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Franz Kafka

The novelist poses for a portrait in 1906
Born 3 July 1883(1883-07-03)
Prague, Austria–Hungary
Died 3 June 1924 (aged 40)
Kierling near Vienna, Austria
Occupation Insurance officer, factory manager, novelist, short story writer
Language German, Czech
Nationality Bohemian (Austria–Hungary)
Genres Fiction, short story
Literary movement Modernism, existentialism
Notable work(s) The Trial, The Castle, The Metamorphosis
Signature
.Franz Kafka (German pronunciation: [ˈfʁants ˈkafka]; 3 July 1883 – 3 June 1924) is one of the most important and influential fiction writers of the early 20th century; a novelist and writer of short stories whose works, only after his death, came to be regarded as one of the major achievements of 20th century literature.^ Biography Biography of Franz Kafka (1883-1924).
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I find this story one of Kafka’s best works.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Franz sells a short story—and another, and another.
  • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

.He was born to middle-class German-speaking Jewish parents in Prague, Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic, in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire.^ Kafka was a Czech-born, German-speaking Jewish boy… a reflection of Europe in 1883.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Biography Franz Kafka was born in Prague, in what is now part of the Czech Republic, on 3 July 1883.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At this time the vast majority of people in Prague spoke Czech, but owing to the power of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the language of the elites was German.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.The house in which he was born, on the Old Town Square next to Prague's Church of St Nicholas, today contains a permanent exhibition devoted to the author.^ In no way is this church to be confused with the St. Nicholas of Old Town Square.
  • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Franz Kafka lived in this building, called the House at the Minute, near Old Town Square, from 1889 to 1896.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Prague, the Altstadter Ring (Old Town Square), around the time that Kafka was working on The Castle 1922 .
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[1]
.Kafka's work—the novels The Trial (1925), The Castle (1926) and Amerika (1927), as well as short stories including The Metamorphosis (1912) and In the Penal Colony (1914)—is now collectively considered to be among the most original bodies of work in modern Western literature.^ Amerika , stopped work on the novel in 1914.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Known for its “story-within,” The Trial was one of Kafka’s favorite works.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Here Kafka began work on The Trial .
  • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

.Much of his work, unfinished at the time of his death, was published posthumously.^ BEARDED ANARCHIST We have to know what he was working on at the time of his death.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His work, most of which was published posthumously, continues to be a source of research, scholarship and philosophical discussion in diverse academic, literary and popular arenas.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In Kafka's time it was the Laurenziberg and he used it for the setting of Description of a Struggle , the story he wrestled with in secret when he was 20 before showing it to Brod who had it published posthumously.
  • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

[2]

Contents

Biography

Kafka at the age of five
.Kafka was born into a middle-class Jewish family in Prague, the capital of Bohemia.^ Franz Kafka was born on July 3, 1883, into a middle-class Jewish family.
  • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ When Kafka was a boy, the street was called Niklasstrasse and it was smack in the midst of the old Jewish ghetto which was being cleansed of its fetid slums to make way for middle-class apartment houses.
  • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ His parents were upwardly mobile middle class, his father setting up a dry goods store and his mother coming from a well-to-do family.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.
The former house of Franz Kafka.
^ Franz Kafka lived in this building, called the House at the Minute, near Old Town Square, from 1889 to 1896.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On the right, House of the Stone Ram is where Albert Einstein played his violin for Franz Kafka when he was a professor at Prague German University 1911 - 1912 .
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Franz Kafka lived at one time in a house behind the Church of Our Lady of Tyn.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

It now stands as a memorial open to the public without fee, but also contains items related to Kafka and Prague for sale.
.His father, Hermann Kafka (1852–1931), was described as a "huge, selfish, overbearing businessman"[3] and by Kafka himself as "a true Kafka in strength, health, appetite, loudness of voice, eloquence, self-satisfaction, worldly dominance, endurance, presence of mind, [and] knowledge of human nature". Hermann was the fourth child of Jacob Kafka, a ritual slaughterer, and came to Prague from Osek, a Czech-speaking Jewish village near Písek in southern Bohemia.^ Hermann’s father had been a village butcher in Bohemia.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermann Kafka was born September 14, 1852 in the little town of Wossek, about sixty miles south of Prague, near Pisek, the fourth child of a butcher, Jacob Kafka.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka’s November 1919 letter to his father is an indictment filled with near-hate for his own father.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.After working as a traveling sales representative, he established himself as an independent retailer of men's and women's fancy goods and accessories, employing up to 15 people and using a jackdaw (kavka in Czech) as his business logo.^ Yours and Swaim’s are the only videos I actually watch on Cracked, but your columns are also very nice - keep up the good work!
  • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In his autobiographical work "Brief an der Vater" ("Letter to the Father"), written in 1919, Kafka blamed his father for his inability to break his family ties and establish an independent married life for himself.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He quickly scurried up over it and pressed himself against the glass which held it in place and which made his hot abdomen feel good.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

.Kafka's mother, Julie (1856—1934), was the daughter of Jakob Löwy, a prosperous brewer in Poděbrady, and was better educated than her husband.^ Kafka’s mother, Julie Löwy (1856-1934) came from an orthodox Jewish family.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You understand the world better than any of us, Kafka.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka’s diaries and letters indicate that he considered Gregor Samsa’s alienated fate in The Metamorphosis no worse, or better, than that of any person.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[4]
Franz was the eldest of six children.[5] .He had two younger brothers: Georg and Heinrich, who died at the ages of fifteen months and six months, respectively, before Franz was seven; and three younger sisters, Gabriele ("Elli") (1889–1941), Valerie ("Valli") (1890–1942), and Ottilie ("Ottla") (1892–1943).^ Kafka’s three sisters also died in Nazi concentration camps.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ She says she had a little boy in 1914 that died at the age of seven, in 1921.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ McManis, a fourth-year senior, was part of Walker's final recruiting class to NU. Walker died suddenly from a heart attack on June 29, 2006, less than two months before the start of preseason camp.
  • Mike Kafka - College Football Nation Blog - ESPN 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC espn.go.com [Source type: General]

On business days, both parents were absent from the home. .His mother helped to manage her husband's business and worked in it as much as 12 hours a day.^ No matter how much the mother and sister might at that point work on him with small admonitions, for a quarter of an hour he would remain shaking his head slowly, his eyes closed, without standing up.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ The mother would pull him by the sleeve and speak flattering words into his ear; the sister would leave her work to help her mother, but that would not have the desired effect on the father.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ They had hour days together in Vienna, but Kafka could not sustain the relationship, and Milen did not want to leave her husband.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

The children were largely reared by a series of governesses and servants. .Franz's relationship with his father was severely troubled as explained in the Letter to His Father in which he complained of being profoundly affected by his father's authoritative and demanding character.^ Franz's relationship with his father was, to put it lightly, tempestuous, and would end up becoming the basis of much of his work.-Kafkas father was a bully, both to his wife and to Kafka himself.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Franz Kafka's Letter to his Father .
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.During World War II, Franz's sisters were sent with their families to the Łódź Ghetto and died there or in concentration camps.^ Kafka’s three sisters also died in Nazi concentration camps.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During World War II, Elli and Valli and their families were shipped off to the Lodz ghetto, and apparently died in the uprisings there or were sent to death camps.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This bureaucratic nightmare is the world of Kafka, which Hubben suggests existed throughout Europe before World War II: .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Ottla was sent to the concentration camp at Theresienstadt and then on October 7, 1943 to the death camp at Auschwitz, where 1267 children and 51 guardians, including Ottla, were gassed to death on their arrival.^ Here's the entry in Auschwitz Chronicle 1939-1945 by Danuta Czech 7 October [1943] 1,260 Jewish children and their 53 care givers are transferred from Theresienstadt in an RSHA transport.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ottla separated from her Gentile husband, Josef David, since she felt she had no right to avoid the suffering of her people, and was sent to the Theresienstadt (Terezin) concentration camp in northwestern Bohemia.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ She volunteered, in 1943, to help accompany a trainload of children somewhere, which turned out to be Auschwitz.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[6]

Education

Kinsky Palace where Kafka attended gymnasium and his father later owned a shop
.Kafka's first language was German, but he was also fluent in Czech.^ In referring to this work, the first edition--the one available to Kafka--will be cited; section numbers will be given in parentheses to facilitate use of other editions, English and German.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ German was the language of the Kafka household, with Yiddish spoken at times, but Hermann Kafka was careful not to present himself as either “too Jewish” or “too German” to do any damage to his business.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At this time the vast majority of people in Prague spoke Czech, but owing to the power of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the language of the elites was German.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[7] .Later, Kafka acquired some knowledge of French language and culture; one of his favorite authors was Flaubert.^ Likening this piece to Kafka’s work is like comparing one’s penis to that of some superhero whose power is his extraordinarily robust and mighty wang.
  • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ For some time he lived with his sister, Ottla, long his favorite Kafka family member.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When describing Kafka, he u ...more I can't say this book is one of my favorites, but I can't say I hated it.
  • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

From 1889 to 1893, he attended the Deutsche Knabenschule, the boys' elementary school at the Masný trh/Fleischmarkt (meat market), the street now known as Masná street. .His Jewish education was limited to his Bar Mitzvah celebration at 13 and going to the synagogue four times a year with his father, which he loathed.^ His religious upbringing was limited mostly to that and going to the synagogue four times a year with his father, which didn't give him much to go on.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ After a lengthy layoff, the Wildcats play on New Year's Day for the first time in 13 years and search for their first bowl victory since the 1949 Rose Bowl.
  • Mike Kafka - College Football Nation Blog - ESPN 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC espn.go.com [Source type: General]

^ Historically Bar Mitzvah is the ceremonial occasion that marks the time when a young person is recognized as an adult in the Jewish community and is responsible for performing Mitzvot (commandments).
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[8] .After elementary school, he was admitted to the rigorous classics-oriented state gymnasium, Altstädter Deutsches Gymnasium, an academic secondary school with eight grade levels, where German was also the language of instruction, at Old Town Square, within the Kinsky Palace.^ Franz Kafka lived in this building, called the House at the Minute, near Old Town Square, from 1889 to 1896.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Prague, the Altstadter Ring (Old Town Square), around the time that Kafka was working on The Castle 1922 .
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the Old Town Square the great clock on the cathedral strikes six.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

He completed his Maturita exams in 1901.[citation needed]
.Admitted to the Charles-Ferdinand University of Prague, Kafka first studied chemistry, but switched after two weeks to law.^ Brod studied law at the University of Prague, and in 1902 he met and befriended Kafka.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1901 he graduated from the Altstdter Gymnasium, and went on to Charles Ferdinand University, where at first he decided to study chemistry, as one of his friends was doing.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Franz in 1906, just after receiving his doctorate in law from Charles University.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.This offered a range of career possibilities, which pleased his father, and required a longer course of study that gave Kafka time to take classes in German studies and art history.^ We have tried what is humanly possible to take care of it and to be patient.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ It is possible Kafka was looking to prove to his father he was "normal" and planned to settle and start a family.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It is possible Kafka did admire his father’s ability to exist in a country where Jews were constantly under attack.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.At the university, he joined a student club, named Lese- und Redehalle der Deutschen Studenten, which organized literary events, readings and other activities.^ Das Gesetz, die Anklage und K.s Prozess: Franz Kafka und Franz Brentano in Jahrbuch der deutschen Schillergesellschaft 24 (1980) 333-356.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In the end of his first year of studies, he met Max Brod, who would become a close friend of his throughout his life, together with the journalist Felix Weltsch, who also studied law.^ Max Brod, Kafka's lifelong friend.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Brod was to be a close friend and editor throughout Kafka’s life.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During this period of productivity, Kafka met Max Brod, a writer, critic, and editor of Prager Tagblatt .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Kafka obtained the degree of Doctor of Law on 18 June, 1906 and performed an obligatory year of unpaid service as law clerk for the civil and criminal courts.^ In June 1906, he graduated with a doctorate in law.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Franz in 1906, just after receiving his doctorate in law from Charles University.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ After receiving his law degree, Kafka worked briefly for an Italian insurance company.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[2]

Employment

.On November 1, 1907, he was hired at the Assicurazioni Generali, a large Italian insurance company, where he worked for nearly a year.^ After receiving his law degree, Kafka worked briefly for an Italian insurance company.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Passport photographs 1911-1912 taken at the time Kafka began working for the Workers Accident Insurance Company.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He got his first job at the Assicurizioni Generali Insurance Company in 1907 but soon left, due to the lengthy hours and intolerable conditions.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.His correspondence, during that period, witnesses that he was unhappy with his working time schedule—from 8 p.m.^ "On the other hand, Schofield stumbled once when asked to change directions during bag work and looked stiff in space during the team period.
  • Mike Kafka - Big Ten Blog - ESPN 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC espn.go.com [Source type: General]

(20:00) until 6 a.m. (06:00)—as it made it extremely difficult for him to concentrate on his writing. .On 15 July 1908, he resigned, and two weeks later found more congenial employment with the Worker's Accident Insurance Institute for the Kingdom of Bohemia.^ In 1922 he resigned from his position at the workers’ insurance.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There is his job, of course, his life at the Workers’ Accident Insurance Institute for the Kingdom of Bohemia in Prague to which he will send a note saying he will be late on account of a dizzy spell the night after he writes ‘The Judgement’.

^ Later, in 1908, he began working at the Workers' Accident Insurance Institute, where he would work most of the rest of his life, although only sporadically after 1917, and in June 1922 he was put on "temporary retirement" with a pension.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.The job involved investigating personal injury to industrial workers, and assessing compensation.^ The year he was hired, Kafka wrote “On Mandatory Insurance in the Construction Industry,” a report demonstrating the need for insurance to protect construction workers and families in the event of injury.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The year he was hired, Kafka wrote “On Mandatory Insurance in the Construction Industry,” a report demonstrating the need for insurance to protect construction workers’ earnings and families in the event of injury.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.His father often referred to his son's job as insurance officer as a "Brotberuf", literally "bread job", a job done only to pay the bills.^ Only when the Officer was fully naked did they start to pay attention.
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ Suddenly, Georg’s father begins to dance about, proclaiming that his son is marrying only because Georg has slept with the woman.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

While Kafka often claimed that he despised the job, he was a diligent and capable employee. He was also given the task of compiling and composing the annual report and was reportedly quite proud of the results, sending copies to friends and family. .In parallel, Kafka was also committed to his literary work.^ It certainly tends to generate in some critics the conviction that Kafkas works are not comprehensible at all, and it strengthens in others the conviction that effort at comprehension is altogether misplaced in the study of literary works.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

Together with his close friends Max Brod and Felix Weltsch, these three were called "Der enge Prager Kreis", the close Prague circle, which was part of a broader Prague Circle, "a loosely knit group of German-Jewish writers who contributed to the culturally fertile soil of Prague from the 1880s till after World War I."[9]
.In 1911, Karl Hermann, spouse of his sister Elli, asked Kafka to collaborate in the operation of an asbestos factory known as Prager Asbestwerke Hermann and Co.^ An only child for six years, Kafka’s sisters Elli, Valli, and Ottla were born in 1889, 1890, and 1892, respectively.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1911, however, this state of affairs was shattered when his father wanted him to take charge of his brother-in-law Karl Hermann's asbestos factory, which took up a lot of his time until 1917 (when it was shut down) and literally almost drove him to suicide.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The parents with Elli Kafka's sister, her husband Karl Hermann they were married 1911 and their son Felix, on summer holiday, 1914.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.Kafka showed a positive attitude at first, dedicating much of his free time to the business.^ German was the language of the Kafka household, with Yiddish spoken at times, but Hermann Kafka was careful not to present himself as either “too Jewish” or “too German” to do any damage to his business.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For the first time the face of the Condemned Man showed signs of real life.
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ Northwestern quarterback Mike Kafka is really showing up on the NFL radar , Sean Jensen writes in the Chicago Sun-Times.
  • Mike Kafka - Big Ten Blog - ESPN 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC espn.go.com [Source type: General]

.During that period, he also found interest and entertainment in the performances of Yiddish theatre, despite the misgivings of even close friends such as Max Brod, who usually supported him in everything else.^ Max Brod, Kafka's lifelong friend.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Everything in the machine interested him.
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ During this period of productivity, Kafka met Max Brod, a writer, critic, and editor of Prager Tagblatt .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

Those performances also served as a starting point for his growing relationship with Judaism.[10]

