running towards the spot where I was concealed, laughing, as if she ran from someone in sport.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

[2]
.During the rainy summer of 1816, the "Year Without a Summer," the world was locked in a long cold volcanic winter caused by the eruption of Mount Tambora in 1815.[3] Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, aged 18, and her lover (and later husband) Percy Bysshe Shelley, visited Lord Byron at the Villa Diodati by Lake Geneva in Switzerland.^ Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, 1797-1851 .

^ I passed the summer of 1816 in the environs of Geneva.

^ In the summer of 1816, we visited Switzerland, and became the neighbours of Lord Byron.

The weather was consistently too cold and dreary that summer to enjoy the outdoor holiday activities they had planned, so the group retired indoors until dawn.
.Amongst other subjects, the conversation turned to galvanism and the feasibility of returning a corpse or assembled body parts to life, and to the experiments of the 18th-century natural philosopher and poet Erasmus Darwin, who was said to have animated dead matter.^ After all, both assembled monstrous creations from the dead parts of others.
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Return as heroes who have fought and conquered and who know not what it is to turn their backs on the foe.

^ Now I guess I have to make my own Little Wooden Boy RPG. Not that it matters, but in my head the splats were: Made of severed body parts, corpses etc Made of dead people brought back to life Made of minerals, of the earth Made of works of art Made of puppets or dolls .
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

[4] .Sitting around a log fire at Byron's villa, the company also amused themselves by reading German ghost stories, prompting Byron to suggest they each write their own supernatural tale.^ We will each write a ghost story, said Lord Byron; and his proposition was acceded to.

^ Two other friends (a tale from the pen of one of whom would be far more acceptable to the public than anything I can ever hope to produce) and myself agreed to write each a story founded on some supernatural occurrence.

^ Some volumes of ghost stories, translated from the German into French, fell into our hands.

Shortly afterwards, in a waking dream, Mary Godwin conceived the idea for Frankenstein:
.
I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together.^ I saw -- with shut eyes, but acute mental vision, -- I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together.

.I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half vital motion.^ As soon as he showed signs of life we .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ "Then I fancy we have seen him, for the day before we picked you up we saw some dogs drawing a sledge, with a man in it, across the ice."
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I mean, if someone is passed out and shows no sign of life then how would an EMS worker assume she was still alive in the first place?
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Frightful must it be; for SUPREMELY frightful would be the effect of any human endeavour to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world.^ Frightful must it be; for supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavour to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world.

^ One thing is clear, we must create we must unravel this disjointed universe around us and believe in our position as human beings to control the shapes we draw out of the world.

^ Would you also create for yourself and the world a demoniacal enemy?
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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[5]
She began writing what she assumed would be a short story. .With Percy Shelley's encouragement, she expanded this tale into a full-fledged novel.^ I looked into the writer and the others that were involved with creating this twisted horror story, and it was then that I came upon a letter written to Mary Shelley from her "husband to be" Percy.

[6] .She later described that summer in Switzerland as the moment "when I first stepped out from childhood into life".[7] Byron managed to write just a fragment based on the vampire legends he heard while travelling the Balkans, and from this John Polidori created The Vampyre (1819), the progenitor of the romantic vampire literary genre.^ At that moment I heard the steps of my younger protectors.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ With every genetically altered life I brought into the world, I was fulfilling the role of a creator.

^ Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.Thus, two legendary horror tales originated from this one circumstance.^ My tale was not one to announce publicly; its astounding horror would be looked upon as madness by the vulgar.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Mary's and Percy Bysshe Shelley's manuscripts for the first three-volume edition in 1818 (written 1816–1817), as well as Mary Shelley's fair copy for her publisher, are now housed in the Bodleian Library in Oxford.^ Hannah: Well, it's a letter that proves "Percy Shelley murdered his wife [Harriet], and then construed it as a suicide.

^ I looked into the writer and the others that were involved with creating this twisted horror story, and it was then that I came upon a letter written to Mary Shelley from her "husband to be" Percy.

^ Investigation showed the diary to house journal entries by Ianthe Shelley, the daughter from Percy Shelley’s first marriage, to Harriet Shelley.

The Bodleian acquired the papers in 2004, and they belong now to the Abinger Collection.[8] .On 1 October 2008, the Bodleian published a new edition of Frankenstein which contains comparisons of Mary Shelley's original text with Percy Shelley's additions and interventions alongside.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Page v      The Publishers of the Standard Novels, in selecting "Frankenstein" for one of their series, expressed a wish that I should furnish them with some account of the origin of the story.

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

The new edition is edited by Charles E. Robinson: The Original Frankenstein (ISBN 978-1851243969).[9]

Publication

.Mary Shelley completed her writing in May 1817, and Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was first published on 1 January 1818 by the small London publishing house of Harding, Mavor & Jones.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ About the print version Frankenstein Mary Shelley Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley London 1831 Note: Specific origin of the text is unclear, although it is clearly the 1831 version.

.It was issued anonymously, with a preface written for Mary by Percy Bysshe Shelley and with a dedication to philosopher William Godwin, her father.^ The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley Project Gutenberg's Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I looked into the writer and the others that were involved with creating this twisted horror story, and it was then that I came upon a letter written to Mary Shelley from her "husband to be" Percy.

^ Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley .
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

It was published in an edition of just 500 copies in three volumes, the standard "triple-decker" format for 19th century first editions. The novel had been previously rejected by Percy Bysshe Shelley's publisher, Charles Ollier and by Byron's publisher John Murray.
.The second edition of Frankenstein was published on 11 August 1823 in two volumes (by G. and W. B. Whittaker), and this time credited Mary Shelley as the author.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Not many knew of the extreme laudanum addiction, the madness, it is clear in his papers that by the end of August 1823, he actually thought he was both Frankenstein and monster.

