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Franklin often refers to Benjamin Franklin, a Founding Father of the United States

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In the United States

  • State of Franklin (1784–1789), an autonomous territory that later became part of the U.S. state of Tennessee

Ships

  • Any of the ships called USS Franklin
  • HMAS Franklin, a steel screw steamer in the Australian Navy also known as Adele and HMAS Adele

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Benjamin Franklin article)

From Wikiquote

He that would live in peace and at ease, Must not speak all he knows, nor judge all he sees.
I think opinions should be judged by their influences and effects; and if a man holds none that tend to make him less virtuous or more vicious, it may be concluded that he holds none that are dangerous, which I hope is the case with me.

Benjamin Franklin (17 January 170617 April 1790) was an American inventor, journalist, printer, diplomat, and statesman.

See also: Poor Richard's Almanack (1733–1758)

Contents

Sourced

Remember that time is money.
Every Body cries, a Union is absolutely necessary, but when they come to the Manner and Form of the Union, their weak Noddles are perfectly distracted.
Idleness and pride tax with a heavier hand than kings and parliaments. If we can get rid of the former, we may easily bear the latter.
Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
We hear of the conversion of water into wine at the marriage in Cana as of a miracle. But this conversion is, through the goodness of God, made every day before our eyes. Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards; there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy.
As to Jesus of Nazareth, my Opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think the System of Morals and his Religion, as he left them to us, the best the world ever saw or is likely to see; but I apprehend it has received various corrupt changes, and I have, with most of the present Dissenters in England, some Doubts as to his divinity; tho' it is a question I do not dogmatize upon...
  • Mankind naturally and generally love to be flatter'd: Whatever sooths our Pride, and tends to exalt our Species above the rest of the Creation, we are pleas'd with and easily believe, when ungrateful Truths shall be with the utmost Indignation rejected. "What! bring ourselves down to an Equality with the Beasts of the Field! with the meanest part of the Creation! 'Tis insufferable!" But, (to use a Piece of common Sense) our Geese are but Geese tho' we may think 'em Swans; and Truth will be Truth tho' it sometimes prove mortifying and distasteful.
  • I believe there is one Supreme most perfect being. ... I believe He is pleased and delights in the happiness of those He has created; and since without virtue man can have no happiness in this world, I firmly believe He delights to see me virtuous.
    • "Articles of Belief and Acts of Religion" (1728)
  • I think opinions should be judged of by their influences and effects, and if a man holds none that tend to make him less virtuous or more vicious, it may be concluded that he holds none that are dangerous; which I hope is the case with me.
    • Letter to his father, 13 April 1738, printed in Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin (Philadelphia, 1834), volume 1, p. 233. Also quoted in Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (2003) by Walter Isaacson
  • Remember that time is money.
    • Advice to a Young Tradesman (1748)
  • Much less is it adviseable for a Person to go thither [to America], who has no other Quality to recommend him but his Birth. In Europe it has indeed its Value; but it is a Commodity that cannot be carried to a worse Market than that of America, where people do not inquire concerning a Stranger, What is he? but, What can he do?
    • Information to Those Who Would Remove to America
  • The Game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement; several very valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are to be acquired and strengthened by it, so as to become habits ready on all occasions; for life is a kind of Chess, in which we have often points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some degree, the effect of prudence, or the want of it. By playing at Chess then, we may learn: 1st, Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers the consequences that may attend an action ... 2nd, Circumspection, which surveys the whole Chess-board, or scene of action: — the relation of the several Pieces, and their situations; ... 3rd, Caution, not to make our moves too hastily...
    • "The Morals of Chess" (article) (1750)
  • Every Body cries, a Union is absolutely necessary, but when they come to the Manner and Form of the Union, their weak Noddles are perfectly distracted.
    • Letter to Peter Collinson (29 December 1754); published in The Writings of Benjamin Franklin (1905), edited by Albert Henry Smyth, Vol. III, p. 242