Later years

.In 1912, at Max Brod's home, Kafka met Felice Bauer, who lived in Berlin and worked as a representative for a dictaphone company.^ Max Brod, Kafka's lifelong friend.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ While attending a small party at the home of Max Brod’s father on 13 August 1912, Kafka met Felice Bauer, a secretarial assistant in a Berlin office.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Two met at the home of Max Brod's father.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.Over the next five years they corresponded a great deal, met occasionally, and twice were engaged to be married.^ Just over five years old, this trendy wine shop is great for the casual and cultured wine drinker alike.
  • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

^ He had in these five years, the first holidays of his laborious but unsuccessful life, put on a good deal of fat and thus had become really heavy.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ They were married on September 3, 1882 and Franz, named for Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary, came along less than a year later.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

Their relationship finally ended in 1917.
.In 1917, Kafka began to suffer from tuberculosis, which would require frequent convalescence during which he was supported by his family, most notably his sister Ottla.^ Sometime thereafter, most likely during the same semester, < 338 > Kafka began participating in private colloquia held by Marty at his home and continued to do so for three years.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I would support Gladstone against most of them, apart from Chris Bucholz because Chris Bucholz is even more ignored and unloved than Gladstone.
  • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kafka's sisters Valli, Elli, Ottla, around 1898.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.Despite his fear of being perceived as both physically and mentally repulsive, he impressed others with his boyish, neat, and austere good looks, a quiet and cool demeanor, obvious intelligence and dry sense of humor.^ As a blind judgment may be true without being perceived to be true so a blind love or hate may be correct without its correctness being perceived, i.e., evident in a transferred sense.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

[11]
.Kafka developed an intense relationship with Czech journalist and writer Milena Jesenská.^ Their relationship seems to have been close, with Milena’s own diaries indicating they made love several times when Kafka visited her.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ FRANZ KAFKA BIOGRAPHY (1883-1924) Jewish Czech-born Writer Franz Kafka is considered to be one of the most important and influential writers of the 20th century.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka met Milena Jesenská-Pollak (also “Jesenska-Polack”), a Czech writer, in 1920.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.In July of 1923, throughout a vacation to Graal-Müritz on the Baltic Sea, he met Dora Diamant and briefly moved to Berlin in the hope of distancing himself from his family's influence to concentrate on his writing.^ His family was poor and at the age of 18 he moved to Prague in hopes of bettering his situation.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They met in July in the resort town of Graal-Moritz on the German coast of the Baltic Sea and hit it off more or less immediately.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dora was only 19 when the pair moved to Berlin.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.In Berlin, he lived with Diamant, a 25-year-old kindergarten teacher from an orthodox Jewish family, who was independent enough to have escaped her past in the ghetto.^ In the summer of 1923, owing to his interest in Judaism and Zionism, Franz was trying to learn Hebrew (which had been taught at school but didn't make an impression on him at the time), and went through a couple of teachers before meeting Dora Diamant, born 1904, a 25-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl who could read Hebrew fluently.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermann Kafka had located his store just beyond the Jewish ghetto of Prague, and even had his family legally declared Czech nationals.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka’s mother, Julie Löwy (1856-1934) came from an orthodox Jewish family.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.She became his lover, and influenced Kafka's interest in the Talmud.^ Possibly influenced by his mother, Kafka became obsessed with Jewish mythology, history, and the Yiddish language.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[12]
.It is generally agreed that Kafka suffered from clinical depression and social anxiety throughout his entire life.^ Kafka spent his life in perpetual depression and blamed alternately his father and himself.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Brod was to be a close friend and editor throughout Kafka’s life.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.March 2007" style="white-space:nowrap;">[citation needed] He also suffered from migraines, insomnia, constipation, boils, and other ailments, all usually brought on by excessive stresses and strains.^ As I attempted to evolve my own style, I found Kafka, Ambrose Bierce, H. L. Mencken, and the other writers I admired all possessed the same dark wit.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Recent research into Kafka's migraine headaches has suggested that he may have suffered from cluster headaches, also referred to as "suicide headaches", a recurring and debilitating neurological condition triggering frequent headaches, characterized by one of the highest degrees of pain known to medical science.^ KAFKA (staring into steaming coffee cup) Gabriela was right -- it's easier for me to understand suicide.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The issue of whether virtue is or is not teachable is central to the dialog Protagoras , which we have suggested as one of Kafkas sources for the motives in theory of law that are illustrated in Joseph K.s trial.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In the terms of Kafkas parable, the door leading into the Law stands open always, that is to say at all times so that neither the Court nor anyone else may ever close it.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

.January 2010" style="white-space:nowrap;">[citation needed] He attempted to counteract all of this by a regimen of naturopathic treatments.^ As I attempted to evolve my own style, I found Kafka, Ambrose Bierce, H. L. Mencken, and the other writers I admired all possessed the same dark wit.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

However, Kafka's tuberculosis worsened; he returned to Prague, then went to Dr. Hoffmann's sanatorium in Kierling near Vienna for treatment, where he died on June 3, 1924, apparently from starvation. .The condition of Kafka's throat made eating too painful for him, and since parenteral nutrition had not yet been developed, there was no way to feed him.^ So there is no escape for Kafka; literature and life defeat him, each in a different way.

^ This is the uncanny experience of reading Kafka : there is no point of fixity to which one can anchor oneself.

^ "There is a goal, but no way; what we call a way is hesitation."
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.His body was ultimately brought back to Prague where he was buried on June 11, 1924, in the New Jewish Cemetery (sector 21, row 14, plot 33) in Prague-Žižkov.^ Prague, June 10, 1924.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The funeral was held on June 10th at the Jewish Cemetery in Prague.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The burial will take place on Wednesday afternoon, June 11, at 3:45, at the Jewish Cemetery in Straschnitz.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

Judaism and Zionism

.Kafka was not formally involved in Jewish religious life, but he showed a great interest in Jewish culture and spirituality.^ The Twobecame close friends and Lwy would tell Kafka about his Eastern Jewish upbringing in Poland, which Kafka found very interesting.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Lacking this perspective, attempts to interpret Kafkas sense of the Law from ethical or from religious perspectives involve a falsification.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka was surely aware of these machines; he had a great deal of interest in technology.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

He was well versed in Yiddish literature, and loved Yiddish theater.[13]
In his essay, Sadness in Palestine?!, Dan Miron explores Kafka's connection to Zionism. ."It seems that those who claim that there was such a connection and that Zionism played a central role in his life and literary work, and those who deny the connection altogether or dismiss its importance, are both wrong.^ The analysis leads him to conclude that deliberate meaninglessness is the only inherent meaning to be found in Kafkas works by those who are so misguided as to try comprehending them.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ And now Im asking you: Should such a lifes work, he pointed to the machine, come to nothing because of this Commandant and the women influencing him?
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ He passes some working-class types who seem vaguely threatening.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

.The truth lies in some very elusive place between these two simplistic poles."^ Ekman, who doesn't hear very well, directs one ear in particular back and forth between the other two.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Here are some of the more notable cases, but between the two companies there are over 100 cases.
  • Deepwater DooDoo - If Franz Kafka built boats for the Coast Guard... 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.ostgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[13]
.According to James Hawes, Kafka, though much aware of his own Jewishness, did not incorporate his Jewishness into his work.^ It is much too easy to see the Kafka name in “Samsa” — there was no effort by the author to hide the fact he was writing a story about his own emotional state.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Franz's relationship with his father was, to put it lightly, tempestuous, and would end up becoming the basis of much of his work.-Kafkas father was a bully, both to his wife and to Kafka himself.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka's biography reads almost like a critical analysis of his work, for so much of the neurotic tension ...
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

"There is zero actual Jewishness" nor any Jewish characters or specifically Jewish scenes in his work, says Hawes.[14] In the opinion of literary critic Harold Bloom, author of The Western Canon, however, "Despite all his denials and beautiful evasions, [Kafka's writing] quite simply is Jewish writing."[10] Lothar Kahn is likewise unequivocal: "The presence of Jewishness in Kafka's oeuvre is no longer subject to doubt."[15] .Pavel Eisner, one of Kafka's first translators, interprets the classic, The Trial, as the "triple dimension of Jewish existence in Prague is embodied in Kafka's The Trial: his protagonist Josef K. is (symbolically) arrested by a German (Rabensteiner), a Czech (Kullich), and a Jew (Kaminer).^ Josef attempts to explain the trial’s importance, as his very existence is at stake.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In referring to this work, the first edition--the one available to Kafka--will be cited; section numbers will be given in parentheses to facilitate use of other editions, English and German.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ "Intercourse with human beings seduces one to self contemplation" Minze Eisner Kafka met her in Schelesen and advised her in her plans to run a farm.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.He stands for the "guiltless guilt" that imbues the Jew in the modern world, although there is no evidence that he himself is a Jew."^ There was no such guilt.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ There's no way to know for certain, although probably not.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At the sight of Gregor, who, totally surprised, began to scamper here and there, although no one was chasing him, she remained standing with her hands folded across her stomach staring at him.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

[16]
.Livia Rothkirchen calls Kafka the "symbolic figure of his era". His era included numerous other Jewish writers (Czech, German, and national Jews) who were sensitive to German, Czech, Austrian, and Jewish culture.^ Living at home was difficult for Kafka, who suffered from hyper-sensitivity to noise and a desire for solitude.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The 12ft tall bronze sculpture, a walking headless figure with Kafka sitting on the shoulders, was created by a Czech artist Jaroslav Rona.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The game features two efficient passers in Kafka and Tigers senior Chris Todd , who ranks 21st nationally in passer rating.
  • Mike Kafka - College Football Nation Blog - ESPN 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC espn.go.com [Source type: General]

According to Rothkirchen, "This situation lent their writings a broad cosmopolitan outlook and a quality of exaltation bordering on transcendental metaphysical contemplation. An illustrious example is Franz Kafka."[16]

Literary career

Franz Kafka's grave in Prague-Žižkov.
.Kafka's writing attracted little attention until after his death.^ From late 1917 until June 1919, Franz Kafka stopped writing entries in his diary, which he kept in...
  • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ CUT: KAFKA'S HOUSE - NIGHT Alone again in his little room, Kafka writes on into the night.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The two remain together until Kafka’s death.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.During his lifetime, he published only a few short stories and never finished any of his novels, unless The Metamorphosis is considered a (short) novel.^ Only “The Trial”, which was never actually finished.
  • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ During May 1924, Kafka was editing one of his best short stories: A Hunger Artist .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Only Kafka knows why K does not leave the village — and only Kafka knows if he intended to finish the novel.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Prior to his death, Kafka wrote to his friend and literary executor Max Brod: "Dearest Max, my last request: Everything I leave behind me ...^ Kafka and his friends preparing to leave.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Max Brod, Kafka's lifelong friend.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ KAFKA It's my last and final one.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

in the way of diaries, manuscripts, letters .(my own and others'), sketches, and so on, [is] to be burned unread."^ As I attempted to evolve my own style, I found Kafka, Ambrose Bierce, H. L. Mencken, and the other writers I admired all possessed the same dark wit.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[17] .Brod overrode Kafka's wishes, believing that Kafka had given these directions to him specifically because Kafka knew he would not honor them—Brod had told him as much.^ Since his transformation these were the first words which she had directed right at him.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ I almost wish Murakami had got into playing jazz, or directing films, because I feel that he is good at mood, good at developing interesting imagery, good at storytelling in general.
  • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Kafka has a history of reading a lot, and from reading so much, it is gathered that he has learned a lot from these authors.
  • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

.(His lover, Dora Diamant, also ignored his wishes, secretly keeping up to 20 notebooks and 35 letters until they were confiscated by the Gestapo in 1933. An ongoing international search is being conducted for these missing Kafka papers.^ They wrote each other many letters and built up a kind of friendship.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The desk assistant at the library, who immediately befriends Kafka, often references mythology--these references all end up being manifestations of the characters and the plot itself.
  • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Her parentsthe father had, of course, woken up with a start in his arm chairat first looked at her astonished and helpless, until they started to get agitated.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

) .Brod, in fact, would oversee the publication of most of Kafka's work in his possession, which soon began to attract attention and high critical regard.^ Max Brod convinced Kafka to publish some of his work, and in January 1913 Meditation, a collection of some early short stories and sketches, appeared.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafkas works are regarded as an impenetrable shield behind which a certain interpretation of interpretation on the one hand and poetry in general on the other can be advanced triumphantly.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Notable exceptions are to be found in Wilhelm Emrichs Franz Kafka, A Critical Study of his Work , trns.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

.All of Kafka's published works, except several letters he wrote in Czech to Milena Jesenská, were written in German.^ One suspects a kind of ruse: Kafka, after all, dreams of leaving writing in order to emigrate to Palestine ; he puts down his work to take up carpentry.

^ By end of Act One Kate prevails: Franz fitfully dictates to Kate the love letter to Milena he wrote in real life: Because of I love you, I love the whole world.
  • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It is worth noting Kafka himself had an aversion to sex and all forms of pleasure, yet found himself visiting brothels at the time this story was written.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

Writing style

.Kafka often made extensive use of a trait special to the German language allowing for long sentences that sometimes can span an entire page.^ German was the language of the Kafka household, with Yiddish spoken at times, but Hermann Kafka was careful not to present himself as either “too Jewish” or “too German” to do any damage to his business.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As a result of Kafka’s use of the German language, his works did not appear in a translated form in Czechoslovakia for more than a decade after his death.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Kafka's sentences then deliver an unexpected impact just before the full stop—that being the finalizing meaning and focus.^ CUT: GABRIELA'S SECTION Kafka working his way toward Gabriela's desk -- but he stops before he gets to it, a familiar shiver running through him.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

This is achieved due to the construction of certain sentences in German which require that the verb be positioned at the end of the sentence. .Such constructions cannot be duplicated in English, so it is up to the translator to provide the reader with the same effect found in the original text.^ While I cannot read his works in their original forms, the English translations are striking.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In such cases, we will provide to you an explanation of why access cannot be provided and contact information for further inquiries.
  • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ To provide herself with independent means, she took up journalism, and in 1919 wrote to Kafka asking permission to translate his works.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[18]
.Another virtually insurmountable problem facing the translator is how to deal with the author's intentional use of ambiguous terms or of words that have several meanings.^ Malware -- short for MALicious softWARE -- is a term used to broadly classify a form of software which is installed in a computer system with malicious intentions, usually without the owner's knowledge or permission.
  • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ When we use the term " Other Information ", we mean any information other than Personal Information collected by the Site (Personal Information and Other Information, together, the " Information ").
  • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ First they will not give the OIG the documents and access the OIG requested, and then they take the biased report and use it as an excuse about how the OIG could find any problems.
  • Deepwater DooDoo - If Franz Kafka built boats for the Coast Guard... 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.ostgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.One such instance is found in the first sentence of The Metamorphosis.^ Consider the simple bluntness of the first sentence to The Metamorphosis : .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.English translators have often sought to render the word Ungeziefer as "insect"; in Middle German, however, Ungeziefer literally means "unclean animal not suitable for sacrifice"[19] and is sometimes used colloquially to mean "bug" – a very general term, unlike the scientific sounding "insect". Kafka had no intention of labeling Gregor as any specific thing, but instead wanted to convey Gregor's disgust at his transformation.^ "As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When we use the term " Other Information ", we mean any information other than Personal Information collected by the Site (Personal Information and Other Information, together, the " Information ").
  • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ Thus he knows Two things at once, and both with equal assurance: that there is no God, and that there must be God" Erich Heller, Franz Kafka .
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.Another example is Kafka's use of the German noun Verkehr in the final sentence of The Judgment.^ In referring to this work, the first edition--the one available to Kafka--will be cited; section numbers will be given in parentheses to facilitate use of other editions, English and German.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ As a result of Kafka’s use of the German language, his works did not appear in a translated form in Czechoslovakia for more than a decade after his death.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

Literally, Verkehr means intercourse and, as in English, can have either a sexual or non-sexual meaning; in addition, it is used to mean transport or traffic. The sentence can be translated as: "At that moment an unending stream of traffic crossed over the bridge."[20] What gives added weight to the obvious double meaning of 'Verkehr' is Kafka's confession to Max Brod that when he wrote that final line, he was thinking of "a violent ejaculation".[21] In the English translation, of course, what can 'Verkehr' be but "traffic?"[22]