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

.On 31 October 1831, the first "popular" edition in one volume appeared, published by Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley.^ Pagination has been taken from the 1831 revised text (London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1831).

^ About the print version Frankenstein Mary Shelley Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley London 1831 Note: Specific origin of the text is unclear, although it is clearly the 1831 version.

.This edition was quite heavily revised by Mary Shelley, and included a new, longer preface by her, presenting a somewhat embellished version of the genesis of the story.^ The banks of the Thames presented a new scene; they were flat but fertile, and almost every town was marked by the remembrance of some story.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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.This edition tends to be the one most widely read now, although editions containing the original 1818 text are still being published.^ I spend my time reading now, most of the time that is, trying to trace just when meaning died for the world.

^ Promethean's not having the memories or personalities of their "parts" is nice, but still it leaves the implication that this being was once human, and is seeking to go back to its origin.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ But I have one want which I have never yet been able to satisfy, and the absence of the object of which I now feel as a most severe evil.

In fact, many scholars prefer the 1818 edition. .They argue that it preserves the spirit of Shelley's original publication (see Anne K. Mellor's "Choosing a Text of Frankenstein to Teach" in the W.W. Norton Critical edition).^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ About the print version Frankenstein Mary Shelley Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley London 1831 Note: Specific origin of the text is unclear, although it is clearly the 1831 version.

^ The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley Project Gutenberg's Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
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Name origins

Frankenstein's creation

An English editorial cartoonist conceived the Irish as akin to Frankenstein's monster; illustration from an 1843 issue of Punch.[10]
.Part of Frankenstein's rejection of his creation is the fact that he does not give it a name, which gives it a lack of identity.^ It does make it harder to connect to the fact that thematically all 5 splats are Frankenstein's Monster, though mechanically only some of them are.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ So every demiurge trying to make a Promethean from a bag of body parts will have to use electricity (the element of fire), and those demiurges will created Frankensteins.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Morrison even opts to eschew the usual pedantic author's conceit of stressing for the reader that "Frankenstein" is the name of the CREATOR of the monster and not the monster itself.
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Instead it is referred to by words such as "monster", "daemon", "fiend", "wretch" and "it". When Frankenstein converses with the monster in Chapter 10, he addresses it as "vile insect", "abhorred monster", "fiend", "wretched devil" and "abhorred devil".
During a telling of Frankenstein, Shelley referred to the creature as "Adam".[11] Shelley was referring to the first man in the Garden of Eden, as in her epigraph:
Did I request thee, Maker from my clay
To mould Me man? Did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me?
John Milton, Paradise Lost (X.743–5)
The monster has often been mistakenly called "Frankenstein." In 1908 one author said "It is strange to note how well-nigh universally the term "Frankenstein" is misused, even by intelligent people, as describing some hideous monster...".[12] Edith Wharton's The Reef (1916) describes an unruly child as an "infant Frankenstein."[13] David Lindsay's "The Bridal Ornament," published in The Rover, 12 June 1844, mentioned "the maker of poor Frankenstein." After the release of James Whale's popular 1931 film Frankenstein, the public at large began speaking of the monster itself as "Frankenstein." A reference to this occurs in Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and in several subsequent films in the series, as well as in film titles such as Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein.

Frankenstein

.Mary Shelley maintained that she derived the name "Frankenstein" from a dream-vision.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

Despite her public claims of originality, the significance of the name has been a source of speculation. Literally, in German, the name Frankenstein means "stone of the Franks." The name is associated with various places such as Castle Frankenstein (Burg Frankenstein), which Mary Shelley had seen while on a boat before writing the novel. Frankenstein is also a town in the region of Palatinate; and before 1946, Ząbkowice Śląskie, a city in Silesia, Poland, was known as Frankenstein in Schlesien.
.More recently, Radu Florescu, in his book In Search of Frankenstein, argued that Mary and Percy Shelley visited Castle Frankenstein on their way to Switzerland, near Darmstadt along the Rhine, where a notorious alchemist named Konrad Dippel had experimented with human bodies, but that Mary suppressed mentioning this visit, to maintain her public claim of originality.^ I replied carelessly, and partly in contempt, mentioned the names of my alchemists as the principal authors I had studied.
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^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
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^ Switzerland with you; I crept along the shores of the Rhine, among .
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.A recent literary essay[14] by A.J. Day supports Florescu's position that Mary Shelley knew of, and visited Castle Frankenstein[15] before writing her debut novel.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

.Day includes details of an alleged description of the Frankenstein castle that exists in Mary Shelley's 'lost' journals.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

However, this theory is not without critics; Frankenstein expert Leonard Wolf calls it an "unconvincing...conspiracy theory."[16] and the 'lost journals' as well as Florescu's claims could not be verified.[17]

Victor

.A possible interpretation of the name Victor derives from Paradise Lost by John Milton, a great influence on Shelley (a quotation from Paradise Lost is on the opening page of Frankenstein and Shelley even allows the monster himself to read it).^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Morrison even opts to eschew the usual pedantic author's conceit of stressing for the reader that "Frankenstein" is the name of the CREATOR of the monster and not the monster itself.
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Milton frequently refers to God as "the Victor" in Paradise Lost, and Shelley sees Victor as playing God by creating life.^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

^ [Furthermore], Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation."

In addition to this, Shelley's portrayal of the monster owes much to the character of Satan in Paradise Lost; indeed, the monster says, after reading the epic poem, that he empathises with Satan's role in the story.
.There are many similarities between Victor and Percy Shelley, Mary's husband.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ In between, there are many shades of grey, and I get why for some people, Galateids not being statue-people matters.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ I looked into the writer and the others that were involved with creating this twisted horror story, and it was then that I came upon a letter written to Mary Shelley from her "husband to be" Percy.