  • I have read your Manuscript with some Attention. By the Arguments it contains against the Doctrine of a particular Providence, tho’ you allow a general Providence, you strike at the Foundation of all Religion: For without the Belief of a Providence that takes Cognizance of, guards and guides and may favour particular Persons, there is no Motive to Worship a Deity, to fear its Displeasure, or to pray for its Protection. I will not enter into any Discussion of your Principles, tho’ you seem to desire it; At present I shall only give you my Opinion that tho’ your Reasonings are subtle, and may prevail with some Readers, you will not succeed so as to change the general Sentiments of Mankind on that Subject, and the Consequence of printing this Piece will be a great deal of Odium drawn upon your self, Mischief to you and no Benefit to others. He that spits against the Wind, spits in his own Face. But were you to succeed, do you imagine any Good would be done by it? You yourself may find it easy to live a virtuous Life without the Assistance afforded by Religion; you having a clear Perception of the Advantages of Virtue and the Disadvantages of Vice, and possessing a Strength of Resolution sufficient to enable you to resist common Temptations. But think how great a Proportion of Mankind consists of weak and ignorant Men and Women, and of inexperienc’d and inconsiderate Youth of both Sexes, who have need of the Motives of Religion to restrain them from Vice, to support their Virtue, and retain them in the Practice of it till it becomes habitual, which is the great Point for its Security; And perhaps you are indebted to her originally that is to your Religious Education, for the Habits of Virtue upon which you now justly value yourself. You might easily display your excellent Talents of reasoning on a less hazardous Subject, and thereby obtain Rank with our most distinguish’d Authors. For among us, it is not necessary, as among the Hottentots that a Youth to be receiv’d into the Company of Men, should prove his Manhood by beating his Mother. I would advise you therefore not to attempt unchaining the Tyger, but to burn this Piece before it is seen by any other Person, whereby you will save yourself a great deal of Mortification from the Enemies it may raise against you, and perhaps a good deal of Regret and Repentance. If Men are so wicked as we now see them with Religion what would they be if without it?
  • The Way to see by Faith, is to shut the Eye of Reason:
    The Morning Daylight appears plainer when you put out your Candle.
  • That Being, who gave me existence, and through almost threescore years has been continually showering his favors upon me, whose very chastisements have been blessings to me ; can I doubt that he loves me? And, if he loves me, can I doubt that he will go on to take care of me, not only here but hereafter? This to some may seem presumption ; to me it appears the best grounded hope ; hope of the future built on experience of the past.
    • Letter to George Whitefield (19 June 1764), published in The Works of Benjamin Franklin (1856).
  • Idleness and pride tax with a heavier hand than kings and parliaments. If we can get rid of the former, we may easily bear the latter.
    • Letter on the Stamp Act (1 July 1765), as quoted in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it.
    • On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor (29 November 1766)
  • They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    • This was written by Franklin, with quotation marks but almost certainly his original thought, sometime shortly before February 17, 1775 as part of his notes for a proposition at the Pennsylvania Assembly, as published in Memoirs of the life and writings of Benjamin Franklin (1818). A variant of this was published as:
      • Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
        • This was used as a motto on the title page of An Historical Review of the Constitution and Government of Pennsylvania. (1759); the book was published by Franklin; its author was Richard Jackson, but Franklin did claim responsibility for some small excerpts that were used in it.
    • An earlier variant by Franklin in Poor Richard's Almanack (1738): "Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power."
    • The saying has also appeared in many paraphrased forms:
      • They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
        They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
        Those Who Sacrifice Liberty For Security Deserve Neither.
        He who would trade liberty for some temporary security, deserves neither liberty nor security.
        He who sacrifices freedom for security deserves neither.
        People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both.
        If we restrict liberty to attain security we will lose them both.
        Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.
        He who gives up freedom for safety deserves neither.