Critical interpretations

Bronze statue of Franz Kafka in Prague.
.Critics have interpreted Kafka's works in the context of a variety of literary schools, such as modernism, magical realism, and so on.^ Many critics claim Kafka’s works are in fact tributes to the religious and mystic heritage of European Jews, but his own anti-Semitic streak is evident in his diaries.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ What I like about the surreal or magical-realistic aspect of Kafka is that it's so grounded in reality, all of the details have been so thoroughly researched, that it feels real.
  • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Kafka's biography reads almost like a critical analysis of his work, for so much of the neurotic tension ...
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[23] .The apparent hopelessness and absurdity that seem to permeate his works are considered emblematic of existentialism.^ Kafka’s works meet the basic criteria of existentialism, while adding the additional depth of postmodern absurdity.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Others have tried to locate a Marxist influence in his satirization of bureaucracy in pieces such as In the Penal Colony, The Trial, and The Castle,[23] whereas others point to anarchism as an inspiration for Kafka's anti-bureaucratic viewpoint.^ They confront each other, Kafka trying not to cringe too baldly.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The story opens with a traveler being given a tour of a penal colony by its governor, or “the officer,” as Kafka’s narrator refers to him.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There are hundreds of essays, books, and academic articles on The Castle ; I personally fail to see this work as any better than Kafka’s others.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Still others have interpreted his works through the lens of Judaism (Borges made a few perceptive remarks in this regard), through freudianism[23] (because of his familial struggles), or as allegories of a metaphysical quest for God (Thomas Mann was a proponent of this theory).^ But, ultimately, he realized that whoever was on the other side of that door still worked for Cracked and, therefore, was likely functionally retarded.
  • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But the manager must have suspected something, because he made a leap down over a few stairs and disappeared, still shouting Huh!
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ I place it at the end of a Kafka reading list because it represents clarity Kafka often lacked in his other works.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[citation needed]
.Themes of alienation and persecution are repeatedly emphasized, and the emphasis on this quality, notably in the work of Marthe Robert, partly inspired the counter-criticism of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, who argued in Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature that there was much more to Kafka than the stereotype of a lonely figure writing out of anguish, and that his work was more deliberate, subversive, and more "joyful" than it appears to be.^ KAFKA It's more than hollow.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Granted, I was soon discovered to be nothing more than a phony, but once again, Kafka came to the rescue: we ran out of wine and I, having saved so much money on my first bottle, decided to buy an extra bottle to last the rest of the evening.
  • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

^ KAFKA Has one more look over at the empty desk before returning to his work.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

.Furthermore, an isolated reading of Kafka's work — focusing on the futility of his characters' struggling without the influence of any studies on Kafka's life — reveals the humor of Kafka.^ As with Kafka’s other works, the reader meets a man witnessing an absurd form of “justice” — a legal system without logic.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ One must wonder if this somehow relates to Kafka and his inability to work during the last years of his life.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And now Im asking you: Should such a lifes work, he pointed to the machine, come to nothing because of this Commandant and the women influencing him?
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

.Kafka's work, in this sense, is not a written reflection of any of his own struggles, but a reflection of how people invent struggles.^ KAFKA This morning it was suggested to me that my own sense of office fellowship could bear improving.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ How did Kafka intend to end the work?
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ My favorite work by Kafka, Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk , an exploration of how artists relate to society.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[citation needed]
.Biographers have said that it was common for Kafka to read chapters of the books he was working on to his closest friends, and that those readings usually concentrated on the humorous side of his prose.^ CUT: CONTINENTAL COFFEE HOUSE - NIGHT Bizzlebek, perched on his usual stool, turns to see Kafka at his side.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Also, do not ever compare your work to Franz Kafka’s ever again, even if you are attempting to parody said work, which is another endeavor that I also recommend you never undertake to do again.
  • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There are hundreds of essays, books, and academic articles on The Castle ; I personally fail to see this work as any better than Kafka’s others.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Milan Kundera refers to the essentially surrealist humour of Kafka as a main predecessor of later artists such as Federico Fellini, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes and Salman Rushdie.^ Most notably, the artists in Kafka’s stories are no longer essential to their communities but insist on remaining true to their natures.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Three days later Milena presented an obituary, referring to Kafka as “a man condemned to regard the world with such blinding clarity that he found it unbearable and went to his death.” .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ By the time he began writing The Castle , Kafka had shortened the name of his main character to “K,” a man without a name but again a likely reference to the author.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

For García Márquez, it was as he said the reading of Kafka's The Metamorphosis that showed him "that it was possible to write in a different way."

Law and legality in Kafka's fiction

.Many attempts have been made to examine Kafka’s legal background and the role of law in his fiction.^ Lacking this perspective, attempts to interpret Kafkas sense of the Law from ethical or from religious perspectives involve a falsification.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The sort of natural law theory Kafka is most likely to have had in mind must be weighed most carefully in any discussion of the role played by the Law in K.s trial.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

.These attempts remain relatively few in number compared to the vast collection of literature devoted to the study of his life and works, and marginal to legal scholarship.^ In 2004, as I worked my way up the chain in order to find satisfactory resolutions of these matters I attempted to schedule a meeting with Mr. Moosally.
  • Deepwater DooDoo - If Franz Kafka built boats for the Coast Guard... 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.ostgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Mainstream studies of Kafka’s works normally present his fiction as an engagement with absurdity, a critique of bureaucracy or a search for redemption, failing to account for the images of law and legality which constitute an important part of “the horizon of meaning” in his fiction.^ As with Kafka’s other works, the reader meets a man witnessing an absurd form of “justice” — a legal system without logic.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ After receiving his law degree, Kafka worked briefly for an Italian insurance company.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka’s works meet the basic criteria of existentialism, while adding the additional depth of postmodern absurdity.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.Many of his descriptions of the legal proceedings in The Trial – metaphysical, absurd, bewildering and “Kafkaesque” as they might appear – are, in fact, based on accurate and informed descriptions of German and Austrian criminal proceedings of the time.^ At the same moment, however, he did not forget to remind himself from time to time of the fact that calmindeed the calmestreflection might be much better than confused decisions.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ He might still claim that the law is without authority or that it is an absurd and irrational one, but he would presumably be able to tell whether he had in fact behaved in a way forbidden by the law.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The significance of law in Kafka’s fiction is also neglected within legal scholarship, for as Richard Posner pointed out, most lawyers do not consider writings about law in the form of fiction of any relevance to the understanding or the practice of law.^ One would need only to point out the law in question and show K. how his behavior had violated it.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ And there is indeed something very mysterious about the process of detection and arrest, something so mysterious that it would have to be considered totally arbitrary when judged by normal legal standards.
  • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Something about the OIG pointing out that the ships were not seaworthy, and that there would be nobody to rescue to Coastguardsman when the ships went down bothered the Admiral for some reason.
  • Deepwater DooDoo - If Franz Kafka built boats for the Coast Guard... 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.ostgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Regardless of the concerns of mainstream studies of Kafka with redemption and absurdity, and what jurists such as Judge Posner might think relevant to law and legal practice, the fact remains that Kafka was an insurance lawyer who, besides being involved in litigation, was also “keenly aware of the legal debates of his day” (Ziolkowski, 2003, p.^ After receiving his law degree, Kafka worked briefly for an Italian insurance company.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ INSPECTOR (hands Kafka his card) -- Should you happen upon anything that might be relevant.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Brod studied law at the University of Prague, and in 1902 he met and befriended Kafka.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

224).[24]
.
In a recent study which uses Kafka's office writings[25] as its point of departure, Reza Banakar argues that "legal images in Kafka’s fiction are worthy of examination, not only because of their bewildering, enigmatic, bizarre, profane and alienating effects, or because of the deeper theological or existential meaning they suggest, but also as a particular concept of law and legality which operates paradoxically as an integral part of the human condition under modernity.
^ I would suggest the greatest sin, especially in existentialism, is a failure to be authentic in the sense Jean-Paul Sartre used the term.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Brod studied law at the University of Prague, and in 1902 he met and befriended Kafka.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Instead of dissecting the novel, I prefer to study the characters and how they reveal facets of Kafka to the reader.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.To explore this point Kafka’s conception of law is placed in the context of his overall writing as a search for Heimat which takes us beyond the instrumental understanding of law advocated by various schools of legal positivism and allows us to grasp law as a form of experience" (see Banakar 2010).^ But, when you consider the time, place, and nature of Kafka — then you see an existentialist.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If we define ontology as the quest for a description of the concepts and relationships that can exist for an agent or a community of agents, then all Kafka’s writings deal with the ontology of human, and therefore complex, relationships.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

Publications

.Much of Kafka's work was unfinished, or prepared for publication posthumously by Max Brod.^ Max Brod, Kafka's lifelong friend.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Max Brod convinced Kafka to publish some of his work, and in January 1913 Meditation, a collection of some early short stories and sketches, appeared.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Max Brod saved many of Kafka’s manuscript pages, despite the author’s request that all his notes and manuscripts be burned upon his death.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.The novels The Castle (which stopped mid-sentence and had ambiguity on content), The Trial (chapters were unnumbered and some were incomplete) and Amerika (Kafka's original title was The Man who Disappeared) were all prepared for publication by Brod.^ Amerika , stopped work on the novel in 1914.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ K: All three of you know who the real Kafka is, and you're conspiring to keep it from us.
  • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

^ After all, here was a man who was not a trained philosopher or disciplined writer.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.It appears Brod took a few liberties with the manuscript (moving chapters, changing the German and cleaning up the punctuation), and thus the original German text was altered prior to publication.^ His mother had once undertaken a major clean up of his room, which she had only completed successfully after using a few buckets of water.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

The editions by Brod are generally referred to as the Definitive Editions.
.According to the publisher's note[26] for The Castle,[27] Malcolm Pasley was able to get most of Kafka's original handwritten work into the Oxford Bodleian Library in 1961. The text for The Trial was later acquired through auction and is stored at the German literary archives[28] at Marbach, Germany.^ No, just kidding, but they'll let you bring your dog into the store, which, when you have the original bull in a china shop doesn't work so much, but is cute in theory.
  • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

^ Max Brod convinced Kafka to publish some of his work, and in January 1913 Meditation, a collection of some early short stories and sketches, appeared.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Prague, the Altstadter Ring (Old Town Square), around the time that Kafka was working on The Castle 1922 .
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

[29]
Subsequently, Pasley headed a team (including Gerhard Neumann, Jost Schillemeit, and Jürgen Born) in reconstructing the German novels and S. Fischer Verlag republished them.[30] Pasley was the editor for Das Schloß (The Castle), published in 1982, and Der Prozeß (The Trial), published in 1990. Jost Schillemeit was the editor of Der Verschollene (Amerika) published in 1983. These are all called the "Critical Editions" or the "Fischer Editions." The German critical text of these, and Kafka's other works, may be found online at The Kafka Project.[31]. This site is continuously building the repository.
.There is another Kafka Project based at San Diego State University, which began in 1998 as the official international search for Kafka's last writings.^ KAFKA I wonder if I might look to see if there's an address for family -- I thought I'd like to write to them.
  • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On 20 September 1912, Kafka began writing letters to Felice.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On September 20, Kafka began writing letters to Felice.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.Consisting of 20 notebooks and 35 letters to Kafka's last companion, Dora Diamant (later, Dymant-Lask), this missing literary treasure was confiscated from her by the Gestapo in Berlin 1933. The Kafka Project's four-month search of government archives in Berlin in 1998 uncovered the confiscation order and other significant documents.^ K: We uncover the real Kafka, then he gives us the Notebooks and we go home!
  • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From time to time he stood up from the table and pulled out of the small lockbox salvaged from his business, which had collapsed five years previously, some document or other or some notebook.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ On September 20, Kafka began writing letters to Felice.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

.In 2003, the Kafka Project discovered three original Kafka letters, written in 1923. Building on the search conducted by Max Brod and Klaus Wagenbach in the mid-1950s, the Kafka Project at SDSU has an advisory committee of international scholars and researchers, and is calling for volunteers who want to help solve a literary mystery.^ Max Brod, Kafka's lifelong friend.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ K: All three of you know who the real Kafka is, and you're conspiring to keep it from us.
  • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During this period of productivity, Kafka met Max Brod, a writer, critic, and editor of Prager Tagblatt .
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[32]
In 2008, academic and Kafka expert James Hawes accused scholars of suppressing details of the pornography Kafka subscribed to (published by the same man who was Kafka's own first publisher) in order to preserve his image as a quasi-saintly "outsider".[14]

Translations

There are two primary sources for the translations based on the two German editions. .The earliest English translations were by Edwin and Willa Muir and published by Alfred A. Knopf.^ His popularity increased exponentially after the publication of his stories in the 20s and 30s, especially in the English translations done by the Muirs.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

These editions were widely published and spurred the late-1940s surge in Kafka's popularity in the United States. Later editions (notably the 1954 editions) had the addition of the deleted text translated by Eithne Wilkins and Ernst Kaiser. These are known as "Definitive Editions." .They translated both The Trial, Definitive and The Castle, Definitive among other writings.^ They began writing to each other in 1920 and very occasionally saw each other.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ After a while, in 1923, Milena and Pollak were reconciled, and Franz broke off the relationship, saying they shouldn't see each other or write.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka’s The Trial and The Castle show promise, but they languished either ignored or put aside by the author.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

Definitive Editions are generally accepted to have a number of biases and to be dated in interpretation.
.After Pasley and Schillemeit completed their recompilation of the German text, the new translations were completed and published – The Castle, Critical by Mark Harman (Schocken Books, 1998), The Trial, Critical by Breon Mitchell (Schocken Books, 1998) and Amerika: The Man Who Disappeared by Michael Hoffman (New Directions Publishing, 2004).^ Kafkas relationship with his father comes out in some of his books as a hopeless conflict against an overwhelming power: for example, in The Trial, or The Castle.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

These editions are often noted as being based on the restored text.

Published works

Short stories
Many collections of the stories have been published, and they include:
.
  • The Penal Colony: Stories and Short Pieces.^ Few stories affect a political discussion quite like In The Penal Colony .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The story opens with a traveler being given a tour of a penal colony by its governor, or “the officer,” as Kafka’s narrator refers to him.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Schocken Books, 1948.
  • The Complete Stories, (ed.^ I write stories in New York, in the shadow of the great publishers of the world.
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    Nahum N. Glatzer). .New York: Schocken Books, 1971.
  • The Basic Kafka.^ G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston; Franz Kafka: A Biography (New York: Da Capo Press, 1937.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka, Franz; The Basic Kafka with Introduction by Erich Heller (New York: Washington Square Press, Simon & Schuster, 1946, 1979) ISBN: 067153145X [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Pocket Books, 1979.
  • The Sons.^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Schocken Books, 1989.
  • The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories.^ I write stories in New York, in the shadow of the great publishers of the world.
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Few stories affect a political discussion quite like In The Penal Colony .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Citing his story In the Penal Colony , in which the Explorer fails to stop the torture, Franz implores Kate, who earlier looked out for the other fellow and held herself out as counterforce, to stop the carnage to come.
    • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

    .New York: Schocken Books, 1995.
  • Contemplation.^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    Twisted Spoon Press, 1998.
  • Metamorphosis and Other Stories. Penguin Classics, 2007
Novellas
Novels
Diaries and notebooks
Letters

Commemoration

The entrance to the Franz Kafka museum in Prague.
.Franz Kafka has a museum dedicated to his work in Prague, Czech Republic.^ One of the last works by Franz Kafka, The Burrow reveals the secret life of a mole-like creature.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermann Kafka’s anger at home might have been viewed by Franz as a symptom of Prague itself.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermann Kafka had located his store just beyond the Jewish ghetto of Prague, and even had his family legally declared Czech nationals.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.The term "Kafkaesque" is widely used to describe concepts, situations, and ideas which are reminiscent of Kafka's works, particularly The Trial and The Metamorphosis.^ Commentaries Franz Kafka is best known for describing absurd situations with simple, cold words.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Easily Kafka’s most famous work, Metamorphosis deals with the acceptance of an absurd fate.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In Kafka’s stories the greatest sin, as in existentialism, is a failure to be authentic in the sense Jean-Paul Sartre used the term.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

.In Mexico, the phrase "Si Franz Kafka fuera mexicano, sería costumbrista" (If Franz Kafka were Mexican, he would be a Costumbrista writer) is commonly used in newspapers, blogs, and online forums to tell how hopeless and absurd the situation in the country is.^ Franz Kafka the absurdity of everything Many professors of literature would prefer that I not group Kafka among the existentialists.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Commentaries Franz Kafka is best known for describing absurd situations with simple, cold words.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kafka’s characters seem to accept their situations, no matter how grim.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[33]
.It has been noted that "from the Czech point of view, Kafka was German, and from the German point of view he was, above all, Jewish" and that this was a common "fate of much of Western Jewry."^ German was the language of the Kafka household, with Yiddish spoken at times, but Hermann Kafka was careful not to present himself as either “too Jewish” or “too German” to do any damage to his business.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Trial represents a common theme in Kafka’s stories: all people are guilty of something and the punishments are in inverse proportion to the sin.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermann Kafka had located his store just beyond the Jewish ghetto of Prague, and even had his family legally declared Czech nationals.
  • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

[9]

Literary and cultural references

Literature

.
  • Nobel Prize winner Isaac Bashevis Singer wrote a short story called "A Friend of Kafka," which was about a Yiddish actor called Jacques Kohn who said he knew Franz Kafka.^ Franz sells a short story—and another, and another.
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ At the moment he was lying right there on the carpet, and no one who knew about his condition would have seriously demanded that he let the manager in.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ During May 1924, Kafka was editing one of his best short stories: A Hunger Artist .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .In this story, according to Jacques Kohn, Kafka believed in the Golem, a legendary creature from Jewish folklore.^ With Löwy’s help, Kafka began to study Jewish folklore.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    [34]
  • .
  • Kafka Americana by Jonathan Lethem and Carter Scholz is a collection of stories based on Kafka's life and works.
  • Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
  • Kafka was the Rage, a Greenwich Village Memoir by Anatole Broyard
  • Kafka's Curse by Achmat Dangor
  • The Kafka Effekt by American bizarro author D. Harlan Wilson, who relates his take on the irrealism genre of literature to that of Franz Kafka, and to that of William S. Burroughs.
  • Criminal (comics) by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips contains, within a re-occurring comic strip seen in characters newspapers, the adventures of 'Franz Kafka PI'. The 4th story arc of the book also involves the creator of the strip.^ Known for its “story-within,” The Trial was one of Kafka’s favorite works.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Franz Kafka the absurdity of everything Many professors of literature would prefer that I not group Kafka among the existentialists.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These elements of Kafka’s personality can be observed in the characters of his stories.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    There is talk of a spin off series written by Matt Fraction.