.Victor was a pen name of Percy Shelley's, as in the collection of poetry he wrote with his sister Elizabeth, Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire.^ Hear him not; call on the names of William, Justine, Clerval, Elizabeth, my father, and of the wretched Victor, and thrust your sword into his heart.
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[18] .There is speculation that one of Mary Shelley's models for Victor Frankenstein was Percy, who at Eton had "experimented with electricity and magnetism as well as with gunpowder and numerous chemical reactions," and whose rooms at Oxford were filled with scientific equipment.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

[19] .Percy Shelley was the first-born son of a wealthy country squire with strong political connections and a descendant of Sir Bysshe Shelley, 1st Baronet of Castle Goring, and Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel.^ Investigation showed the diary to house journal entries by Ianthe Shelley, the daughter from Percy Shelley’s first marriage, to Harriet Shelley.

[20] .Victor's family is one of the most distinguished of that republic and his ancestors were counsellors and syndics.^ I am by birth a Genevese, and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic.
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^ My ancestors had been for many years counsellors and syndics, and my father had filled several public situations with honour and reputation.
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Percy had a sister named Elizabeth. .Victor had an adopted sister, named Elizabeth.^ Hear him not; call on the names of William, Justine, Clerval, Elizabeth, my father, and of the wretched Victor, and thrust your sword into his heart.
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On 22 February 1815, Mary Shelley delivered a two-month premature baby and the baby died two weeks later. Percy did not care about the condition of this premature infant and left with Claire, Mary's stepsister, for a lurid affair.[21] .When Victor saw the creature come to life he fled the apartment, though the newborn creature approached him, as a child would a parent.^ You would not if you saw him.
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^ I would reconcile him to life, but he repulses the idea.
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The question of Victor's responsibility to the creature is one of the main themes of the book.

Modern Prometheus

.The Modern Prometheus is the novel's subtitle (though some modern publishings of the work now drop the subtitle, mentioning it only in an introduction).^ It does make it harder to connect to the fact that thematically all 5 splats are Frankenstein's Monster, though mechanically only some of them are.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Page v      The Publishers of the Standard Novels, in selecting "Frankenstein" for one of their series, expressed a wish that I should furnish them with some account of the origin of the story.

^ When actuated by selfish and vicious motives, I asked you to undertake my unfinished work, and I renew this request now, when I am only induced by reason and virtue.
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Prometheus, in some versions of Greek mythology, was the Titan who created mankind. It was also Prometheus who then secretly took fire from heaven and gave it to man. .When Zeus discovered this, he eternally punished Prometheus by fixing him to a rock where each day a predatory bird came to devour his liver, only for the liver to regrow the next day; ready for the bird to come again, until Heracles (Hercules) releases him.^ "Do not let this letter disturb you; do not answer tomorrow, or the next day, or even until you come, if it will give you pain.
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Prometheus was also a myth told in Latin but was a very different story. .In this version Prometheus makes man from clay and water, again a very relevant theme to Frankenstein as Victor rebels against the laws of nature (how life is naturally made) and as a result is punished by his creation.^ A man would make but a very .
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^ A man would make but a very sorry chemist if he attended to that department of human knowledge alone.
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^ God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance.
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In 1910, Edison Studios released the
first motion-picture adaptation of Shelley's story.
The Titan in the Greek mythology of Prometheus parallels Victor Frankenstein. .Victor's work by creating man by new means reflects the same innovative work of the Titan in creating humans.^ Christian A 09-02-2006, 09:21 AM On the topic of making humans creating prometheans more common: The solution, as it were, is to categorize demiurges the same way Prometheans are.
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^ Creating the works from public domain print editions means that no .
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^ When I reflected on the work I had completed, no less a one than the creation of a sensitive and rational animal, I could not rank myself with the herd of common projectors.
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.Victor, in a way, stole the secret of creation from God just as the Titan stole fire from heaven to give to man.^ Perhaps it is too simplistic to see this as almost a dialog between man and God, but I don't think the parallel can be ignored, especially when he keeps referring to him as his creator.

^ I remembered also the nervous fever with which I had been seized just at the time that I dated my creation, and which would give an air of delirium to a tale otherwise so utterly improbable.
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Both the Titan and Victor get punished for their actions. .Victor is reprimanded by suffering the loss of those close to him and having the dread of himself getting killed by his creation.^ Like one who, on a lonely road, Doth walk in fear and dread, And, having once turned round, walks on, And turns no more his head; Because he knows a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
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^ Need I explain that Victor, who, discovering the monster that he created to be so very different from his vision, destroyed his life, his family, and himself, along with his creation?

^ It also seems that, as Frankenstein destroyed the lives of those surrounding him with his evil creation, you believe I have begun to and will ultimately destroy the lives of all those whom I have involved in my plot.

.For Mary Shelley, Prometheus was not a hero but rather something of a devil, whom she blamed for bringing fire to man and thereby seducing the human race to the vice of eating meat (fire brought cooking which brought hunting and killing).^ I had money with me and gained the friendship of the villagers by distributing it; or I brought with me some food that I had killed, which, after taking a small part, I always presented to those who had provided me with fire and utensils for cooking.
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[22] .Support for this claim may be reflected in Chapter 17 of the novel, where the "monster" speaks to Victor Frankenstein: "My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment."^ "My dear Victor, do not speak thus.
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^ My dear Victor, do not speak thus.

^ My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment.
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For Romantic Era artists in general, Prometheus' gift to man echoed the two great utopian promises of the 18th century: the Industrial Revolution and the French Revolution, containing both great promise and potentially unknown horrors.
Byron was particularly attached to the play Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, and Percy Shelley would soon write his own Prometheus Unbound (1820). .The term "Modern Prometheus" was actually coined by Immanuel Kant, referring to Benjamin Franklin and his then recent experiments with electricity.^ After having made a few preparatory experiments, he concluded with a panegyric upon modern chemistry, the terms of which I shall never forget: .

