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The Free World is a Cold War-era term often used to describe countries not under the communist rule of the Soviet Union, its Eastern European allies, the People's Republic of China and other communist nations which restricted personal freedoms. The term often referred to countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Israel and Western Europe. In addition, the term sometimes was used as a spin to include anti-communist countries that were not free or democratic, including Spain under Franco, Greece under the Junta, Chile under Pinochet, and Taiwan under Chiang Kai-Shek (see also "Free China").

Because of the United States' prominent role in the Cold War, the president of the United States was often dubbed the "Leader of the Free World". The term implies that the United States president, as leader of the principal democratic superpower, was, by extension, the leader of the world's all democratic nations. Although it had a Cold War origin, it is still sometimes used to describe the United States president today.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ "It's time". The Economist. 2008-10-30. http://www.economist.com/world/unitedstates/displayStory.cfm?story_id=12516666&source=features_box_main. Retrieved 2008-11-08. "America should take a chance and make Barack Obama the next leader of the free world"  

The Free World is a Cold War-era term often used to describe states not under the rule of the Soviet Union, its Eastern European allies, the People's Republic of China and other communist nations which restricted personal freedoms. The term often referred to states such as the United States, Canada, and Western European states such as the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany (all members of NATO). In addition, it also sometimes included anti-communist states of the British Commonwealth, Japan, Israel, and undemocratic anti-communist states such as Spain under Francisco Franco, Greece under the military junta between 1967-1974, Chile under Pinochet, Brazil under military rule, and Taiwan under Chiang Kai-Shek (see also "Free China").

Because of the United States' prominent role in the Cold War, the President of the United States was often dubbed the "Leader of the Free World". The term implies that the U.S. President, as leader of the principal democratic superpower, was, by extension, the leader of all the world's democratic states. Although it had a Cold War origin, it is still sometimes used to describe the U.S. President today.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ "It's time". The Economist. 2008-10-30. http://www.economist.com/world/unitedstates/displayStory.cfm?story_id=12516666&source=features_box_main. Retrieved 2008-11-08. "America should take a chance and make Barack Obama the next leader of the free world" 

Simple English

The Free World is a term that was used during the era of the Cold War. It was often used by non-communist nations to describe themselves. It was used to describe the greater personal freedom that the people of non-communist countries (such as the United States and Western Europe) had compared to the Soviet Union and its East European allies.

On the other hand, many of the non-communist countries that were allied with the "Free World" during the Cold War repressed people and sometimes had dictators as their leaders. This included countries in South America, Asia and Africa.

The President of the United States was often called the "leader of the Free World". This was very common especially in the United States itself. The President of the U.S. is sometimes still called this.

Neil Young sang a song called "(Keep on) Rockin' in the Free World".








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