Short stories

Film

  • Kafka (1990) Jeremy Irons stars as the eponymous author. .Written by Lem Dobbs and directed by Steven Soderbergh, the movie mixes his life and fiction providing a semi-biographical presentation of Kafka's life and works.^ One must wonder if this somehow relates to Kafka and his inability to work during the last years of his life.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One of the last works by Franz Kafka, The Burrow reveals the secret life of a mole-like creature.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ During the final months of his life, Kafka was reduced to communicating via written notes.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The story concerns Kafka investigating the disappearance of one of his work colleagues.^ I find this story one of Kafka’s best works.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Known for its “story-within,” The Trial was one of Kafka’s favorite works.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ KAFKA Has one more look over at the empty desk before returning to his work.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The plot takes Kafka through many of the writer's own works, most notably The Castle and The Trial.
  • Franz Kafka (1992) at the Internet Movie Database : an animated film by Piotr Dumała
  • The Trial (1962) Orson Welles wrote and directed this adaptation of the novel starring Anthony Perkins, Jeanne Moreau, and Romy Schneider.^ Franz Kafka was the writer I most wanted to emulate as a student.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Franz Kafka the absurdity of everything Many professors of literature would prefer that I not group Kafka among the existentialists.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is possible had Kafka lived a full life his writings might have evolved, but The Castle leads me to wonder if he had stagnated as a writer.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .In a 1962 BBC Interview with Huw Wheldon, Orson Welles noted, "Say what you like, but The Trial is the best film I have ever made".
  • Klassenverhältnisse Class Relations (1984) Directed by the experimental filmmaking duo of Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet based on Kafka's novel Amerika.
  • The Trial (1993) Starring Kyle MacLachlan as Joseph K. with Anthony Hopkins in a cameo role as the priest as a strictly faithful adaptation with a screenplay by playwright Harold Pinter.
  • A Movie Adaptation of (The Castle) Das Schloß (1997) at the Internet Movie Database by Michael Haneke.^ KAFKA You look like brothers.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gunther Kafka: I may be old, but I know a thing or two about punks like you.
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ KAFKA (leans forward in rebuttal) Well, I -- CHIEF CLERK (keeps pacing) Oh, I know you got along with that poor fellow -- what was his name?
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    More on Das Schloß (film)
  • In an episode of Adult Swim's Home Movies (TV Series), Duane of the rock group Scab wrote a rock opera about the life of Franz Kafka and played the title character.
  • Suda51 is planning to make a game based on The Castle entitled "Kurayami".
  • Kafka goes to the Forest (2009) a short experimental film directed by Daniel Matos, the movie is a surreal representation of his last days internal conflicts.

Metamorphosis

Theatre

.
  • Alan Bennett, Kafka's Dick, 1986, a play in which the ghosts of Kafka, his father Hermann, and Max Brod arrive at the home of an English insurance clerk (and Kafka aficionado) and his wife.
  • Milan Richter, Kafka's Hell-Paradise, 2006, a play with 5 characters, using Kafka's aphorisms, dreams and re-telling his relations to his father and to the women.^ During this period of productivity, Kafka met Max Brod, a writer, critic, and editor of Prager Tagblatt .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hermann Kafka’s anger at home might have been viewed by Franz as a symptom of Prague itself.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ CUT: THE CHIEF CLERK - DAY Looks up from his desk and sticks his chin out, which is his way of asking Kafka what the hell he wants.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    Translated from the Slovak by Ewald Osers.
  • Milan Richter, Kafka's Second Life, 2007, a play with 17 characters, starting in Kierling where Kafka is dying and ending in Prague in 1961. Translated from the Slovak by Ewald Osers.
  • Tadeusz Różewicz, Pułapka (The Trap), 1982, a play loosely based on Kafka's diaries and letters

Music

.
  • Hungarian composer György Kurtág wrote a piece for soprano and violin, using fragments of Kafka's diary and letters: Kafka-Fragmente (op.^ Kafka’s diaries and letters indicate that he considered Gregor Samsa’s alienated fate in The Metamorphosis no worse, or better, than that of any person.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The portrait of Franz Kafka that I paint in this play is at variance with his death-loving stereotype but represents the real Kafka, which I discovered in studying his diaries, letters, and fiction.
    • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka’s diaries and letters indicate that he considered Gregor’s fate no worse, or better, than that of any person.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    24, 1985).
  • Russian hip-hop band 2H Company refers to The Metamorphosis in their probably most famous song "Adaptation". The main hero of the song read the novella before going to bed, and then had a dream that caused all humans' bodies transformation.
  • Australian band Lost Valentinos released their song "Kafka" on a 2005 EP release titled "The Valentinos". The track "Kafka" uses imparted knowledge of Kafka's death as a symbolism of frustration and desperate helplessness in the downfall of a relationship.
  • In the song "Eleven Saints" by Jason Webley Kafka is metioned in the lyrics, "...we're just sittin' by the train tracks reading Kafka to the sky,".
  • Josef Tal’s last opera Josef (1993), is inspired in part by Franz Kafka Josef Tal – In Memoriam

See also

References

  1. ^ Franz Kafka Franz Kafka
  2. ^ a b (Spanish)Contijoch, Francesc Miralles (2000) "Franz Kafka". Oceano Grupo Editorial, S.A. Barcelona. ISBN 84-494-1811-9.
  3. ^ Corngold 1973
  4. ^ Gilman, Sander L. (2005) Franz Kafka. Reaktion Books Ltd. London, UK. p. 20–21. ISBN 1-88187-264-5.
  5. ^ Hamalian ([1975], 3).
  6. ^ Danuta Czech: Kalendarz wydarzeń w KL Auschwitz, Oświęcim 1992, p. 534. In the archives of the camp a list with the names of the guardians was preserved.
  7. ^ Derek Sayer, "The language of nationality and the nationality of language: Prague 1780-1920 - Czech Republic history", Past and Present, 1996; 153: 164 - 210.
  8. ^ Letter to his Father, p. 150
  9. ^ a b The Metamorphosis and Other Stories, notes. Herberth Czermak. Lincoln, Nebraska: Cliffs Notes 1973, 1996.
  10. ^ a b "Kafka and Judaism". Victorian.fortunecity.com. http://victorian.fortunecity.com/vermeer/287/judaism.htm. Retrieved 28 May 2009. 
  11. ^ Ryan McKittrick speaks with director Dominique Serrand and Gideon Lester about Amerika www.amrep.org
  12. ^ Lothar Hempel www.atlegerhardsen.com
  13. ^ a b "Sadness in Palestine". Haaretz.com. http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1040561.html. Retrieved 28 May 2009. 
  14. ^ a b Franz Kafka’s porn brought out of the closet - Times Online at entertainment.timesonline.co.uk
  15. ^ Lothar Kahn, in Between Two Worlds: a cultural history of German-Jewish writers, page 191
  16. ^ a b Livia Rothkirchen, The Jews of Bohemia and Moravia: facing the Holocaust, University of Nebraska Press, 2005 p.23
  17. ^ Quoted in Publisher's Note to The Castle, Schocken Books.
  18. ^ Kafka (1996, xi).
  19. ^ ungeziefer : Dictionary / Wörterbuch (BEOLINGUS, TU Chemnitz)
  20. ^ Kafka (1996, 75).
  21. ^ Brod. Max: "Franz Kafka, a Biography". (trans. Humphreys Roberts) New York: Schocken Books,1960. p. 129.
  22. ^ Kafka (1996, xii).
  23. ^ a b c Franz Kafka 1883 – 1924 www.coskunfineart.com
  24. ^ For an overview of studies which focus on Kafka's images of law see Banakar, Reza. "In Search of Heimat: A Note on Franz Kafka's Concept of Law". Forthcoming in Law and Literature 2010. An e-copy available at: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1491034
  25. ^ Corngold, Stanley et. al., (eds.) Franz Kafka: The Office Writings. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2009.
  26. ^ A Kafka For The 21st century by Arthur Samuelson, publisher, Schocken Books www.jhom.com
  27. ^ Schocken Books, 1998
  28. ^ (German) Herzlich Willkommen www.dla-marbach.de
  29. ^ (publisher's note, The Trial, Schocken Books, 1998
  30. ^ Stepping into Kafka’s head, Jeremy Adler, Times Literary Supplement, 13 October 1995 <http://www.textkritik.de/rezensionen/kafka/einl_04.htm>
  31. ^ The Kafka Project – all Kafka text in German According to the Manuscript www.kafka.org
  32. ^ Sources: Kafka, by Nicolas Murray, pages 367, 374; Kafka's Last Love, by Kathi Diamant; "Summary of the Results of the Kafka Project Berlin Research 1 June – September 1998" published in December 1998 Kafka Katern, quarterly of the Kafka Circle of the Netherlands. More information is available at http://www.kafkaproject.com
  33. ^ Aquella, Daniel (22 November 2006). "México kafkiano y costumbrista". Daquella manera:Paseo personal por inquietudes culturales, sociales y lo que tengamos a bien obrar.. http://www.daquellamanera.org/?q=node/144. Retrieved 16 February 2007. 
  34. ^ Bashevis Singer, Isaac (1970). A Friend of Kafka, and Other Stories. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. p. 311. ISBN 0-37415-880-0. 
  35. ^ (German) Menschenkörper movie website www.menschenkoerper.de

Bibliography

  • Adorno, Theodor. Prisms. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1967.
  • Banakar, Reza. ."In Search of Heimat: A Note on Franz Kafka's Concept of Law". Forthcoming in Law and Literature volume 22, 2010. [1]
  • Corngold, Stanley.^ Franz Kafka the absurdity of everything Many professors of literature would prefer that I not group Kafka among the existentialists.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    Introduction to The Metamorphosis. Bantam Classics, 1972. ISBN 0-553-21369-5.
  • Hamalian, Leo, ed. Franz Kafka: A Collection of Criticism. .New York: McGraw-Hill, 1974. ISBN 0-07-025702-7.
  • Heller, Paul.^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka, Franz; The Basic Kafka with Introduction by Erich Heller (New York: Washington Square Press, Simon & Schuster, 1946, 1979) ISBN: 067153145X [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    Franz Kafka: Wissenschaft und Wissenschaftskritik. Tuebingen: Stauffenburg, 1989. ISBN 3-923-72140-4.
  • Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. Trans. Donna Freed. .New York: Barnes & Noble, 1996. ISBN 1-56619-969-7.
  • Kafka, Franz.^ G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston; Franz Kafka: A Biography (New York: Da Capo Press, 1937.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka, Franz; The Basic Kafka with Introduction by Erich Heller (New York: Washington Square Press, Simon & Schuster, 1946, 1979) ISBN: 067153145X [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    Kafka's Selected Stories. Norton Critical Edition. Trans. Stanley Corngold. .New York: Norton, 2005. ISBN 9780393924794.
  • Brod, Max.^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Franz Kafka: A Biography. New York: Da Capo Press, 1995. ISBN 0-306-80670-3
  • Brod, Max.^ Franz Kafka ; Brod, p.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ During this period of productivity, Kafka met Max Brod, a writer, critic, and editor of Prager Tagblatt .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston; Franz Kafka: A Biography (New York: Da Capo Press, 1937.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The Biography of Franz Kafka, tr.^ G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston; Franz Kafka: A Biography (New York: Da Capo Press, 1937.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Existential Primer: Franz Kafka [ Select Biography ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Biography Franz Kafka was born in Prague, in what is now part of the Czech Republic, on 3 July 1883.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    from the German by G. Humphreys Roberts. .London: Secker & Warburg, 1947. OCLC 2771397
  • Calasso, Roberto.^ Diamant, Kathi; Kafka’s Last Love: The Mystery of Dora Diamant (London: Secker & Warburg, 2003) .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    K. Knopf, 2005. ISBN 1-4000-4189-9
  • Citati, Pietro, Kafka, 1987. ISBN 0-7859-2173-7
  • Coots, Steve. Franz Kafka (Beginner's Guide). Headway, 2002, ISBN 0-340-84648-8
  • Deleuze, Gilles & Félix Guattari. Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature (Theory and History of Literature, Vol 30). Minneapolis, University of Minnesota, 1986. ISBN 0-8166-1515-2
  • Danta, Chris. "Sarah's Laughter: Kafka's Abraham" in Modernism/modernity 15:2 ([2] April 2008), 343–59.
  • Glatzer, Nahum N., The Loves of Franz Kafka. .New York: Schocken Books, 1986. ISBN 0-8052-4001-2
  • Greenberg, Martin, The Terror of Art: Kafka and Modern Literature.^ Kafka, Franz; The Basic Kafka with Introduction by Erich Heller (New York: Washington Square Press, Simon & Schuster, 1946, 1979) ISBN: 067153145X [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston; Franz Kafka: A Biography (New York: Da Capo Press, 1937.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .New York, Basic Books, 1968. ISBN 0-465-08415-X
  • Gordimer, Nadine (1984).^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka, Franz; The Basic Kafka with Introduction by Erich Heller (New York: Washington Square Press, Simon & Schuster, 1946, 1979) ISBN: 067153145X [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ."Letter from His Father" in Something Out There, London, Penguin Books.^ Something about the OIG pointing out that the ships were not seaworthy, and that there would be nobody to rescue to Coastguardsman when the ships went down bothered the Admiral for some reason.
    • Deepwater DooDoo - If Franz Kafka built boats for the Coast Guard... 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.ostgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ISBN 0-14-007711-1
  • Hayman, Ronald. K, a Biography of Kafka. London: Phoenix Press, 2001.ISBN 1-84212-415-3
  • Janouch, Gustav. Conversations with Kafka. .New York: New Directions Books, second edition 1971. (Translated by Goronwy Rees.^ Mairowitz, David Zane and Crumb, Robert; Introducing Kafka (New York: Totem Books, 1993, 1997) ISBN: 1-874166-09-9 [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    )ISBN 0-8112-0071-X
  • Murray, Nicholas. Kafka. New Haven: Yale, 2004.
  • Pawel, Ernst. .The Nightmare of Reason: A Life of Franz Kafka. New York: Vintage Books, 1985. ISBN 0-374-52335-5
  • Thiher, Allen (ed.^ One of the last works by Franz Kafka, The Burrow reveals the secret life of a mole-like creature.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka, Franz; The Basic Kafka with Introduction by Erich Heller (New York: Washington Square Press, Simon & Schuster, 1946, 1979) ISBN: 067153145X [ Amazon.com ] .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston; Franz Kafka: A Biography (New York: Da Capo Press, 1937.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ). .Franz Kafka: A Study of the Short Fiction (Twayne's Studies in Short Fiction, No.^ The portrait of Franz Kafka that I paint in this play is at variance with his death-loving stereotype but represents the real Kafka, which I discovered in studying his diaries, letters, and fiction.
    • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thiher, Allen; Franz Kafka: A Study of the Short Fiction (Boston: Twayne, 1990) .
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kafka Three: No Franz!
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    12). .ISBN 0-8057-8323-7
  • Philippe Zard: La fiction de l'Occident : Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Albert Cohen, Paris, P.U.F., 1999.
  • Philippe Zard (ed) : Sillage de Kafka, Paris, Le Manuscrit, 2007, ISBN 2-7481-8610-9.
  • Ziolkowski, Theodore, The Mirror of Justice: Literary Reflections of Legal Crisis.^ As with Kafka’s other works, the reader meets a man witnessing an absurd form of “justice” — a legal system without logic.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The portrait of Franz Kafka that I paint in this play is at variance with his death-loving stereotype but represents the real Kafka, which I discovered in studying his diaries, letters, and fiction.
    • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Franz was verbally assaulted by his father often, a fact reflected in much of Kafka’s stories and within his diaries.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2003 (first ed. 1997)

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.
From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
^ F. Kafka: From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.