[23]

Shelley's sources

.Shelley incorporated a number of different sources into her work, one of which was the Promethean myth from Ovid.^ You would not call it murder if you could precipitate me into one of those ice-rifts and destroy my frame, the work of your own hands.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I for one became so engrossed into my work that I quickly lost perspective of its consequences.

.The influence of John Milton's Paradise Lost, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the books the Creature finds in the cabin, are also clearly evident within the novel.^ Clerval continued talking for some time about our mutual friends and his own Note: * Coleridge's "Ancient Mariner."

^ Fortunately the books were written in the language, the elements of which I had acquired at the cottage; they, consisted of Paradise Lost, a volume of Plutarch's Lives, and the Sorrows of Werter.

^ Fortunately the books were written in the language, the elements of which I had acquired at the cottage; they consisted of Paradise Lost, a volume of Plutarch's Lives, and the Sorrows of Werter.
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Also, both Shelleys had read William Thomas Beckford's Gothic novel Vathek..September 2009" style="white-space:nowrap;">[citation needed] Frankenstein also contains multiple references to her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, and her major work A Vindication of the Rights of Woman which discusses the lack of equal education for males and females.^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

^ The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley Project Gutenberg's Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
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^ I have been reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley for some hints because it is the only reference I understand so far.

The inclusion of her mother's ideas in her work is also related to the theme of creation and motherhood in the novel. Mary is likely to have acquired some ideas for Frankenstein's character from Humphry Davy's book Elements of Chemical Philosophy in which he had written that "science has…bestowed upon man powers which may be called creative; which have enabled him to change and modify the beings around him…".

Analysis

One interpretation of her novel was alluded to by Shelley herself, in her account of the radical politics of her father, William Godwin:
The giant now awoke. The mind, never torpid, but never rouzed to its full energies, received the spark which lit it into an unextinguishable flame. .Who can now tell the feelings of liberal men on the first outbreak of the French Revolution.^ There was none among the myriads of men that existed who would pity or assist me; and should I feel kindness towards my enemies?
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.In but too short a time afterwards it became tarnished by the vices of Orléans — dimmed by the want of talent of the Girondists — deformed and blood-stained by the Jacobins.^ Suddenly, as I gazed on him, an idea seized me that this little creature was unprejudiced and had lived too short a time to have imbibed a horror of deformity.
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^ I felt also sentiments of joy and affection revive in my bosom; my gloom disappeared, and in a short time I became as cheerful as before I was attacked by the fatal passion.
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[24]
.At one point in Shelley's novel the monster faces Victor on an icy glacier.^ A grin was on the face of the monster; he seemed to jeer, as with his fiendish finger he pointed towards the corpse of my wife.
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The creature explains his feelings of isolation and abandonment. .Victor still does not see he is the one that abandoned this creature, that he was the one responsible to love and devote his time to the creature, just as his parents had done for him as a child.^ Suddenly, as I gazed on him, an idea seized me that this little creature was unprejudiced and had lived too short a time to have imbibed a horror of deformity.
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^ I have devoted my creator, the select specimen of all that is worthy of love and admiration among men, to misery; I have pursued him even to that irremediable ruin.
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^ Both hurt, but I cannot see such a creature scaring off her love.

Why is there such a detachment for Victor? Why does he not see himself as the parent? .In the essay The Nightmare of Romantic Idealism the author states, “When Frankenstein becomes a father […], he conveniently forgets these duties of parents to their offspring […] the one quality he lacks as a creator is the quality he most praises his own parents for: ‘the deep consciousness of what they owed towards the being to which they had given life.’” (Shelley 391) This author also states that “[by Frankenstein’s] refusal to accept an adult role in life […] he retains […] the power to create.^ With this deep consciousness of what they owed towards the being to which they had given life, added to the active spirit of tenderness that animated both, it may be imagined that while during every hour of my infant life I received a lesson of patience, of charity, and of self-control, I was so guided by a silken cord that all seemed but one train of enjoyment to me.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ (EDIT: plus Byron and the Shelleys has been discussing Luigi Galvani's experiments the night before) by this token, "Created life" de novo is perfectly in-genre for a game based on Frankenstein.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ It was after my return from one of these rambles that my father, .
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.But at the same time, he is thoroughly irresponsible […] and lacks the courage to face up to the consequences of his deeds.”(Shelley 391) These passages help explain Victors mind set toward his creation.^ Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room and continued a long time traversing my bed-chamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room and continued a long time traversing my bedchamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep.

^ She thanked him in the most ardent terms for his intended services towards her parent, and at the same time she gently deplored her own fate.
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Unfortunately, Victor’s enchanted childhood didn’t prepare him for the real world. He never had to grow up and take responsibility for his own actions. .Frankenstein explores the relationship between creator and creation, and the universal need for love and acceptance from one's parents and society.^ Furthermore, you seem to believe that in both cases loved ones are lost sight of; Elizabeth for Frankenstein, and in my case, you.

^ Strickfadden created the elaborate electrical gear for the classic Universal Frankenstein pictures.
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

.Victor's rejection of his creation causes the monster to feel as an outcast, stirring anger and resentment in the creature, to which he reacts violently by murdering those whom Victor holds most dear, until the end when Victor dies himself and the monster leaves to kill himself.^ You are forbidden to write—to hold a pen; yet one word from you, dear Victor, is necessary to calm our apprehensions.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ How could you suppose that my first thought would not fly towards those dear, dear friends whom I love and who are so deserving of my love?"
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If I returned, it was to be sacrificed or to see those whom I most loved die under the grasp of a demon whom I had myself created.