        Those who would trade in their freedom for their protection deserve neither.
        Those who give up their liberty for more security neither deserve liberty nor security.
  • We hear of the conversion of water into wine at the marriage in Cana as of a miracle. But this conversion is, through the goodness of God, made every day before our eyes. Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards; there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy. The miracle in question was only performed to hasten the operation, under circumstances of present necessity, which required it.
  • All Wars are Follies, very expensive, and very mischievous ones. When will Mankind be convinced of this, and agree to settle their Differences by Arbitration? Were they to do it, even by the Cast of a Dye, it would be better than by Fighting and destroying each other.
    • Letter to Mary Hewson[1], Jan. 27. 1783
  • There never was a good war or a bad peace.
    • Letter to Josiah Quincy (11 September 1783)
  • I've lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing Proofs I see of this Truth — That God governs in the Affairs of Men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his Notice, is it probable that an Empire can rise without his Aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that except the Lord build the House they labor in vain who build it. I firmly believe this, — and I also believe that without his concurring Aid, we shall succeed in this political Building no better than the Builders of Babel: We shall be divided by our little partial local interests; our Projects will be confounded, and we ourselves shall become a Reproach and Bye word down to future Ages.
  • In these sentiments, Sir, I agree to this Constitution, with all its faults, — if they are such; because I think a general Government necessary for us, and there is no form of government but what may be a blessing to the people, if well administered; and I believe, farther, that this is likely to be well administered for a course of years, and can only end in despotism, as other forms have done before it, when the people shall become so corrupted as to need despotic government, being incapable of any other.
    • Speech to the Constitutional Convention (28 June 1787)
  • Whilst the last members were signing it Doctor Franklin looking towards the President's Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that Painters had found it difficult to distinguish in their art a rising from a setting sun. “I have,” said he, “often and often in the course of the Session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting: But now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting Sun.”
    • At the signing of the United States Constitution, Journal of the Constitutional Convention (17 September 1787)
  • Remember me affectionately to good Dr. Price and to the honest heretic Dr. Priestly. I do not call him honest by way of distinction; for I think all the heretics I have known have been virtuous men. They have the virtue of fortitude or they would not venture to own their heresy; and they cannot afford to be deficient in any of the other virtues, as that would give advantage to their many enemies; and they have not like orthodox sinners, such a number of friends to excuse or justify them. Do not, however mistake me. It is not to my good friend's heresy that I impute his honesty. On the contrary, 'tis his honesty that has brought upon him the character of heretic.
  • Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.
    • Letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy (13 November 1789)
  • The art of concluding from experience and observation consists in evaluating probabilities, in estimating if they are high or numerous enough to constitute proof. This type of calculation is more complicated and more difficult than one might think. It demands a great sagacity generally above the power of common people. The success of charlatans, sorcerors, and alchemists — and all those who abuse public credulity — is founded on errors in this type of calculation.
    • Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier, Rapport des commissaires chargés par le roi de l'examen du magnétisme animal (1784), as translated in "The Chain of Reason versus the Chain of Thumbs", Bully for Brontosaurus (1991) by Stephen Jay Gould, p. 195
  • As to Jesus of Nazareth, my Opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think the System of Morals and his Religion, as he left them to us, the best the world ever saw or is likely to see; but I apprehend it has received various corrupt changes, and I have, with most of the present Dissenters in England, some Doubts as to his divinity; tho' it is a question I do not dogmatize upon, having never studied it, and I think it needless to busy myself with it now, when I expect soon an Opportunity of knowing the Truth with less Trouble.
    • As quoted in Benjamin Franklin: An Exploration of a Life of Science and Service (1938) by Carl Van Doren, p. 777