^ "From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
  • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
  • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

That is the point that must be reached.
.Franz Kafka (3 July 18833 June 1924) was a Bohemian-Jewish novelist, and was one of the major German-language fiction writers of the 20th century.^ Franz Kafka was born on July 3, 1883, into a middle-class Jewish family.
  • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

^ Biography Biography of Franz Kafka (1883-1924).
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (Kafka Franz 1883 1924 Schloss) OR (Kafka Franz 1883 1924 Criticism and interpretation)  - 4 results .
  • Kafka's Castle by Ronald Gray at Questia Online Library 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

Contents

Sourced

.
  • Verlassen sind wir doch wie verirrte Kinder im Walde.^ Verlassen sind wir doch wie verirrte Kinder im Walde.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Wenn Du vor mir stehst und mich ansiehst, was weißt Du von den Schmerzen, die in mir sind und was weiß ich von den Deinen.^ Wenn Du vor mir stehst und mich ansiehst, was weißt Du von den Schmerzen, die in mir sind und was weiß ich von den Deinen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ich glaube, man sollte überhaupt nur solche Bücher lesen, die einen beißen und stechen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Das Böse ist eine dunkle Macht, die besiegt werden kann, und wir, die Leser, sind auch dann auf der Seite des Guten, wenn wir nicht verstehen, was vor sich geht."

    .Und wenn ich mich vor Dir niederwerfen würde und weinen und erzählen, was wüßtest Du von mir mehr als von der Hölle, wenn Dir jemand erzählt, sie ist heiß und fürchterlich.^ Wenn Du vor mir stehst und mich ansiehst, was weißt Du von den Schmerzen, die in mir sind und was weiß ich von den Deinen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Und wenn ich mich vor Dir niederwerfen würde und weinen und erzählen, was wüßtest Du von mir mehr als von der Hölle, wenn Dir jemand erzählt, sie ist heiß und fürchterlich.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Das Böse ist eine dunkle Macht, die besiegt werden kann, und wir, die Leser, sind auch dann auf der Seite des Guten, wenn wir nicht verstehen, was vor sich geht."

    .Schon darum sollten wir Menschen vor einander so ehrfürchtig, so nachdenklich, so liebend stehn wie vor dem Eingang zur Hölle.
    • We are as forlorn as children lost in the woods.^ Schon darum sollten wir Menschen vor einander so ehrfürchtig, so nachdenklich, so liebend stehn wie vor dem Eingang zur Hölle.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ We are as forlorn as children lost in the woods.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "We are as forlorn as children lost in the wood.
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      .When you stand in front of me and look at me, what do you know of the griefs that are in me and what do I know of yours.^ When you stand in front of me and look at me, what do you know of the griefs that are in me and what do I know of yours.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ When you stand in front of me an look at me, what do you know of the grief's that are in me and what do I know of yours.
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ While reading was never a hobby of mine… I have noticed that it can be fun to have that good feeling in your gut when you know you can have an intelligent conversation about a certain topic.

      .And if I were to cast myself down before you and weep and tell you, what more would you know about me than you know about Hell when someone tells you it is hot and dreadful?^ And if I were to cast myself down before you and weep and tell you, what more would you know about me than you know about Hell when someone tells you it is hot and dreadful?
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ All you have to do is read about it, and you know it.

      ^ And if I were to cast myself down before you and tell you, what more would you know about me that you know about Hell when someone tells you it is hot and dreadful?
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      .For that reason alone we human beings ought to stand before one another as reverently, as reflectively, as lovingly, as we would before the entrance to Hell.
    • Letter to Oskar Pollak, November 8, 1903; cited from Max Brod (ed.^ For that reason alone we human beings ought to stand before one another as reverently, as reflectively, as lovingly, as we would before the entrance to Hell."
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ For that reason alone we human beings ought to stand before one another as reverently, as reflectively, as lovingly, as we would before the entrance to Hell.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Letter to Oskar Pollak, November 8, 1903; cited from Max Brod (ed.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ) .Briefe, 1902-1924 (New York: Schocken, 1958) p.^ New York, Schocken Books, 1982.
      • NYSL Travels: Franz Kafka's Prague, A Literary Walking Tour (Marylin Bender) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nysoclib.org [Source type: General]

      ^ New York: Schocken, 1953.
      • ENG-FL 394 Kafka Syllabus Spring 2000 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www4.ncsu.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Willa and Edwin Muir (New York: Schocken, 1946), 283, henceforth GW, followed by the page number.
      • J. Hillis Miller 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.usc.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .27. Translation from Frederick R. Karl Franz Kafka, Representative Man (New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1991) p.^ The Trial (ISBN: 0805204164 / 0-8052-0416-4 ) Kafka, Franz Bookseller: Patrico Books (Apollo Beach, FL, U.S.A.) Bookseller Rating: Quantity Available: 1 Book Description: Schocken Books, New York, New York, U.S.A., 1987.
      • Kafka - Trial - AbeBooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.abebooks.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Translation from Frederick R. Karl Franz Kafka, Representative Man (New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1991) p.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I • II • III “Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka Copyright © 2002 David Wyllie (translator) but can be reproduced freely (see original plain-text version ).
      • Metamorphosis (by Franz Kafka) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.authorama.com [Source type: Original source]

      .98
  • Ich glaube, man sollte überhaupt nur solche Bücher lesen, die einen beißen und stechen.^ Ich glaube, man sollte überhaupt nur solche Bücher lesen, die einen beißen und stechen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wenn Du vor mir stehst und mich ansiehst, was weißt Du von den Schmerzen, die in mir sind und was weiß ich von den Deinen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mein Gott, glücklich wären wir eben auch, wenn wir keine Bücher hätten, und solche Bücher, die uns glücklich machen, könnten wir zur Not selber schreiben.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Wenn das Buch, das wir lesen, uns nicht mit einem Faustschlag auf den Schädel weckt, wozu lesen wir dann das Buch?^ Wenn das Buch, das wir lesen, uns nicht mit einem Faustschlag auf den Schädel weckt, wozu lesen wir dann das Buch?
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Das Böse ist eine dunkle Macht, die besiegt werden kann, und wir, die Leser, sind auch dann auf der Seite des Guten, wenn wir nicht verstehen, was vor sich geht."

    ^ Wir brauchen aber die Bücher, die auf uns wirken wie ein Unglück, das uns sehr schmerzt, wie der Tod eines, den wir lieber hatten als uns, wie wenn wir in Wälder verstoßen würden, von allen Menschen weg, wie ein Selbstmord, ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Damit es uns glücklich macht, wie Du schreibst?^ Damit es uns glücklich macht, wie Du schreibst?
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Mein Gott, glücklich wären wir eben auch, wenn wir keine Bücher hätten, und solche Bücher, die uns glücklich machen, könnten wir zur Not selber schreiben.^ Mein Gott, glücklich wären wir eben auch, wenn wir keine Bücher hätten, und solche Bücher, die uns glücklich machen, könnten wir zur Not selber schreiben.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wenn das Buch, das wir lesen, uns nicht mit einem Faustschlag auf den Schädel weckt, wozu lesen wir dann das Buch?
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ich glaube, man sollte überhaupt nur solche Bücher lesen, die einen beißen und stechen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Wir brauchen aber die Bücher, die auf uns wirken wie ein Unglück, das uns sehr schmerzt, wie der Tod eines, den wir lieber hatten als uns, wie wenn wir in Wälder verstoßen würden, von allen Menschen weg, wie ein Selbstmord, ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns.^ Wir brauchen aber die Bücher, die auf uns wirken wie ein Unglück, das uns sehr schmerzt, wie der Tod eines, den wir lieber hatten als uns, wie wenn wir in Wälder verstoßen würden, von allen Menschen weg, wie ein Selbstmord, ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wenn das Buch, das wir lesen, uns nicht mit einem Faustschlag auf den Schädel weckt, wozu lesen wir dann das Buch?
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Schon darum sollten wir Menschen vor einander so ehrfürchtig, so nachdenklich, so liebend stehn wie vor dem Eingang zur Hölle.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Das glaube ich.
    • I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us.^ Altogether, I think we ought to read only books that bite and sting us.

      ^ Das glaube ich.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .If the book we are reading doesn't wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?
      ...we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide.^ What we must have are those books that come on us like ill fortune, like the death of one we love better than ourselves, like suicide.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us...We need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide.
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Read more about this book .
      • Powell's Books - Review-a-Day - The Tremendous World I Have Inside My Head: Franz Kafka: A Biographical Essay by Louis Begley, reviewed by New York Review of Books 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.powells.com [Source type: General]

      .A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us.
    • Letter to Oskar Pollak (27 January 1904)
    • Variant translations:
      If the book we are reading does not wake us, as with a fist hammering on our skulls, then why do we read it? Good God, we also would be happy if we had no books and such books that make us happy we could, if need be, write ourselves.^ Good God, we'd be just as happy if we had no books at all; books that make us happy we could, in a pinch, also write ourselves.

      ^ So that it can make us happy, as you put it?

      ^ A book should be an ice-axe to break the frozen sea within us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .What we must have are those books that come on us like ill fortune, like the death of one we love better than ourselves, like suicide.^ This was one of those books that totally engulfed me.
      • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

      ^ "I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us...We need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide.
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ You understand the world better than any of us, Kafka.
      • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

      .A book must be an ice axe to break the sea frozen inside us.^ A book should be an ice-axe to break the frozen sea within us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A book must be an ice axe to break the sea frozen inside us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us."
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]


      .What we need are books that hit us like a most painful misfortune, like the death of someone we loved more than we love ourselves, that make us feel as though we had been banished to the woods, far from any human presence, like a suicide.^ What we must have are those books that come on us like ill fortune, like the death of one we love better than ourselves, like suicide.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ What we need are books that hit us like a most painful misfortune, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, that make us feel as though we had been banished to the woods, far from any human presence, like a suicide.

      ^ "I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us...We need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide.
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

      .A book must be the ax for the frozen sea within us.
      A book should be an ice-axe to break the frozen sea within us.
      ^ A book should be an ice-axe to break the frozen sea within us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A book must be an ice axe to break the sea frozen inside us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us."
      • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]


      .A book must be an ice-axe to break the seas frozen inside our soul.^ A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A book should serve as the ax for the frozen sea within us.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A book must be an ice-axe to break the seas frozen inside our soul.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


      .A book should serve as the ax for the frozen sea within us.
  • Now the Sirens have a still more fatal weapon than their song, namely their silence...^ Books should be axes for the frozen sea within us, books should wound!
    • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A book should be an ice-axe to break the frozen sea within us.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A book must be an ice axe to break the sea frozen inside us.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Someone might possibly have escaped from their singing; but from their silence, certainly never.
    • "The Silence of the Sirens" (October 1917)
  • In this love you are like a knife, with which I explore myself.^ Someone might possibly have escaped from their singing; but from their silence, certainly never.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The Silence of the Sirens" (October 1917) In this love you are like a knife, with which I explore myself.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You might also like these Top 5 25 50 sellers of people who bought Automatic Kafka .
    • Automatic Kafka Comic Books. Automatic Kafka Comics store. 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.newkadia.com [Source type: General]

  • There is hope, but not for us.
    • Statement to Max Brod, quoted in Franz Kafka: A Biography [Franz Kafka, eine Biographie] (1937) by Max Brod, as translated by G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston (1947; 1960)

The Metamorphosis (1915)

Full text online
.
As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.
  • As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.^ The Powerful Opening of Kafka's Metamorphosis - The Powerful Opening of Kafka's Metamorphosis 'When Gregor Samsa woke up one morning from unsettling dreams, he found himself changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.'
    • Free Kafka Metamorphosis Essays 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.123helpme.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Free metamorphosis Essays 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.123helpme.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Kafka's Metamorphosis - Kafka's Metamorphosis "As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect" (Kafka 1757).
    • Free Kafka Metamorphosis Essays 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.123helpme.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Free metamorphosis Essays 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.123helpme.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic Ungeziefer .
    • F. Kafka, Everyman - The New York Review of Books 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.nybooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Original: Als Gregor Samsa eines Morgens aus unruhigen Träumen erwachte, fand er sich in seinem Bett zu einem ungeheuren Ungeziefer verwandelt.
    • First lines.
  • "Hey, there’s something falling down in there," said the chief clerk.^ Something’s fallen down in there”, said the chief clerk in the room on the left.
    • Metamorphosis (by Franz Kafka) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.authorama.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Original: Als Gregor Samsa eines Morgens aus unruhigen Träumen erwachte, fand er sich in seinem Bett zu einem ungeheuren Ungeziefer verwandelt.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Als Gregor Samsa eines morgens aus unruhigen träumen erwachte, fand er sich in seinem bett zu einem ungeheueren ungeziefer verwandelt.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Gregor tried to suppose to himself that what had happened to him might some day also happen to the chief clerk.^ Some have tried to bribe him, but he is incorruptible.
    • Kafka's "Before the Law" 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC myweb.wvnet.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gregor entertains the idea that the same may happen to the chief clerk himself some day.
    • Salem Press 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC salempress.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gregor tried to suppose to himself that what had happened to him might some day also happen to the chief clerk.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    There was no denying that anything was possible.

Aphorisms (1918)

Many of these statements in Kafka's notebooks were later published posthumously in Parables and Paradoxes (1946), and The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1954) as translated by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, Original German text
.
  • The true way is along a rope that is not spanned high in the air, but only just above the ground.^ Many of these statements in Kafka's notebooks were later published posthumously in Parables and Paradoxes (1946), and The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1954) as translated by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, Original German text The true way is along a rope that is not spanned high in the air, but only just above the ground.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Only it never arrives -- it's always just on its way.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In this way only half of his body could be seen, along with his head above it which he leant over to one side as he peered out at the others.
    • Metamorphosis (by Franz Kafka) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.authorama.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It seems intended more to cause stumbling than to be walked upon.
    • 1
  • All human errors are impatience, the premature breaking off of what is methodical, an apparent fencing in of the apparent thing.
    • 2; Variant translation: All human errors are impatience, a premature breaking off of methodical procedure, an apparent fencing-in of what is apparently at issue.
  • There are two main human sins from which all the others derive: impatience and indolence. It was because of impatience that they were expelled from Paradise; it is because of indolence that they do not return.^ "All human errors are impatience, a premature breaking off of methodical procedure, an apparent fencing-in of what is apparently at issue" " The life of society moves in a circle.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There are Two main human sins from which all the others derive: impatience and indolence.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because of impatience they were expelled, because of impatience they do not return."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Yet perhaps there is only one major sin: impatience.^ Yet perhaps there is only one major sin: impatience.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And there's only one way to remedy that: practice, practice, and more practice.
    • Study Guide to Franz Kafka's A Hunger Artist 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www-personal.ksu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In fact, in all of Kafka's writings there's only one victim; there is not a mass victim, there is only one, and that is Franz Kafka himself.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    .Because of impatience they were expelled, because of impatience they do not return.
  • 3, (20 October 1917); as published in The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1954); also in Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings (1954); variant translations use "cardinal sins" instead of "main human sins" and "laziness" instead of "indolence".
  • Beyond a certain point there is no return.^ October 1917); as published in The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1954); also in Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings (1954); variant translations use "cardinal sins" instead of "main human sins" and "laziness" instead of "indolence".
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .This point has to be reached.
    • 5; variant translations:
      From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.^ F. Kafka: From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.