Another prevailing theme of Frankenstein is loneliness and the effects that loneliness has on humans. .This theme is explored through the thoughts and experiences of the three main characters: Walton, Frankenstein, and the monster.^ Not many knew of the extreme laudanum addiction, the madness, it is clear in his papers that by the end of August 1823, he actually thought he was both Frankenstein and monster.

^ The attribute "id" allows the reader to search only the text narrated by "Walton," "Frankenstein," or "Monster."

The letters at the beginning of the story are full of Walton's feelings of loneliness as his great adventure begins to lose its luster and appeal. .Victor experiences fear and anxiety throughout the book.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

In the beginning of the story, Victor’s work separated him from his family. He spent many years in isolation. .When his family and friends began to die later in the story these unhealthy feelings intensify.^ It was with these feelings that I began the creation of a human being.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He said “This state of mind preyed upon my health, which had entirely recovered from the first shock it had sustained.^ This state of mind preyed upon my health, which had perhaps never entirely recovered from the first shock it had sustained.

^ This state of mind preyed upon my health, which had perhaps never .
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^ In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.

.I shunned the face of man; all sound of joy or complacency was torture to me; solitude was my only consolation – deep, dark, death-like solitude.” Frankenstein demonstrated these same emotions when he said “Thus situated, employed in the most detestable occupation, immersed in a solitude where nothing could for an instant call my attention from the actual scene in which I was engaged, my spirits became unequal; I grew restless and nervous.” The monster summarised how drastically his loneliness changed him when he said “I cannot believe that I am he whose thoughts were once filled with sublime and transcendent visions of the beauty and the majesty of goodness.^ I could not help believing that I had been too hasty in my .
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^ When I run over the frightful catalogue of my sins, I cannot believe that I am the same creature whose thoughts were once filled with sublime and transcendent visions of the beauty and the majesty of goodness.

^ These thoughts supported my spirits, while I pursued my undertaking .
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.But it is even so; the fallen angel becomes a malignant devil.^ But it is even so; the fallen angel becomes a malignant devil.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ But it is even so; the fallen angel becomes a malignant .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

.Yet even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation; I am quite alone.” Shelley was obviously exploring this theme, as loneliness is a core motivation for her core characters.^ Yet even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation; I am alone.

^ God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance.

^ She also might turn with disgust from him to the superior beauty of man; she might quit him, and he be again alone, exasperated by the fresh provocation of being deserted by one of his own species.

In Nightmare: Birth of Horror Christopher Frayling discusses the theme against vivisection expressed in the novel, since Shelley was a vegetarian. .In Chapter 3 Victor writes that he "tortured the living animal to animate the lifeless clay."^ Who shall conceive the horrors of my secret toil as I dabbled among the unhallowed damps of the grave or tortured the living animal to animate the lifeless clay?
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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.And the Creature says: "My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and kid to glut my appetite."^ I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; .
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^ My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ But so blind is the experience of man that what I conceived to be the best assistants to my plan may have entirely destroyed it.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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.Representing a minority opinion, Arthur Belefant in his book, Frankenstein, the Man and the Monster (1999, ISBN 0-9629555-8-2) contends that Mary Shelley's intent was for the reader to understand that the Creature never existed, and Victor Frankenstein committed the three murders.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ Morrison even opts to eschew the usual pedantic author's conceit of stressing for the reader that "Frankenstein" is the name of the CREATOR of the monster and not the monster itself.
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

In this interpretation, the story is a study of the moral degradation of Victor, and the science fiction aspects of the story are Victor's imagination.
.Another minority opinion is the recent claim by the literary critic John Lauritsen, in his 2007 book, "The Man Who Wrote Frankenstein",[25] that Mary's husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley, was the author.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

.Lauritsen's hypothesis is not given credence by major Mary Shelley scholars[citation needed], but the book was enthusiastically praised by the critic Camille Paglia[26] and criticised by Germaine Greer.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

[27]
Charles E. Robinson, Professor of English at University of Delaware, half supports this debatable authorship in his 2008 edition of Frankenstein. Robinson revisted the manuscripts of Frankenstein and recognised Percy Shelley's assistance throughout those manuscripts.

Reception

.Initial critical reception of the book was mostly unfavorable, compounded by confused speculation as to the identity of the author.^ My critics seem to have missed the point and be completely confused as to why Eichmann wasn't a complete monster in my book.

.Sir Walter Scott wrote that "upon the whole, the work impresses us with a high idea of the author's original genius and happy power of expression", but most reviewers thought it "a tissue of horrible and disgusting absurdity" (Quarterly Review).^ As Yeungling has pointed out, most of the anxieties stemming from this sort of 'power' ambition, originate largely in the repression of certain moral desires or needs within the individual."

^ I thought that as I could not sympathize with him, I had no right to withhold from him the small portion of happiness which was yet in my power to bestow.

^ It was a place fitted for such a work, being hardly more than a rock whose high sides were continually beaten upon by the waves.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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.Despite the reviews, Frankenstein achieved an almost immediate popular success.^ And....one final note of enjoyment, the teenaged girl who first encounters Frankenstein almost immediately tries to join him in his mission as "Girl Frankenstein."
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It became widely known especially through melodramatic theatrical adaptations — Mary Shelley saw a production of Presumption; or The Fate of Frankenstein, a play by Richard Brinsley Peake, in 1823. A French translation appeared as early as 1821 (Frankenstein: ou le Prométhée Moderne, translated by Jules Saladin).^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

^ About the print version Frankenstein Mary Shelley Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley London 1831 Note: Specific origin of the text is unclear, although it is clearly the 1831 version.