The Autobiography (1817)

Various incomplete editions of this work were published from 1791 onwards; Franklin is known to have worked on it intermittently from 1771 to 1789.
Human felicity is produced not so much by great pieces of good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that occur every day.
So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable creature, since it enables one to find or make a reason for everything one has a mind to do.
  • I scarce ever heard or saw the introductory words, "Without vanity I may say," &c., but some vain thing immediately followed. Most people dislike vanity in others, whatever share they have of it themselves; but I give it fair quarter wherever I meet with it, being persuaded that it is often productive of good to the possessor, and to others that are within his sphere of action; and therefore, in many cases, it would not be altogether absurd if a man were to thank God for his vanity among the other comforts of life.
  • From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came into my hands was ever laid out in books.
  • This library afforded me the means of improvement by constant study, for which I set apart an hour or two each day, and thus repaired in some degree the loss of the learned education my father once intended for me. Reading was the only amusement I allowed myself. I spent no time in taverns, games, or frolics of any kind; and my industry in my business continued as indefatigable as it was necessary.
  • Human felicity is produced not so much by great pieces of good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that occur every day.
  • My parents had early given me religious impressions, and brought me through my childhood piously in the Dissenting way. But I was scarce fifteen, when, after doubting by turns of several points, as I found them disputed in the different books I read, I began to doubt of Revelation itself. Some books against Deism fell into my hands; they were said to be the substance of sermons preached at Boyle's Lectures. It happened that they wrought an effect on me quite contrary to what was intended by them; for the arguments of the Deists, which were quoted to be refuted, appeared to me much stronger than the refutations; in short, I soon became a thorough Deist.
  • I believe I have omitted mentioning that, in my first voyage from Boston, being becalm'd off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and on this occasion consider'd, with my master Tryon, the taking every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them had, or ever could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter. All this seemed very reasonable. But I had formerly been a great lover of fish, and, when this came hot out of the frying-pan, it smelt admirably well. I balanced some time between principle and inclination, till I recollected that, when the fish were opened, I saw smaller fish taken out of their stomachs; then thought I, "If you eat one another, I don't see why we mayn't eat you." So I din'd upon cod very heartily, and continued to eat with other people, returning only now and then occasionally to a vegetable diet. So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable creature, since it enables one to find or make a reason for everything one has a mind to do.
  • As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours; and this we should do freely and generously.
  • These names of virtues, with their precepts, were:
    • 1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation.
    • 2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation.
    • 3. ORDER. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time.
    • 4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.
    • 5. FRUGALITY. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing.
    • 6. INDUSTRY. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions.
    • 7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
    • 8. JUSTICE. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.
    • 9. MODERATION. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.
    • 10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation.
    • 11. TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable.
    • 12. CHASTITY. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation.
    • 13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.
      • The last of Franklin's chart of 13 virtues: "My list of virtues contain'd at first but twelve; but a Quaker friend having kindly informed me that I was generally thought proud; [...] I determined endeavouring to cure myself, if I could, of this vice or folly among the rest, and I added Humility to my list."
  • In 1736 I lost one of my sons, a fine boy of four years old, by the small-pox, taken in the common way. I long regretted bitterly and still regret that I had not given it to him by inoculation. This I mention for the sake of parents who omit that operation on the supposition that they should never forgive themselves if a child died under it, by example showing that the regret may be the same either way and that, therefore, the safer should be chosen.
  • "Gov'r. Thomas was so pleas'd with the construction of this stove...that he offered to give me a patent for the sole vending of them for a term of years; but I declin'd it from a principle which has ever weighed with me on such occasions, viz., That, as we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any inventions of ours; and this we should do freely and generously."

Attributed

We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.
  • We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.
    • Statement at the signing of the Declaration of Independence (1776-07-04), quoted as an anecdote in The Works of Benjamin Franklin by Jared Sparks (1840). However, this had earlier been attributed to Richard Penn in Memoirs of a Life, Chiefly Passed in Pennsylvania, Within the Last Sixty Years (1811, p. 116). In the same year, it appears in the English play Life by Mrs Inchbald [1], and a similar pun on "hang alone ... hang together" appears in Dryden's 1717 The Spanish Fryar Google Books.