      ^ Jump to: navigation , search From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ From a certain point onward there is no longer any turning back.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .That is the point that must be reached.
      • As quoted in The Unfinished Country: A Book of American Symbols (1959) by Max Lerner, p.^ That is the point that must be reached."
        • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ That is the point that must be reached.
        • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
        • Kafka on GameDay - Black Heart Gold Pants 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.blackheartgoldpants.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
        • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        ^ As quoted in The Unfinished Country: A Book of American Symbols (1959) by Max Lerner, p.
        • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        .452; also in Wait Without Idols (1964) by Gabriel Vahanian, p, 216, and in Joyce, Decadence, and Emancipation (1995) by Vivian Heller, 39
    • There is a point of no return.^ Wait Without Idols (1964) by Gabriel Vahanian, p, 216, and in Joyce, Decadence, and Emancipation (1995) by Vivian Heller, 39 There is a point of no return.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Beyond a certain point there is no return.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ This is the uncanny experience of reading Kafka : there is no point of fixity to which one can anchor oneself.

      .This point has to be reached.
  • The decisive moment in human evolution is perpetual. That is why the revolutionary spiritual movements that declare all former things worthless are in the right, for nothing has yet happened.^ The decisive moment in human evolution is perpetual.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That is why the revolutionary spiritual movements that declare all former things worthless are in the right, for nothing has yet happened.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But things are all right with me.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 6
  • One of the first signs of the beginnings of understanding is the wish to die.^ A first sign of the beginning of understanding is the wish to die.
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ One of the first signs of the beginnings of understanding is the wish to die.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A first sign of the beginning of understanding is the wish to Die" .
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .This life appears unbearable, another unattainable.^ This life appears unbearable, another unattainable.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .One is no longer ashamed of wanting to die; one asks to be moved from the old cell, which one hates, to a new one, which one will only in time come to hate.^ One is no longer ashamed of wanting to die; one asks to be moved from the old cell, which one hates, to a new one, which one will only in time come to hate.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Eduard is no longer the only casualty.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now it was really no longer a joke, and Gregor forced himself, come what might, into the door.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 13
  • A cage went in search of a bird.^ A cage went in search of a bird.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What else can happen but that the worlds split apart, and they do split apart, or at least clash in a fearful manner" "A cage went in search of a bird" .
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 16
  • If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without climbing it, it would have been permitted.^ If it had been permissible to build the Tower of Babel without climbing it, it would have beeb permitted.

    ^ If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without climbing it, it would have been permitted.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ November 1917) a slight variant of this was published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946): If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without ascending it, the work would have been permitted.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 18; (9 November 1917) a slight variant of this was published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946): If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without ascending it, the work would have been permitted.
  • Leopards break into the temple and drink to the dregs what is in the sacrificial pitchers; this is repeated over and over again; finally it can be calculated in advance, and it becomes a part of the ceremony.^ "If it had been possible to Built the Tower of Babel without ascending it, the work would have been permitted."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If it had been permissible to build the Tower of Babel without climbing it, it would have beeb permitted.

    ^ November 1917) a slight variant of this was published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946): If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without ascending it, the work would have been permitted.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 20 (10 November 1917)
  • From the true antagonist illimitable courage is transmitted to you.^ November 1917) From the true antagonist illimitable courage is transmitted to you.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gladstone Says: November 2nd, 2009 at 10:20 am This is like the 8th time I’ve tooled on myself and my buds here at Cracked.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Says: November 1st, 2009 at 10:02 am “You must be Cody, the new guy” .
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • 23
  • Hiding places there are innumerable, escape is only one, but possibilities for escape, again, are as many as hiding places.
.There is a goal, but no way; what we call a way is hesitation.^ "There is a goal, but no way; what we call a way is hesitation."
  • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There is a goal, but no way; what we call the way is only wavering.
  • J. Hillis Miller 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.usc.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ There is a goal, but no way; but what we call a way is hesitation.

.
    • 27
  • When one has once accepted and absorbed Evil, it no longer demands to be believed.^ When one has once accepted and absorbed Evil, it no longer demands to be believed.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His boss would certainly come round with the doctor from the medical insurance company, accuse his parents of having a lazy son, and accept the doctor’s recommendation not to make any claim as the doctor believed that no-one was ever ill but that many were workshy.
    • Metamorphosis (by Franz Kafka) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.authorama.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That was apparent really for the first time, now that he was no longer raised on his small limbs and nothing else distracted one from looking.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 28
  • The ulterior motives with which you absorb and assimilate Evil are not your own but those of Evil.
    The animal wrests the whip from its master and whips itself in order to become master, not knowing that this is only a fantasy produced by a new knot in the master’s whiplash.^ The ulterior motives with which you absorb and assimilate Evil are not your own but those of Evil.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The animal wrests the whip from its master and whips itself in order to become master, not knowing that this is only a fantasy produced by a new knot in the master’s whiplash.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you only followed the parables you yourselves would become parables and with that rid of all your daily cares.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka's "Before the Law" 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC myweb.wvnet.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 29
  • In a certain sense the Good is comfortless.^ In a certain sense the Good is comfortless.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 30
  • Self-control is something for which I do not strive.^ Self-control is something for which I do not strive.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Self-control means wanting to be effective at some random point in the infinite radiations of my spiritual existence.^ Self-control means wanting to be effective at some random point in the infinite radiations of my spiritual existence.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I mean hell's bells...if you are going BYOB, you just want some cheap vino, sans judgment.
    • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Some deny the existence of misery by pointing to the sun; he denies the existence of the sun by pointing to misery.

    .
    • 31
  • Martyrs do not underrate the body, they allow it to be elevated on the cross.^ Martyrs do not underrate the body, they allow it to be elevated on the cross.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .In this they are at one with their antagonists.^ In this they are at one with their antagonists.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 33
  • His weariness is that of the gladiator after the combat; his work was the whitewashing of a corner in a state official's office.^ His weariness is that of the gladiator after the combat; his work was the whitewashing of a corner in a state official's office.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His exhaustion is that of the gladiator after the fight, his work was the whitewashing of one corner in a clerk’s office.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 34; variant translation: His exhaustion is that of the gladiator after the fight, his work was the whitewashing of one corner in a clerk’s office.
  • Previously I did not understand why I got no answer to my question; today I do not understand how I could believe I was capable of asking.^ Previously I did not understand why I got no answer to my question; today I do not understand how I could believe I was capable of asking.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is one thing to be able to answer an appropriate question.
    • Study Guide to Franz Kafka's A Hunger Artist 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www-personal.ksu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His exhaustion is that of the gladiator after the fight, his work was the whitewashing of one corner in a clerk’s office.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But I didn’t really believe, I only asked.^ But I didn’t really believe, I only asked.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 36
  • The way is infinitely long, nothing of it can be subtracted, nothing can be added, and yet everyone applies his own childish yardstick to it.^ The way is infinitely long, nothing of it can be subtracted, nothing can be added, and yet everyone applies his own childish yardstick to it.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    “Certainly, this yard of the way you still have to go, too, and it will be accounted unto you.” .
    • 39
  • It is only our conception of time that makes us call the Last Judgment by this name.^ Certainly, this yard of the way you still have to go, too, and it will be accounted unto you.” 39 It is only our conception of time that makes us call the Last Judgment by this name.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He only had to bring his hand near the Harrow for it to rise and sink several times, until it had reached the correct position to make room for him.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Concepts of justice apply only to those inside, but there is no reason not to make the ring smaller.
    • Swans Commentary: How Kafka Became So Kafkaesque, by Michael Doliner - mdolin46 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.swans.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It is, in fact, a kind of martial law.^ It is, in fact, a kind of martial law.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 40
  • Believing in progress does not mean believing that any progress has yet been made.^ Believing in progress does not mean believing that any progress has yet been made.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .That is not the sort of belief that indicates real faith.^ That is not the sort of belief that indicates real faith.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 48
  • Man cannot live without a permanent trust in something indestructible in himself, though both the indestructible element and the trust may remain permanently hidden from him.^ Man cannot live without a permanent trust in something indestructible in himself, though both the indestructible element and the trust may remain permanently hidden from him.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Man cannot live without a permanent trust in something indestructible in himself, and at the same time that indestructible something as well as his trust in it may remain permanently concealed from him.''
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Humility provides everyone, even him who despairs in solitude, with the strongest relationship to his fellow man, and this immediately, though, of course, only in the case of complete and permanent humility.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .One of the ways in which this hiddenness can express itself is through faith in a personal god.
    • 50; Der Mensch kann nicht leben ohne ein dauerndes Vertrauen zu etwas Unzerstörbarem in sich, wobei sowohl das Unzerstörbare als auch das Vertrauen ihm dauernd verborgen bleiben können.^ "Man konnte nicht in Prag leben, ohne religiös zu leben."
      • CESNUR 1999 - Franz Kafka (Bauer) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cesnur.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ One of the ways in which this hiddenness can express itself is through faith in a personal god.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Der Mensch kann nicht leben ohne ein dauerndes Vertrauen zu etwas Unzerstörbarem in sich, wobei sowohl das Unzerstörbare als auch das Vertrauen ihm dauernd verborgen bleiben können.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Eine der Ausdrucksmöglichkeiten dieses Verborgen-Bleibens ist der Glaube an einen persönlichen Gott.
  • The mediation by the serpent was necessary: Evil can seduce man, but cannot become man.
    • 51
  • In the struggle between yourself and the world, second the world.
    • 52, Im Kampf zwischen Dir und der Welt, sekundiere der Welt.
    • Aphorism 52 in Unpublished Works 1916-1918
    • Variant translations:
      In the struggle between yourself and the world, back the world.
      In the struggle between yourself and the world, side with the world.^ Eine der Ausdrucksmöglichkeiten dieses Verborgen-Bleibens ist der Glaube an einen persönlichen Gott.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Aphorism 52 in Unpublished Works 1916-1918 Variant translations: In the struggle between yourself and the world, back the world.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The mediation by the serpent was necessary: Evil can seduce man, but cannot become man.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


      .In the fight between you and the world, back the world.
  • One must not cheat anyone, not even the world of its victory.^ Variant translation: One must not cheat anybody, not even the world of one's triumph.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "In the fight between you and the world, back the world" "If I abandon literature, I'll cease existing."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One must not cheat anyone, not even the world of its victory.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 53; Variant translation: One must not cheat anybody, not even the world of one's triumph.
  • There is nothing besides a spiritual world; what we call the world of the senses is the Evil in the spiritual world, and what we call Evil is only the necessity of a moment in our eternal evolution.
    One can disintegrate the world by means of very strong light.^ But language must be universal; one cannot escape the light of meaning.

    ^ 'There is nothing for me in the world.

    ^ There is nothing besides a spiritual world; what we call the world of the senses is the Evil in the spiritual world, and what we call Evil is only the necessity of a moment in our eternal evolution.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For weak eyes the world becomes solid, for still weaker eyes it seems to develop fists, for eyes weaker still it becomes shamefaced and smashes anyone who dares to gaze upon it.^ For weak eyes the world becomes solid, for still weaker eyes it seems to develop fists, for eyes weaker still it becomes shamefaced and smashes anyone who dares to gaze upon it.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The mother, who was still incapable of breathing properly, began to cough numbly with her hand held up over her mouth and a manic expression in her eyes.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ True, he had pains throughout his entire body, but it seemed to him that they were gradually becoming weaker and weaker and would finally go away completely.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 54
  • There are questions we could not get past if we were not set free from them by our very nature.^ There are questions we could not get past if we were not set free from them by our very nature.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "You can hold yourself back from the sufferings of the world, that is something you are free to do and it accords with your nature, but perhaps this very holding back is the one suffering you could avoid".
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The staff was extremely friendly, asked if we had any questions and was very knowledgeable about our selections.
    • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • 56
  • One tells as few lies as possible only by telling as few lies as possible, and not by having the least possible opportunity to do so.
    • 58
  • The fact that there is nothing but a spiritual world deprives us of hope and gives us certainty.^ 'There is nothing for me in the world.

    ^ One tells as few lies as possible only by telling as few lies as possible, and not by having the least possible opportunity to do so.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The fact that there is nothing but a spiritual world deprives us of hope and gives us certainty.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 62
  • Expulsion from Paradise is in its main aspect eternal: that is to say, although expulsion from Paradise is final, and life in the world unavoidable, the eternity of the process (or, expressed in temporal terms, the eternal repetition of the process) nevertheless makes it possible not only that we might remain in Paradise permanently, but that we may in fact be there permanently, no matter whether we know it here or not.^ There's no way to know for certain, although probably not.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Parables and Paradoxes (1946): The expulsion from Paradise is in its main significance eternal : Consequently the expulsion from Paradise is final, and life in this world irrevocable, but the eternal nature of the occurrence (or, temporally expressed, the eternal recapitulation of the occurrence) makes it nevertheless possible that not only could we live continuously in Paradise, but that we are continuously there in actual fact, no matter whether we know it here or not.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was no denying that anything was possible.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 65; a slight variant of this statement was later published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946):
      The expulsion from Paradise is in its main significance eternal:
      Consequently the expulsion from Paradise is final, and life in this world irrevocable, but the eternal nature of the occurrence (or, temporally expressed, the eternal recapitulation of the occurrence) makes it nevertheless possible that not only could we live continuously in Paradise, but that we are continuously there in actual fact, no matter whether we know it here or not.
  • What is gayer than believing in a household god?^ What is gayer than believing in a household god?
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Parables and Paradoxes (1946): The expulsion from Paradise is in its main significance eternal : Consequently the expulsion from Paradise is final, and life in this world irrevocable, but the eternal nature of the occurrence (or, temporally expressed, the eternal recapitulation of the occurrence) makes it nevertheless possible that not only could we live continuously in Paradise, but that we are continuously there in actual fact, no matter whether we know it here or not.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was no denying that anything was possible.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 68
  • Theoretically there is a perfect possibility of happiness: believing in the indestructible element in oneself and not striving towards it.
    • 69
  • The indestructible is one: it is each individual human being and, at the same time, it is common to all, hence the incomparably indivisible union that exists between human beings.
    • 71
  • If what was supposed to have been destroyed in Paradise was destructible, then it was not decisive; but if it was indestructible, then we are living in a false belief.^ If what was supposed to have been destroyed in Paradise was destructible, then it was not decisive; but if it was indestructible, then we are living in a false belief.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In humanity every individual has his place or at least the possibility of being destroyed in his own fashion.
    • Sample Chapter for Kafka, F.; Corngold, S., Greenberg, J., Wagner, B., eds.; Patton, E. and Hein, R., trans.: Franz Kafka: The Office Writings. 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC press.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But theres time for all that.
    • Franz Kafka: The Judgement (e-text) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 74
  • Test yourself on mankind.^ Test yourself on mankind.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It is something that makes the doubter doubt, the believer believe.^ It is something that makes the doubter doubt, the believer believe.
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • 75
  • Association with human beings lures one into self-observation.^ "Intercourse with human beings seduces one to self-contemplation."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Intercourse with human beings seduces one to self contemplation" Minze Eisner Kafka met her in Schelesen and advised her in her plans to run a farm.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For that reason alone we human beings ought to stand before one another as reverently, as reflectively, as lovingly, as we would before the entrance to Hell."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 77
  • Sensual love deceives one as to the nature of heavenly love; it could not do so alone, but since it unconsciously has the element of heavenly love within it, it can do so.^ Sensual love deceives one as to the nature of heavenly love; it could not do so alone, but since it unconsciously has the element of heavenly love within it, it can do so.
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The matter in question is one which could be decided only by K.s own judgment, and this judgment would have to be an evident one, a judgment based on a perception of his own loves and hates with respect to their intrinsic correctness or incorrectness.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "You can hold yourself back from the sufferings of the world, that is something you are free to do and it accords with your nature, but perhaps this very holding back is the one suffering you could avoid".
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 79
  • Truth is indivisible, hence it cannot recognize itself; anyone who wants to recognize it has to be a lie.^ Truth is indivisible, hence it cannot recognize itself; anyone who wants to recognize it has to be a lie.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Anyone who believes cannot experience miracles.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Kafka - Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.themodernword.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Logic is doubtless unshakable, but it cannot withstand a man who wants to go on living.