.Frankenstein has been both well-received and disregarded since its anonymous publication in 1818. Critical reviews of that time demonstrate these two views.^ Two years had now nearly elapsed since the night on which he first received life; and was this his first crime?
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

The Belle Assemblee described the novel as "very bold fiction" (139). The Quarterly Review stated "that the author has the power of both conception and language" (185). .Sir Walter Scott, writing in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine congratulated "the author's original genius and happy power of expression" (620), although he is less convinced about the way in which the monster gains knowledge about the world and language.^ Safie was always gay and happy; she and I improved rapidly in the knowledge of language, so that in two months I began to comprehend most of the words uttered by my protectors.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ JNewman 09-10-2006, 02:26 AM Originally Posted by Killfalcon I'm half convinced that's intentional: the powers aren't central to the game.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

[28] The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany hoped to see "more productions from this author" (253).
.In two other reviews where the author is known as the daughter of William Godwin, the criticism of the novel is an attack on the feminine nature of Mary Shelley.^ I looked into the writer and the others that were involved with creating this twisted horror story, and it was then that I came upon a letter written to Mary Shelley from her "husband to be" Percy.

^ Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
.
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

.The British Critic attacks the novel's flaws as the fault of the author: "The writer of it is, we understand, a female; this is an aggravation of that which is the prevailing fault of the novel; but if our authoress can forget the gentleness of her sex, it is no reason why we should; and we shall therefore dismiss the novel without further comment" (438).^ I shall kill no albatross; therefore do not .
  • frankenstein.html - flickcharm-python - Project Hosting on Google Code 12 September 2009 10:51 UTC code.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His fault was his own, so many understand this why won't you?

^ What I ask of you is reasonable and moderate; I demand a creature of another sex, but as hideous as myself; the gratification is small, but it is all that I can receive, and it shall content me.

The Literary Panorama and National Register attacks the novel as a "feeble imitation of Mr. Godwin's novels" produced by the "daughter of a celebrated living novelist" (414).
Despite these initial dismissals, critical reception has been largely positive since the mid-20th century.[29] .Major critics such as M. A. Goldberg and Harold Bloom have praised the "aesthetic and moral" relevance of the novel[30] and in more recent years the novel has become a popular subject for psychoanalytic and feminist criticism.^ I picked a novel published in recent years, a cheap, worn out horror story that I believe was Whittington's.

The novel today is generally considered to be a landmark work of Romantic and Gothic literature, as well as Science Fiction.[31]

Frankenstein in popular culture

Boris Karloff as the classic Creature in Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Hollywood's interpretation of Frankenstein's monster, in the make-up designed by Jack Pierce
Shelley's Frankenstein has been called the first novel of the now-popular mad scientist genre.[32] .However, popular culture has changed the naive, well-meaning Victor Frankenstein into more and more of a corrupt character.^ I mean, I suppose the pretty factors into it, but it's not like Frankenstein's monster is going to make a Muse by just stitching up a body as pretty as tree.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Like Victor Frankenstein, I found myself on the verge of a great discovery, capable of changing the world and advancing science by the devices of my mental and intellectual capacity.

.It has also changed the creature into a more sensational, dehumanised being than was originally portrayed.^ More miserable than man ever was before, why did I not sink into forgetfulness and rest?
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ My father made no reproach in his letters and only took notice of my silence by inquiring into my occupations more particularly than before.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ It was a place fitted for such a work, being hardly more than a rock whose high sides were continually beaten upon by the waves.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In the original story, the worst thing that Victor does is to neglect the creature out of fear.^ AM Cool - then I think WW should not have used terms such as 'Golem' for 4 out of 5 of its splats, each of which which are suggestive of very, very different origins and are quite distinct from the Frankenstein story.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ That being said, origin stories are a bit more central that the water thing is to Vampires, so it's harder to emotionally accept the logical answer.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Cool - then I think WW should not have used terms such as 'Golem' for 4 out of 5 of its splats, each of which which are suggestive of very, very different origins and are quite distinct from the Frankenstein story.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

He does not intend to create a horror. .The creature, even, begins as an innocent, loving being.^ He must have been a noble creature in his better days, being even now in wreck so attractive and amiable.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ If such lovely creatures were miserable, it was less strange that I, an imperfect and solitary being, should be wretched.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ They were my brethren, my fellow beings, and I felt attracted even to the most repulsive among them, as to creatures of an angelic nature and celestial mechanism.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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Not until the world inflicts violence on him does he develop his hatred. Scientific knowledge is highlighted at the end by Victor as potentially evil and dangerously alluring.[33]
.Soon after the book was published, however, stage directors began to see the difficulty of bringing the story into a more visual form.^ Themes of stories - or indeed of sessions - have much more room for variance, as the sample games in the books will hopefully illustrate.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ But it's another step removed from the purest form of the story: a creature every part of which is human, yet forced to confront the fact that Humanity is more than the sum of its parts.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

In performances beginning in 1823, playwrights began to recognize that to visualise the play, the internal reasonings of the scientist and the creature would have to be cut. The creature became the star of the show, with his more visual and sensational violence. Victor was portrayed as a fool for delving into nature's mysteries. .Despite the changes, though, the play was much closer to the original than later films would be.^ It's really quite beautiful, I would suggest getting video of it, but it'd probably lose much of the impact on film.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

[34] Comic versions also abounded, and a musical burlesque version was produced in London in 1887 called Frankenstein, or The Vampire's Victim.[35]
Silent films continued the struggle to bring the story alive. .Early versions such as the Edison Company's one-reel Frankenstein (1910) and the feature film Life Without Soul (1915) managed to stick somewhat close to the plot.^ Who thought one evening in society would have such a profound effect on my life forever?