Misattributed

  • Treason is a charge invented by winners as an excuse for hanging the losers.
  • [Freedom is] not a gift bestowed upon us by other men, but a right that belongs to us by the laws of God and nature.
    • This is actually from an essay "On Government No. I" that appeared in Franklin's paper, The Pennsylvania Gazette, on 1 April 1736. The author was John Webbe. He wrote about the privileges enjoyed under British rule,
Thank God! we are in the full enjoyment of all these privileges. But can we be taught to prize them too much? or how can we prize them equal to their value, if we do not know their intrinsic worth, and that they are not a gift bestowed upon us by other men, but a right that belongs to us by the laws of God and nature?
  • Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
    • Widely attributed to Franklin on the internet, sometimes without the second sentence. It is not found in any of his known writings, and the word "lunch" is not known to have appeared anywhere in english literature until the 1820s, decades after his death. The phrasing itself has a very modern tone and the second sentence especially might not even be as old as the internet. Some of these observations are made in response to a query at Google Answers.
      A far rarer but somewhat more credible variation also occurs: "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner." Web searches on these lines uncovers the earliest definite citations for such a statement credit libertarian author James Bovard with a similar one in the Sacramento Bee (1994):
"Democracy must be something more than two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner."
This statement also definitely occurs in the "Conclusion" (p. 333) of his book Lost Rights: The Destruction of American Liberty (1994) ISBN 0312123337
  • God made beer because he loves us and wants us to be happy.
    • The quote, and its many variants, has been widely attributed to Franklin; however, there has never been an authoritative source for the quote, and research indicates that it is very likely a misquotation of Franklin's words regarding wine: "Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards; there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy." (see sourced section above for a more extensive quotation of this passage from a letter to André Morellet), written in 1779.
  • The colonies would gladly have borne the little tax on tea and other matters had it not been that England took away from the colonies their money, which created unemployment and dissatisfaction. The inability of colonists to get power to issue their own money permanently out of the hands of George the III and the international bankers was the PRIME reason for the Revolutionary War.
    • Widely quoted statement on the reasons for the American War of Independence sometimes cited as being from Franklin's autobiography, but this statement was never in any edition.
    • Variant: The colonies would gladly have borne the little tax on tea and other matters had it not been that England and the Rothschild's Bank took away from the colonies their money which created unemployment, dissatisfaction and debt.
    • Variants from various small publications from the 1940s:
      • The refusal of King George to allow the colonies to operate an honest money system, which freed the ordinary man from clutches of the money manipulators was probably the prime cause of the revolution.
      • The refusal of King George to allow the Colonies to operate on an honest Colonial system, which freed the ordinary man from the clutches of the money manipulators, was probably the prime cause of the revolution.
      • The refusal of King George to allow the colonies to operate on an honest, colonial money system, which freed the ordinary man from the clutches of the money manipulators, was probably the prime cause of the revolution.
    • Some of the statement might be derived from those made during his examination by the British Parliament in February 1766, published in "The Examination of Benjamin Franklin" in The Parliamentary History of England from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803‎ (1813); when questioned why Parliament had lost respect among the people of the Colonies, he answered: "To a concurrence of causes: the restraints lately laid on their trade, by which the bringing of foreign gold and silver into the Colonies was prevented; the prohibition of making paper money among themselves, and then demanding a new and heavy tax by stamps; taking away, at the same time, trials by juries, and refusing to receive and hear their humble petitions."
  • ...in the Colonies we issue our own money. It is called Colonial Scrip. We issue it in proper proportion to the demands of trade and industry to make the products pass easily from the producers to the consumers. In this manner, creating for ourselves our own paper money, we control its purchasing power, and we have no interest to pay no one.
    • Quoted in Money and Men by Robert McCann Rice (1941) but no prior source is extant.
  • There is a great danger for the United States of America. This great danger is the Jew.
    • Part of a longer quotation attributed to Franklin during the Constitutional Convention, supposedly recorded by Charles Pinckney in a journal that no longer exists. The quotation, first appearing in print in the 1930s, uses English idioms that were unknown in Franklin's time.
  • The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.
    • Misattributed to various people, including Albert Einstein and Mark Twain. The earliest known occurrence, and probable origin is Rita Mae Brown, Sudden Death (Bantam Books, New York, 1983), p. 68.
  • Each man has two countries, I think: His own, and France.
    • Henri de Bornier, La Fille de Roland, act III, scene ii, p. 65 (1875) "Tout homme a deux pays, le sien et puis la France!"
    • Also misattributed to Thomas Jefferson in 1880 [2]
  • Your argument is sound, nothing but sound.
    • Anonymous quip quoted in an essay in Logic, an Introduction (1950) by Lionel Ruby. A Benjamin Franklin quote immediately follows, so this statement was misattributed to Franklin.
  • To find out a girl's faults, praise her to her girl friends.
    • This has been widely attributed to Franklin since the 1940s, but is not found in any of his works. The language is not Franklin's, nor that of his time. It may be a paraphrase of something he wrote in 1732 under the name Alice Addertongue:
      • If I have never heard Ill of some Person, I always impute it to defective Intelligence; for there are none without their Faults, no, not one. If she be a Woman, I take the first Opportunity to let all her Acquaintance know I have heard that one of the handsomest or best Men in Town has said something in Praise either of her Beauty, her Wit, her Virtue, or her good Management. If you know any thing of Humane Nature, you perceive that this naturally introduces a Conversation turning upon all her Failings, past, present, and to come.
  • Our critics are our friends, they show us our faults.
    • Quoted by Bill Clinton in 1998 but no source can be found.
  • We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing.