    • 80
  • Why do we complain about the Fall? .It is not on its account that we were expelled from Paradise, but on account of the Tree of Life, lest we might eat of it.^ It is not on its account that we were expelled from Paradise, but on account of the Tree of Life , lest we might eat of it.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We were not driven out of Paradise because of it, but because of the Tree of Life, that we might not eat of it.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Paradise" We are sinful not only because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge , but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life .
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 82, a slight variant of this was later published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946):
      Why do we lament over the fall of man?^ Parables and Paradoxes (1946): Why do we lament over the fall of man?
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Many of these statements in Kafka's notebooks were later published posthumously in Parables and Paradoxes (1946), and The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1954) as translated by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, Original German text The true way is along a rope that is not spanned high in the air, but only just above the ground.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ November 1917) a slight variant of this was published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946): If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without ascending it, the work would have been permitted.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .We were not driven out of Paradise because of it, but because of the Tree of Life, that we might not eat of it.
    • "Paradise"
  • The whole visible world is perhaps nothing more than than the rationalization of a man who wants to find peace for a moment.^ We were not driven out of Paradise because of it, but because of the Tree of Life, that we might not eat of it.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is more than a man of mystery -- he's metaphysical.
    • Powell's Books - Review-a-Day - The Tremendous World I Have Inside My Head: Franz Kafka: A Biographical Essay by Louis Begley, reviewed by New York Review of Books 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.powells.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The whole world is full of them, indeed the whole visible world is perhaps nothing more than the rationalisation of a man who wants to find peace for a moment.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    .An attempt to falsify the actuality of knowledge, to regard knowledge as a goal still to be reached.^ An attempt to falsify the actuality of knowledge, to regard knowledge as a goal still to be reached.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The whole visible world is perhaps nothing other than a motivation of man’s wish to rest for a moment — an attempt to falsify the fact of knowledge, to try to turn the knowledge into the goal.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I find out the boat's actually going to Finland, and I don't actually reach the U.S. until '27, but I still say "This is the place!
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Paradise"
  • We are sinful not only because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge, but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life.^ "Paradise" We are sinful not only because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge , but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life .
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Parables and Paradoxes (1946): We are sinful not merely because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge, but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We were not driven out of Paradise because of it, but because of the Tree of Life, that we might not eat of it.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The state in which we are is sinful, irrespective of guilt.^ The state in which we are is sinful, irrespective of guilt.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The state in which we find ourselves is sinful, quite independent of guilt.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 83, a slight variant of this was later published in Parables and Paradoxes (1946):
      We are sinful not merely because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge, but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life. The state in which we find ourselves is sinful, quite independent of guilt.^ The state in which we find ourselves is sinful, quite independent of guilt.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "Paradise" We are sinful not only because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge , but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life .
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Parables and Paradoxes (1946): We are sinful not merely because we have eaten of the Tree of Knowledge, but also because we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Life.
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • Also quoted in this form in The Parables of Peanuts (1968) by Robert L. Short, and Like a Dream, Like a Fantasy: The Zen Teachings and Translations of Nyogen (2005)
  • Evil is a radiation of the human consciousness in certain transitional positions. It is not actually the sensual world that is a mere appearance; what is so is the evil of it, which, admittedly, is what constitutes the sensual world in our eyes.^ It is not actually the sensual world that is a mere appearance; what is so is the evil of it, which, admittedly, is what constitutes the sensual world in our eyes.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Also quoted in this form in The Parables of Peanuts (1968) by Robert L. Short, and Like a Dream, Like a Fantasy: The Zen Teachings and Translations of Nyogen (2005) Evil is a radiation of the human consciousness in certain transitional positions.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is nothing besides a spiritual world; what we call the world of the senses is the Evil in the spiritual world, and what we call Evil is only the necessity of a moment in our eternal evolution.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Franz Kafka - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 85
  • The whole visible world is perhaps nothing other than a motivation of man’s wish to rest for a moment — an attempt to falsify the fact of knowledge, to try to turn the knowledge into the goal.^ "Paradise" The whole visible world is perhaps nothing more than than the rationalization of a man who wants to find peace for a moment.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ An attempt to falsify the actuality of knowledge, to regard knowledge as a goal still to be reached.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ THE OTHERS Turn back into the picture.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 86
  • A belief is like a guillotine, just as heavy, just as light.^ A belief is like a guillotine, just as heavy, just as light.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ F. Kafka: A belief is like a guillotine, just as heavy, just as light.

    ^ "A belief is like a guillotine just as heavy, just as light" "Many people prowl round Mount Sinai.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 87
  • Two possibilities: making oneself infinitely small or being so.^ In a brief annotation that Canetti considers could have been taken from a Taoist text, Kafka once hinted at the relevance of this fundamental concept: "Two possibilities: to make oneself infinitely small or to be [such].
    • CESNUR 1999 - Franz Kafka (Bauer) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cesnur.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Against the self-alienation to Power encoded in the gestalt of the Mighty and their devoted representatives, Kafka asserts the Taoistic inspired strategy of "making oneself infinitely small".
    • CESNUR 1999 - Franz Kafka (Bauer) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cesnur.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The second is perfection, that is to say, inactivity, the first is beginning, that is to say, action.^ The second is perfection, that is to say, inactivity, the first is beginning, that is to say, action.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The second one is perfection, therefore non-activity; the first [is] beginning, therefore action."
    • CESNUR 1999 - Franz Kafka (Bauer) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cesnur.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Murakami writes in many different points of view; he begins with first-person, then switches to third-person omnipresent, and sometimes even uses second-person narration.
    • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • 90
  • Towards the avoidance of a piece of verbal confusion: What is intended to be actively destroyed must first of all have been firmly grasped; what crumbles away crumbles away, but cannot be destroyed.^ As object for a science poetry is said to have a certain inherent obscurity since it evokes dimensions which cannot be grasped rationally; otherwise it would not be poetry at all.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 91
  • The first worship of idols was certainly fear of the things in the world, but, connected with this, fear of the necessity of the things, and, connected with this, fear of responsibility for the things.^ The first worship of idols was certainly fear of the things in the world, but, connected with this, fear of the necessity of the things, and, connected with this, fear of responsibility for the things.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .So tremendous did this responsibility appear that people did not even dare to impose it upon one single extra-human entity, for even the mediation of one being would not have sufficiently lightened human responsibility, intercourse with only one being would still have been all too deeply tainted with responsibility, and that is why each things was given the responsibility for itself, more indeed, these things were also given a degree of responsibility for man.^ So tremendous did this responsibility appear that people did not even dare to impose it upon one single extra-human entity, for even the mediation of one being would not have sufficiently lightened human responsibility, intercourse with only one being would still have been all too deeply tainted with responsibility, and that is why each things was given the responsibility for itself, more indeed, these things were also given a degree of responsibility for man.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Intercourse with human beings seduces one to self-contemplation."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She was the only one who did any work.
    • Swans Commentary: How Kafka Became So Kafkaesque, by Michael Doliner - mdolin46 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.swans.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 92
  • There can be knowledge of the diabolical, but no belief in it, for more of the diabolical than there is does not exist.^ KAFKA'S VOICE Naturally things cannot in reality fit together the way the evidence does in my letter -- life is more than a Chinese puzzle.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If she is not a talented singer and offers no major benefit to the other mice, there must be something more to Josephine’s position within the society.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I can no longer think about a more extensive organization of the processIm using all my powers to maintain what there is at present.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 99
  • We too must suffer all the suffering around us.^ We too must suffer all the suffering around us.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I imagine they all stand around him, his characters, woken by the coming end of their creator to assume his suffering.

    .We all have not one body, but we have one way of growing, and this leads us through all anguish, whether in this or in that form.^ "Life's splendor forever lies in wait about each one of us in all its fullness, but veiled from view, deep down, invisible, far off.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In particular, the way in which they all blew the smoke from their cigars out of their noses and mouths up into the air led one to conclude that they were very irritated.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He might still claim that the law is without authority or that it is an absurd and irrational one, but he would presumably be able to tell whether he had in fact behaved in a way forbidden by the law.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Just as the child develops through all the stages of life right into old age and to death (and fundamentally to the earlier stage the later one seems out of reach, in relation both to desire and to fear), so also do we develop (no less deeply bound up with mankind than with ourselves) through all the sufferings of this world.^ But old age has its own rightful demands.

    ^ This goes no further, all right?
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Just as the child develops through all the stages of life right into old age and to death (and fundamentally to the earlier stage the later one seems out of reach, in relation both to desire and to fear), so also do we develop (no less deeply bound up with mankind than with ourselves) through all the sufferings of this world.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .There is no room for justice in this context, but neither is there any room either for fear of suffering or for the interpretation of suffering as a merit.^ It was as if some huge force was compressing the Inscriber, so that there was no longer sufficient room left for this wheel.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Although there are many ways to read these stories, it’s impossible to come to any definite conclusions – and neither did Kafka, who resisted simplistic interpretations.

    ^ Concepts of justice apply only to those inside, but there is no reason not to make the ring smaller.
    • Swans Commentary: How Kafka Became So Kafkaesque, by Michael Doliner - mdolin46 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.swans.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 102
  • Humility provides everyone, even him who despairs in solitude, with the strongest relationship to his fellow man, and this immediately, though, of course, only in the case of complete and permanent humility.^ His trial, he believes, may even become a test-case and he goes about the court believing the other accused believe him to be one of the judges or magistrates.

    ^ The Hunger Artist of course is a story of a man who is a circus performer basically, and his act is to starve to death in front of an audience.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gregor needed to hear only the first word of the visitors greeting to recognize immediately who it was, the manager himself.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .It can do this because it is the true language of prayer, at once adoration and the firmest of unions.^ It can do this because it is the true language of prayer, at once adoration and the firmest of unions.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The relationship to one’s fellow man is the relationship of prayer, the relationship to oneself is the relationship of striving; it is from prayer that one draws the strength for one’s striving.^ 'Everyone strives to attain the law,' answers the man, 'How does it come about then, that in all these years, no-one has come seeking admittance but me?'
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 106
  • "It cannot be said that we are lacking in faith.^ "It cannot be said that we are lacking in faith.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Even the simple fact of our life is of a faith-value that can never be exhausted.” “You suggest there is some faith-value in this?^ Even the simple fact of our life is of a faith-value that can never be exhausted.” “You suggest there is some faith-value in this?
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jules: K? K: I can't imagine why you'd all just sit there and calmly lie right to our faces, even when you know we've caught you.
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You won't even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over.
    • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

    .One cannot not-live, after all.” “It is precisely in this ‘Cannot, after all’ that the mad strength of faith lies; it is in this negation that it takes on form.”
    There is no need for you to leave the house.
    ^ One cannot not-live, after all.” “It is precisely in this ‘Cannot, after all’ that the mad strength of faith lies; it is in this negation that it takes on form.” There is no need for you to leave the house.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You do not need to leave your room.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One link is all they need.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Stay at your table and listen.^ Stay at your table and listen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Remain sitting at your table and listen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Remain at your table and listen.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Don’t even listen, just wait.^ Do not even listen, simply wait; do not even wait, be quite still and solitary.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    Don’t even wait, be completely quiet and alone. .The world will offer itself to you to be unmasked; it can’t do otherwise; in raptures it will writhe before you.^ The world will freely offer itself to you, to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    • 109; Variant translations: It is not necessary that you leave the house. .Remain at your table and listen.^ Remain sitting at your table and listen.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      .Do not even listen, only wait.^ Do not even listen, simply wait; do not even wait, be quite still and solitary.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      .Do not even wait, be wholly still and alone.^ Do not even listen, simply wait; do not even wait, be quite still and solitary.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      .The world will present itself to you for its unmasking, it can do no other, in ecstasy it will writhe at your feet.^ The world will freely offer itself to you, to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A kind of 'reduction' whereby the novel no longer refers to a world outside of itself.

      ^ Some part of this story takes me to the other worlds, and I could imagine a place where no ages and no time.
      • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]


      .You do not need to leave your room.^ Eugene Gilfedder: You do not need to leave your room.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ You can leave a response , or trackback from your own site.
      • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Gregor”, said his father now from the room to his left, “the chief clerk has come round and wants to know why you didn’t leave on the early train.
      • Metamorphosis (by Franz Kafka) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.authorama.com [Source type: Original source]

      .Remain sitting at your table and listen.^ Remain sitting at your table and listen.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Sits at KATES table ) You spread marmalade on your eggs.
      • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ CUT: TABLE Bizzlebek sits listening to Kafka's tale of woe.
      • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

      .Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary.^ Do not even listen, simply wait; do not even wait, be quite still and solitary.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      .The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.^ The world will freely offer itself to you, to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ BURGEL It's my place to offer advice, not yours -- and by advising the Chief Clerk of your unpunctuality it's certainly not my situation that's compromised, if that's what you're implying.
      • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ It really seems to me that it does you no good when one meditates about you, your courage and health are failing."


      .You do not need to leave your room.^ Eugene Gilfedder: You do not need to leave your room.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ You can leave a response , or trackback from your own site.
      • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Gregor”, said his father now from the room to his left, “the chief clerk has come round and wants to know why you didn’t leave on the early train.
      • Metamorphosis (by Franz Kafka) 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.authorama.com [Source type: Original source]

      .Remain sitting at your table and listen.^ Remain sitting at your table and listen.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Sits at KATES table ) You spread marmalade on your eggs.
      • Carla Seaquist - Kate and Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.carlaseaquist.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ CUT: TABLE Bizzlebek sits listening to Kafka's tale of woe.
      • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

      .Do not even listen, simply wait.^ Do not even listen, simply wait; do not even wait, be quite still and solitary.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      .Do not even wait, be quiet still and solitary.^ Do not even listen, simply wait; do not even wait, be quite still and solitary.
      • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

      The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.