^ They are dead, and but one feeling in such a solitude can persuade me to preserve my life.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ One wonders why they didnt call the film Mary Shellys Frankenstein Island .
  • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

In 1931, however, James Whale directed a film that drastically altered the story. Working at Universal Pictures, Whale's film introduced to the plot several elements now familiar to a modern audience: the image of "Dr." Frankenstein, whereas earlier he was merely a naive, young student; the introduction of an Igor-like character (called Fritz in this film), who makes the mistake of bringing his master a criminal's brain while gathering body parts; and a sensational creation scene focusing on electric power rather than chemical processes. .(In Shelley's original text, Frankenstein, as the narrator, intentionally omits describing the process by which he brings the creature to life, for fear that someone else may try to repeat the experiment.^ (EDIT: plus Byron and the Shelleys has been discussing Luigi Galvani's experiments the night before) by this token, "Created life" de novo is perfectly in-genre for a game based on Frankenstein.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
  • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

^ This is a ballsy "in your face" reinterpretation of the original Frankenstein creature.
  • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

) In this film, the scientist is an arrogant, intelligent, grown man, rather than an unknowing near-youngster. Another scientist volunteers to destroy the creature for him, the film never forcing him to take responsibility for his acts. Whale's sequel Bride of Frankenstein (1935), and later sequels Son of Frankenstein (1939), and Ghost of Frankenstein (1942) all continued the general theme of sensationalism, horror, and exaggeration, with Dr. Frankenstein and other similar characters growing more and more sinister.[36]

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ This illustration is reprinted in the frontpiece to the 2008 edition of Frankenstein
  2. ^ "Preface", 1831 edition of Frankenstein
  3. ^ Sunstein, 118.
  4. ^ Holmes, 328; see also Mary Shelley’s introduction to the 1831 edition of Frankenstein.
  5. ^ Quoted in Spark, 157, from Mary Shelley's introduction to the 1831 edition of Frankenstein.
  6. ^ Bennett, An Introduction, 30–31; Sunstein, 124.
  7. ^ Sunstein, 117.
  8. ^ OX.ac.uk
  9. ^ Amazon.co.uk
  10. ^ Frankenstein:Celluloid Monster at the National Library of Medicine website of the (U.S.) National Institutes of Health
  11. ^ "Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature / Exhibit Text" (pdf). National Library of Medicine and ALA Public Programs Office. Archived from the original on 2005-03-06. http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.ala.org/ala/ppo/currentprograms/frankenstein/exhibittext.pdf. Retrieved 2007-12-31.  from the traveling exhibition Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature
  12. ^ Author's Digest: The World's Great Stories in Brief, by Rossiter Johnson, 1908
  13. ^ The Reef, page 96.
  14. ^ This essay was included in the 2005 publication of Fantasmagoriana; the first full English translation of the book of 'ghost stories' that inspired the literary competition resulting in Mary's writing of Frankenstein.
  15. ^ "Burg Frankenstein". burg-frankenstein.de. http://www.burg-frankenstein.de. Retrieved 2007-01-02. 
  16. ^ (Leonard Wolf, p.20)
  17. ^ RenegadeNation.de Frankenstein Castle, Shelley and the Construction of a Myth
  18. ^ Sandy, Mark (2002-09-20). "Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire". The Literary Encyclopedia. The Literary Dictionary Company. http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=3010. Retrieved 2007-01-02. 
  19. ^ "Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)". Romantic Natural History. Department of English, Dickinson College. http://www.dickinson.edu/~nicholsa/Romnat/pbshelley.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-02. 
  20. ^ Percy Shelley#Ancestry
  21. ^ "Journal 6 December—Very Unwell. Shelley & Clary walk out, as usual, to heaps of places...A letter from Hookham to say that Harriet has been brought to bed of a son and heir. Shelley writes a number of circular letters on this event, which ought to be ushered in with ringing of bells, etc., for it is the son of his wife." Quoted in Spark, 39.)
  22. ^ (Leonard Wolf, p. 20).
  23. ^ RoyalSoc.ac.uk "Benjamin Franklin in London." The Royal Society. retrieved August 8, 2007
  24. ^ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, "Life of William Godwin," p. 151
  25. ^ Amazon.com
  26. ^ Salon.com
  27. ^ Guardian.co.uk
  28. ^ Crossref-it.info
  29. ^ Enotes.com
  30. ^ KCTCS.edu
  31. ^ UTM.edu Lynn Alexander, Department of English, University of Tennessee at Martin. Retrieved 27 August 2009.
  32. ^ Toumey, Christopher P. "The Moral Character of Mad Scientists: A Cultural Critique of Science." Science, Technology, & Human Values. 17.4 (Autumn, 1992) pg. 8
  33. ^ Toumey, pgs. 423–425
  34. ^ Toumey, pg. 425
  35. ^ Towson.edu
  36. ^ Toumey, pgs. 425–427

Bibliography

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    .Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.
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    ^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

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    ^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

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    New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
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    • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

    Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1990.
  • Freedman, Carl. "Hail Mary: On the Author of Frankenstein and the Origins of Science Fiction". Science Fiction Studies 29.2 (2002): 253–64.
  • Gigante, Denise. "Facing the Ugly: The Case of Frankenstein". ELH 67.2 (2000): 565–87.
  • Gilbert, Sandra and Susan Gubar. The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination. .New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979.
  • Heffernan, James A. W. "Looking at the Monster: Frankenstein and Film". Critical Inquiry 24.1 (1997): 133–58.
  • Hodges, Devon.^ Apparently, Universals copyright on Jack Pierces classic Frankenstein Monster makeup had expired by the time this film was made.
    • Frankenstein Island Review - Jabootu's Bad Movie Dimension 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.jabootu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let's look at the cover first ~ our first look at DC's new "Frankenstein" character.
    • AICN COMICS REVIEWS 7 SOLDIERS FRANKENSTEIN! PUNISHER VS BULLSEYE! WALKING DEAD! AND MORE!!! -- Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news. 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    "Frankenstein and the Feminine Subversion of the Novel". Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature 2.2 (1983): 155–64.
  • Hoeveler, Diane Long. Gothic Feminism: The Professionalization of Gender from Charlotte Smith to the Brontës. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998.
  • Holmes, Richard. Shelley: The Pursuit. 1974. London: Harper Perennial, 2003. ISBN 0007204582.
  • Knoepflmacher, U. C. and George Levine, eds. .The Endurance of "Frankenstein": Essays on Mary Shelley's Novel.^ Mary Shelley includes alchemy in Victor Frankenstein's experiments, overall the book far better reflects the fears of her time.
    • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

    ^ If this rumor were true, then even Mary Shelley’s life, in addition to her work, Frankenstein, would be a testament to this philosophy of creation.