Quotes about Franklin

He seized the lightning from Heaven and the scepter from the Tyrants. ~ Turgot
  • Eripuit Coelo fulmen, mox Sceptra Tyrannis.
    • He seized the lightning from Heaven and the scepter from the Tyrants.
    • Variants:
    • Eripuit fulmen coelo, mox sceptra tyrannis.
    • Eripuit coelo fulmen sceptrumque tyrannis.
    • He snatched lightning from the sky and scepters from tyrants.
  • Francklin repéta plus d’une fois à ses éleves de Paris, que celui qui transporterait dans l’état politique les principes du christianismê primitif, changerait la face de la société. Egalité absolue des conditions, communauté des biens, République de pauvres et de frères, association sans Gouvernement, enthousiasme pour les dogmes et soumission à des chefs électifs, choisis entre des Pairs; voilà sans doute à quoi le presbytérien de Philadelphie réduisait la religion chrétienne…
    • Franklin often told his disciples in Paris, that whoever would introduce the principles of primitive Christianity, into the political state, would change the whole order of society. An absolute equality of condition; a community of goods; a Republic of the poor and of brethren; associations without a Government; enthusiasm for dogmas, and submission to chiefs to be elected from their equals,—this is the state to which the Presbyterian of Philadelphia reduced the Christian Religion.
      • Jacques François Mallet du Pan in Considérations sur la nature de la Révolution de France (1793 edition at Google Books), p. 22. Often given in the form "He who shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world" as a quotation from Benjamin Franklin.
  • The prime exponent of paper money in those years was Benjamin Franklin. He thought it a good and useful thing, and his advocacy had an intensely practical touch. He printed money for the colonial governments on his own printing press.

References

  1. Life, Mrs Inchbald, 1811, Google Books

External links

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

There is more than one place called Franklin:

United States of America

  • Franklin (Alabama) - a town in Macon County, Alabama.
  • Franklin (Arkansas) - a town in Izard County, Arkansas.
  • Franklin (Connecticut) - a town in New London County, Connecticut.
  • Franklin (Georgia) - a city in Heard County, Georgia.
  • Franklin (Idaho) - a city in Franklin County, Idaho.
  • Franklin (Illinois) - a village in Morgan County, Illinois.
  • Franklin (Indiana) - a city in Johnson County, Indiana.
  • Franklin (Iowa) - a city in Lee County, Iowa.
  • Franklin (Kentucky) - a city in Simpson County, Kentucky.
  • Franklin (Louisiana) - the parish seat of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana.
  • Franklin (Maine) - a town in Hancock County, Maine.
  • Franklin (Massachusetts) - a city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts.
  • Franklin (Michigan, village in Oakland County, Michigan.
  • Franklin (Minnesota) - a city in Renville County, Minnesota.
  • Franklin (Missouri) - a city in Howard County, Missouri.
  • Franklin (Nebraska) - a city in Franklin County, Nebraska.
  • Franklin (New Hampshire) - a city in Merrimack County, New Hampshire.
  • Franklin (New Jersey) - a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey.
  • Franklin (Delaware County) - a town in Delaware County, New York (state).
  • Franklin (Franklin County) - a town located in southeast Franklin County, New York (state).
  • Franklin (North Carolina) - a town located in Franklin Township, North Carolina.
  • Franklin (Ohio) - a city in Warren County, Ohio.
  • Franklin, Pennsylvania (two locations):
  • Franklin (Tennessee) - a city in Williamson County, Tennessee.
  • Franklin (Texas) - a city in Robertson County, Texas.
  • Franklin (Vermont) - a town in Franklin County, Vermont.
  • Franklin (Virginia) - a city in Virginia.
  • Franklin (West Virginia) - a town in Pendleton County, West Virginia.
  • Franklin, Wisconsin (six locations):
    • Franklin (Jackson County) - a town in Jackson County, Wisconsin.
    • Franklin (Kewaunee County) - a town in Kewaunee County, Wisconsin.
    • Franklin (Manitowoc County) - a town in Manitowoc County, Wisconsin.
    • Franklin (Milwaukee County) - a city in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.
    • Franklin (Sauk County) - a town in Sauk County, Wisconsin.
    • Franklin (Vernon County) - a town in Vernon County, Wisconsin

See also: Franklin County.

This article is a disambiguation page. If you arrived here by following a link from another page you can help by correcting it, so that it points to the appropriate disambiguated page.

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
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From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also franklin

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Franklin

Plural
-

Franklin

  1. A surname derived from Middle English Franklin.
  2. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), American author, scientist, inventor, and diplomat, and one of the Founding Fathers.
  3. A male given name transferred from the surname, partly in honor of Benjamin Franklin.

Derived terms

  • Franklin stove

See also

Noun

Singular
Franklin

Plural
Franklins

Franklin (plural Franklins)

  1. (US, informal) A one-hundred-dollar bill, which carries the portrait of Benjamin Franklin.

Synonyms


Middle English

Noun

Franklin

  1. A Middle English name for an English freeman that owns land but is not of noble birth.

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to James Franklin article)

From Wikispecies

(c.1783–1834)








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