The Trial (1920)

Published as Der Prozess (1925) Full text online]
.
  • Someone must have traduced Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning. His landlady's cook, who always brought him his breakfast at eight o'clock, failed to appear on this occasion.^ Someone must have been telling lies about Josef K, for without having done anything wrong, he was arrested one fine morning.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Someone must have been telling lies about you, because one fine morning, you wake up to find yourself in a completely new village, a different country, and after remembering your unsettling dreams, you discover that behind it all has sat a modest little crow of a man."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Joseph K.s search for an authority who might help him bring his case to a successful conclusion is a journey through just such a maze.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    That had never happened before.
    • First lines, Ch. .1; variant translation: Somebody must have been telling lies about Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning.
  • This question of yours, Sir, about my being a house painter — or rather, not a question, you simply made a statement — is typical of the whole character of this trial that is being foisted on me.^ Hmm, and you answered my question about where Bucholz has been.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Then youll receive one without question.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Someone must have been telling lies about Josef K, for without having done anything wrong, he was arrested one fine morning.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    .You may object that it is not a trial at all; you are quite right, for it is only a trial if I recognize it as such.^ All right then, what do you really want?
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Are you all right?
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Posting is for noncommercial purposes only and you may not Post in any manner which does or is intended to promote or generate revenue for any business enterprise or commercial activity.
    • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    But for the moment I do recognize it, on grounds of compassion, as it were. .One can't regard it except with compassion, if one is to regard it at all.^ They all fell silent except one-nine-four-two, who insisted to see the Manager.
    • THE IRANIAN: Kafka's cockroach, Reza Ordoubadian 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.iranian.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For surely no one except Grete would ever trust themselves to enter a room in which Gregor ruled the empty walls all by himself.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .I do not say that your procedure is contemptible, but I should like to present that epithet to you for your private consumption.^ But that your son should have to tell you this!
    • The diaries of Franz Kafka, 1910-1923 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.metameat.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ CopperNicholas Says: November 1st, 2009 at 9:45 am I feel like you really put a lot of effort into this article.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ You should give only brief answerssomething like, Yes, Ive seen the execution or Yes, Ive heard the full explanation.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • Josef K. in Ch. 2; Variant translation: Your question, Mr. Examining Magistrate, as to whether I am a house-painter — although you did not ask a question at all, you made a statement — typifies exactly the kind of proceedings that are being instituted against me.
  • The right understanding of any matter and a misunderstanding of the same matter do not wholly exclude each other.
  • Logic may indeed be unshakeable, but it cannot withstand a man who is determined to live. Where was the judge he had never seen? Where was the High Court he had never reached? He raised his hands and spread out all his fingers. .But the hands of one of the men closed round his throat, just as the other drove the knife deep into his heart and turned it twice.^ THE OTHERS Turn back into the picture.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Just what was it that turned Nakata from a promising student into a dimwit?
    • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

    ^ At the doorway, holding a revolver loosely in one hand to discourage heroes, the Man in Black turns calmly to face the stunned restaurant.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. 10

Parables and Paradoxes (1946)

Many statements from this work are in the earlier section "Aphorisms" (1918)
.
  • The whole visible world is perhaps nothing more than than the rationalization of a man who wants to find peace for a moment.^ The whole world is full of them, indeed the whole visible world is perhaps nothing more than the rationalisation of a man who wants to find peace for a moment.
    • Encounter - 21/11/99: Franz Kafka 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They would be interested in the "ringleaders" and heads of the associations rather than people who listened and said nothing.
    • Franz Kafka and libertarian socialism | libcom.org 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC libcom.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With each new book that I read, I find myself wanting to like him more than I ever really do.
    • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

    .An attempt to falsify the actuality of knowledge, to regard knowledge as a goal still to be reached.^ An attempt to falsify the actuality of knowledge, to regard knowledge as a goal still to be reached.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The whole visible world is perhaps nothing other than a motivation of man’s wish to rest for a moment — an attempt to falsify the fact of knowledge, to try to turn the knowledge into the goal.
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franz Kafka - Wikiquote 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I find out the boat's actually going to Finland, and I don't actually reach the U.S. until '27, but I still say "This is the place!
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Paradise"
  • The Messiah will come only when he is no longer necessary; he will come only on the day after his arrival; he will come, not on the last day, but on the very last day.^ Behind Gregor the sound at this point was no longer like the voice of only a single father.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The doorkeeper gave the message of salvation to the man only when it could no longer help him.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the early days especially, there was no conversation which was not concerned with him in some way or other, even if only in secret.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • Variant translation: The Messiah will come only when he is no longer necessary; he will come only on the day after his arrival; he will come, not on the last day, but at the very last.

The Diaries of Franz Kafka 1910-1923 (1948)

Edited by Max Brod
.
  • * I can prove at any time that my education tried to make another person out of me than the one I became.^ "I can prove at any time that my education tried to make another person out of me than the one I became.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is for the harm, therefore, that my educators could have done me in accordance with their intentions that I reproach them; I demand from their hands the person I now am, and since they cannot give him to me, I make of my reproach and laughter a drumbeat sounding in the world beyond."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ At the same time, he didn’t really care to meet her again in person, preferring to carry out the entire relationship in words.

    .It is for the harm, therefore, that my educators could have done me in accordance with their intentions that I reproach them; I demand from their hands the person I now am, and since they cannot give him to me, I make of my reproach and laughter a drumbeat sounding in the world beyond.^ It is for the harm, therefore, that my educators could have done me in accordance with their intentions that I reproach them; I demand from their hands the person I now am, and since they cannot give him to me, I make of my reproach and laughter a drumbeat sounding in the world beyond."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His two friends had already been listening for a while with their hands quite still, and now they hopped smartly after him, as if afraid that Mr. Samsa could step into the hall ahead of them and disturb their reunion with their leader.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He only had to bring his hand near the Harrow for it to rise and sink several times, until it had reached the correct position to make room for him.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • (1910)
  • Life's splendor forever lies in wait about each one of us in all its fullness, but veiled from view, deep down, invisible, far off.^ "Life's splendor forever lies in wait about each one of us in all its fullness, but veiled from view, deep down, invisible, far off.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ At one point Hermann compared Löwy to a dog, but this wouldn’t stop Kafka – and after all, his father looked down upon all of his friends.

    ^ Such a resolution purports that the fundamental issue of all religion and of all life wisdom lies in the connected nature of life and death that hinders their mutual cancellation.
    • CESNUR 1999 - Franz Kafka (Bauer) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cesnur.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It is there, though, not hostile, not reluctant, not deaf.^ It is there, though, not hostile, not reluctant, not deaf.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .If you summon it by the right word, by its right name, it will come.^ If you summon it by the right word, by its right name, it will come.
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Im coming right away, said Gregor slowly and deliberately and didnt move, so as not to lose one word of the conversation.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ CHIEF CLERK In any case -- don't ask me why -- the word has come down you're to be promoted.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    • (18 October 1921)

The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1954)

.
  • The history of mankind is the instant between two strides taken by a traveler.
  • The thornbush is old obstacle in the road.^ ERNST Perhaps he's taken up with those traveling players you two were so fond of.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It must catch fire if you want to go further.
  • There was once a community of scoundrels, that is to say, they were not scoundrels, but ordinary people.
  • Anyone who believes cannot experience miracles.^ Once you go (and you must go at once), you will agree.
    • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Just givin’ the people what they want.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ But what you do say must be short and vague.
    • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    By day one does not see any stars. .Anyone who does miracles says: I cannot let go of the earth.
  • (21 November 1917) Variant translation: Anyone who believes cannot experience miracles.^ PrimusSucks Says: November 1st, 2009 at 8:10 am Can someone make Cody go away please?
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ After that, I was able to let it go a little...I'd like to give the author the benefit of the doubt and blame the translator/translation quality...but I'm skeptical.
    • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Anyone who cannot come to terms with his life while he is alive needs one hand to ward off a little his despair over his fate .
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    By day one cannot see any stars.
  • Religions get lost as people do.

Franz Kafka: A Biography (1960)

Quotes from Franz Kafka: A Biography (1960) by Max Brod (expanding on earlier editions of 1937 and 1947), as translated by G. Humphreys Roberts and Richard Winston ISBN 0306806703
  • What is meant by its nature for the highest and the best, spreads among the lowly people.^ Before the twentieth century, philosophers hoped to reveal the best way to achieve a good and meaningful life, which generally meant a life connected to nature and community.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    • p. 74

The Complete Stories (1971)

  • A man once said: Why such reluctance? .If you only followed the parables you yourselves would become parables and with that rid of all your daily cares.^ Only you would think of that.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ We suggest that you take some of the following actions which may help to clean your computer and which could prevent future installations of Malware.
    • Kafka Solo | SPIKE 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ We're here to make you famous, and all you care about is lawn care?
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]


    Another said: I bet that is also a parable.
    The first said: You have won.
    The second said: But unfortunately only in parable.
    .The first said: No, in reality: in parable you have lost.^ KAFKA No, but do you realize why?
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That was apparent really for the first time, now that he was no longer raised on his small limbs and nothing else distracted one from looking.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I'm at the point now where I think you've got to boot Lockheed," said DeKort, who no longer works for the company.
    • Deepwater DooDoo - If Franz Kafka built boats for the Coast Guard... 16 January 2010 20:11 UTC www.ostgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • "On Parables", translation by Willa and Edwin Muir
  • "Everything you say is boring and incomprehensible," she said, "but that alone doesn't make it true."^ But even if what you say is true.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ We are not obliged to accept everything he says as true.
    • Franz Kafka and libertarian socialism | libcom.org 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC libcom.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Everything you say is what I think aloud when I read the comment boards on the new guy’s and this guy’s stuff.
    • The Trials of Gladstone (as told by Franz Kafka) | Cracked.com 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.cracked.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
  • How much my life has changed, and yet how unchanged it has remained at bottom!^ This is my first Blackberry and my friend Paul couldn’t have said it better, “It’ll change your life.” This phone is absolutely amazing.

    .When I think back and recall the time when I was still a member of the canine community, sharing in all its preoccupations, a dog among dogs, I find on closer examination that from the very beginning I sensed some discrepancy, some little maladjustment, causing a slight feeling of discomfort which not even the most decorous public functions could eliminate; more, that sometimes, no, not sometimes, but very often, the mere look of some fellow dog of my own circle that I was fond of, the mere look of him, as if I had just caught it for the first time, would fill me with helpless embarrassment and fear, even with despair.^ Hideous faces looking back at him.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His frightening appearance would for the first time become useful for him.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I go off on tangents every now and then but usually find myself back in front of a wave at some point!
    • "Wave #3" Fine Art Print by kafka [416341-4] - RedBubble 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.redbubble.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
  • All knowledge, the totality of all questions and all answers, is contained in the dog.^ I love the value and quality and the staff is there to answer all kinds of questions!
    • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

    ^ To answer these questions we must, according to Brentano, discover the origin of the conceptgood anbetter, for these, like all concepts, must originate from insights, i.e., intuitions, whose objects are concrete.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .If one could but realize this knowledge, if one could but bring it into the light of day, if we dogs would but own that we know infinitely more than we admit to ourselves!^ What more could one want?
    • Kafka Wine Co - Lakeview - Chicago, IL 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Accordingly, if virtuous conduct is to be conceived as conduct informed by a knowledge of good and evil then a person cannot be taught to behave virtuously any more than she can be taught to know the truth of a judgment.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In order to know the correctness of a blind emotion it would be necessary that the emotion be perceived to agree with one which is evident to, i.e., internally perceived by, the person himself as correct.
    • �Acquired Innocence: Franz Kafka and the Prague Brentanists� 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC lamar.colostate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Investigations of a Dog"
  • Ours is a lost generation, it may be, but it is more blameless than those earlier generations.^ "Ours is a lost generation, it may be, but it is more blameless than those earlier generations".
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "I do not mean that earlier generations were essentially better than ours, but only younger."
    • Franz Kafka Biography 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.kafka-franz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now they wanted to rent a smaller and cheaper apartment but better situated and generally more practical than the present one, which Gregor had chosen.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Investigations of a Dog"
  • So long as you have food in your mouth, you have solved all questions for the time being.^ Often he lay there all night long, not sleeping at all, just scratching on the leather for hours at a time.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Originally I intended to mention all this to you privately, but since you are letting me waste my time here uselessly, I dont know why the matter shouldnt come to the attention of your parents as well.
    • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ K: Well, we figured as long as we were mailing copies of your notebooks to all the publishers, why stop there?
    • Where Threads Come Loose: Jules and K in The Lost Kafka Notebooks 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.wherethreadscomeloose.com [Source type: Original source]

    • "Investigations of a Dog"
  • "You asking me the way?" "Yes," I said, "since I can't find it myself." "Give it up! Give it up!" said he, and turned with a sudden jerk, like someone who wants to be alone with his laughter.
.Variant translation: The Policeman said to me, "You want to know the way?^ Dont you want to be on your way?
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ I already want to read it again - I think some parts of it will be even better when you know what comes...
  • Kafka on the Shore (Paperback) by Haruki Murakami - Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: General]

^ Yes, I have expected that, said his father, I always warned you of that, but you women dont want to listen.
  • Kafka, Metamorphosis (e-text) 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

Give up! Just give up!" .And he turned away like a man that wants to be alone with his laughter.^ The Condemned Man turned away at once.
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ The Traveller wanted to turn his face away from the Officer and looked aimlessly around him.
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ The latter was even leaning out away from the Harrow, without paying any attention to it and wanted merely to find out what was happening to the Condemned Man.
  • New Page 2 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

Quotes about Kafka

.
  • The only way Kafka could envisage of creating his in every respect impossible writing possible was to demarcate the area of impossibility by making a language without a particular color, without a local tone, without qualities, as it were.^ An only child for six years, Kafka’s sisters Elli, Valli, and Ottla were born in 1889, 1890, and 1892, respectively.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many biographers believe Kafka “created” Felice during this period; not being near her he created a mental image Felice could never equal.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is possible had Kafka lived a full life his writings might have evolved, but The Castle leads me to wonder if he had stagnated as a writer.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Marthe Robert, As Lonely as Kafka (1953)
  • He is interested in the feelings of the squash ball, and of the champagne bottle that launches the ship. .In a football match his sympathy is not with either of the teams but with the ball, or, in a match ending nil-nil, with the hunger of the goalmouth.^ Few Big Ten players proved more valuable to their teams this fall than Kafka, who ended the season playing his best football.
    • Mike Kafka - College Football Nation Blog - ESPN 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC espn.go.com [Source type: General]

    • Alan Bennett Writing Home p. .336
  • Kafka described with wonderful imaginative power the future concentration camps, the future instability of the law, the future absolutism of the state Apparat.^ Kafka is wondering why -- when his concentration is interrupted.
    • "Kafka", by Lem Dobbs 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.dailyscript.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All three of Kafka’s sisters died in concentration camps, as did Milena Jesenská-Polak.

    ^ Kafka’s three sisters also died in Nazi concentration camps.
    • Existential Primer: Franz Kafka 6 February 2010 11:52 UTC www.tameri.com [Source type: Original source]

External links

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Simple English

[[File:|thumb|Franz Kafka in 1906.]] Franz Kafka (born Prague July 3, 1883 – died near Vienna June 3, 1924) was a famous Czech-born, German-speaking writer. His best known works are The Metamorphosis and the novels The Trial and The Castle. Not much of his work was published during his lifetime. He asked his friend to make sure that all his writings which were not published, including his three novels, would be destroyed when he died. Fortunately his friend did not destroy them, and they were published after Kafka’s death.

Kafka’s writings are about the frightening world around him which he often did not understand. A typical situation in his books might be someone who has gone somewhere to take a message, but he does not know what the message is or who it is for. The people he meets confuse him even more. Sometimes, when people find themselves in strange, nightmarish situations like this, they are described as Kafkaesque situations.

His life

Kafka was born into a middle-class Jewish family. His father was a merchant. He was very strict and unkind to his family. Kafka’s stories often have fathers who are very brutal and unkind. Kafka spent most of his life living at home. He never married or became free from his parents. He felt that he had no will of his own. He wrote about people who are dominated by some mysterious power. He found it difficult to make friends, he hated his job and everyone around him. He often felt that he belonged nowhere. He was German-speaking but lived in a Czech-speaking country (Bohemia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, now part of the Czech Republic). He was different because he was Jewish, but he did not become part of the Jewish community either. He said that he was a socialist and an atheist, but although he was interested in politics he never took part in political activity. He supported Czechs who wanted to rule their own country and let their culture flourish, but he was not one of them because he himself was brought up in a German culture.

It was while he was studying law at the University of Prague that he met Max Brod who was to become his friend. Brod was a writer himself, and he later wrote a biography of Kafka.

After his studies Kafka took a job in an insurance company. He was good at his job although he hated it. He found the office work boring, and he spent his nights writing. In 1917 he got tuberculosis. Gradually he became more and more ill. He had to retire in 1922. He spent some time in a sanitorium. He died in 1924.

His works

Several publishers realized how good Kafka’s writings were and asked him whether they could publish his works. Kafka reluctantly let a few things be published. One of these works was a story called Metamorphosis (German: Die Verwandlung). It is about a man called Gregor Samsa (the name “Samsa” means "loner" or "lonely"). Gregor wakes up one morning to find he has changed into a horrible bug. His family becomes ashamed of him and they stop looking after him so that he slowly dies. Stories like these are a kind of fable. They are full of strange and frightening situations.

His novel Amerika (published in 1927 is about a man who arrives in America looking for a father figure to protect him. He is quiet and timid and other people use him. In the end he dies.

In The Trial (German: Der Prozess, published in 1925), a man who works in a bank is arrested and taken to court. He is never told what he has done wrong. Even the priest tells him that if he asks what he has done wrong it proves that he is guilty. Finally he is executed.

In The Castle (German: Das Schloss) a man who is simply called “K” (the first letter of “Kafka”) arrives at a castle saying that he has been given a job there, but the people there say they have not been told about his appointment. Kafka never finished the novel, but Max Brod says that Kafka was going to end it with K receiving permission to stay at the castle just as he was dying. The German word “Schloss” has two meanings: “castle” and “lock”. K becomes locked (trapped) in this strange situation.

At the time of his death only a few people understood Kafka’s writings. We are lucky that Max Brod saved all the unpublished books which would otherwise have been lost. Kafka is now thought of as one of the most important writers of the 20th century. His works had a lot of influence on German literature.

Other websites

mrj:Кафка, Франц

rue:Франц Кафка


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 24, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Franz Kafka, which are similar to those in the above article.








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