    .Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.
  • Lew, Joseph W. "The Deceptive Other: Mary Shelley's Critique of Orientalism in Frankenstein". Studies in Romanticism 30.2 (1991): 255–83.
  • Lauritsen, John.^ The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
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    • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

    "The Man Who Wrote Frankenstein". Pagan Press, 2007.
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    • Promethean - 'The Splats' [Archive] - RPGnet Forums 22 September 2009 22:022 UTC forum.rpg.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Ivanhoe Game as played by Professor McGann's students with the text of Mary Shelley's ''Frankenstein.''

    New York: Methuen, 1988.
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  • Poovey, Mary. .The Proper Lady and the Woman Writer: Ideology as Style in the Works of Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, and Jane Austen.^ Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley .
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  • Williams, Anne. The Art of Darkness: A Poetics of Gothic. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Frankenstein may refer to either:
.This is a disambiguation page; that is, one that points to other pages that might otherwise have the same name.^ The creator and the created are always two sides of the same coin, one side can not deny the other!

^ Did the one inspire the other, or are they, like new discoveries in science, different examples, of different quality, of the same idea whose time had come?
  • Young Frankenstein | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I also became a poet and for one year lived in a paradise of my own creation; I imagined that I also might obtain a niche in the temple where the names of Homer and Shakespeare are consecrated.
  • The Project Gutenberg E-text of Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Frankenstein 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

If you followed a link here, you might want to go back and fix that link to point to the appropriate specific page.

Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley
Table of Contents
.Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, first published in London in 1818, is a novel infused with some elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement.^ In 1817, the English Gothic writer Mary Shelley synthesized the two when she completed Frankenstein ,or the Modern Prometheus , incorporating elements of Hegel's philosophy and Romantic thought.
  • Frankenstein@Everything2.com 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The book’s subtitle, “The Modern Prometheus,” is an allusion to the dangers of the industrial movement and man playing God.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Despite being considered one of the first fully realized science fiction novels, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein really got the shaft when it came to adaptations.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.It was also a warning against the "over-reaching" of modern man and the Industrial Revolution.^ The book’s subtitle, “The Modern Prometheus,” is an allusion to the dangers of the industrial movement and man playing God.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Shelley apparently wrote it as a warning to scientists and against the Industrial Revolution in general, reminding them that they are not God and of the dangers of over-reaching themselves.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.The story has had an influence across literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories and films.^ Describes footage restored to "Frankenstein" as part of Universal's programme to issue complete versions of its classic horror films on video.
  • Frankenstein and Dracula (motion pictures): A Short Bibliography of Materials in the UC Berkeley Libraries 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.lib.berkeley.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Though I would imagine studying the popular culture side of the story would be just as fascinating as studying the book itself.
  • Frankenstein (Paperback) by Mary Shelley - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 13 January 2010 22:30 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

Many distinguished authors, such as Brian Aldiss, claim that it is the very first science fiction novel.— Excerpted from Frankenstein on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Speaker Icon.svg one or more chapters are available in a spoken word format.
Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay
To mould Me man? Did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me?—
Paradise Lost (x. 743-5)

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

FRANKENSTEIN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Silesia, on the Pausebach, 35 m. S. by W. of Breslau. Pop. (1905) 7890. It is still surrounded by its medieval walls, has two Evangelical and three Roman Catholic churches, among the latter the parish church with a curious overhanging tower, and a monastery. The industries include the manufacture of artificial manures, bricks, beer and straw hats. There are also mills for grinding the magnesite found in the neighbourhood.


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Proper noun

Frankenstein
  1. a novel by Mary Shelley
  2. The creator of Frankenstein's monster in Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.
  3. (mistakenly) Frankenstein's monster itself

Synonyms

Related terms


Simple English

Frankenstein is an 1818 novel by the English writer Mary Shelley. The novel is about a young man who makes a monster by bringing a dead body back to life. The man's name is Victor Frankenstein.

Many people call the monster Frankenstein as well. "Frankenstein the scientist created Frankenstein the monster."

Plot

Frankenstein was a scientist. He tried to make life. He made a person from parts of dead bodies. He made the person live. The person was a monster. The monster scared Frankenstein. Frankenstein ran away. The monster was sad and angry. He saw a family. The monster learned to talk. The family made him leave. The monster killed Frankenstein's brother. The monster blamed Justine. Justine was killed. The monster talked to Frankenstein. He wanted Frankenstein to make a woman. The monster wanted to live with the woman. Frankenstein started to make the woman. He stopped. Frankenstein did not make the woman. The monster was angry. The monster killed Frankenstein's friend, Henry Clerval, and also Frankenstein's wife. Frankenstein chased the monster to the Arctic. Frankenstein met Captain Walton. Frankenstein went onto Captain Walton's ship. Frankenstein and Captain Walton talked. Frankenstein died. The monster saw Frankenstein. The monster wanted to kill himself because he felt lonely. So he did.

Mary Shelley was married to a poet named Percy Shelley. She was 16 when she thought of the story of Frankenstein but she actually wrote the story when she was 18. The book was published when she was 19 but her name was not put on the first edition in London. Her name only appeared on the second edition which was made in London.



Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 16, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Frankenstein, which are similar to those in the above article.








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