French Community of Belgium: Wikis

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French Community
Communauté française
—  Community of Belgium  —

Flag
Country Belgium
Established 1993
Capital Brussels
Government
 - Minister-President Rudy Demotte
Celebration Day 3rd Sunday of September
Language French
Website www.cfwb.be

The French Community of Belgium (French: Communauté française de Belgique, Dutch: Franse Gemeenschap van België, German: Französische Gemeinschaft Belgiens) is one of the three official communities in Belgium along with the Flemish Community and the German speaking Community. Although its name could suggest that it is a community of French citizens in Belgium, it is not. The French Community of Belgium is rather not a group of people or inhabitants, but an official institution which refers to French-speaking Belgian citizens. As such, it is sometimes called the French-speaking Community of Belgium. The French Community of Belgium has its own parliament, government, and administration. Its official flag is also the official flag of Wallonia where 80% of its citizens live.

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Alternative names

The names Communauté Wallonie-Bruxelles and Communauté française Wallonie-Bruxelles (or purely and simply Wallonie-Bruxelles, Wallonia-Brusssels) are generally used to refer to institutions of the French Community of Belgium [1]or more broadly to institutions which are common to the French Community of Belgium, the Walloon Region and the Commission communautaire française (COCOF, a French-speaking institution of the Brussels-Capital Region) [2]. These two names are not mentioned in the Belgian constitution, and only in a few official legal texts, such as the "Arrêté du Gouvernement de la Communauté française fixant le code de qualité et de l'accueil" of 17 December 2003, mentioning the name "Communauté Wallonie-Bruxelles", and the "Arrêté du Gouvernement de la Communauté française approuvant le programme quinquennal de promotion de la santé 2004-2008 of 30 April 2004, mentioning the name "Communauté française Wallonie-Bruxelles".

These names are contested by some Flemings, who feel that they may produce confusion about the differences between regional and community institutions. Some people may mistakenly interpret these names to refer to the common institutions of the Walloon Region, the Brussels-Capital Region and the COCOF, whereas they in fact only refer to the institution of the "French Community of Belgium". But the name Wallonia-Brussels [2] is more representative of the reality of Brussels, which has a large majority of Francophones, and of Wallonia, an almost only French-speaking Region, and also of the links between these two Regions. The two Presidents of these two Regions proposed Wallonia and Brussels would be a Federation (because of the common language and the common interests). On the official Website, there is sometimes a combination of news concerning both the powers of the Community and of Wallonia [3]

Comparison with "Flanders"

Another known confusion sometimes arises from the term 'Flanders' which can refer to two different political institutions and concepts, being the Flemish Region and the Flemish Community. 'Flanders', though not named in the Belgian constitution either, is more widely used in official publications, because the region has passed its constitutional competencies towards the community – whereas the Walloon Region and the French Community of Belgium remain separate. On the other hand, that name 'Flanders' does not create any "exclusion" towards the other linguistic group in the Brussels-Capital Region, being the French-speakers (exclusion or denial considered by some Flemings as being implicated by the name of Communauté Wallonie-Bruxelles).

List of Ministers-President of the French Community

Philippe Moureaux (1st time) 22 December 1981 - 9 December 1985 PS
Philippe Monfils 9 December 1985 - 2 February 1988 PRL
Philippe Moureaux (2nd time) 2 February - 9 May 1988 PS
Valmy Féaux 17 May 1988 - 7 January 1992 PS
Bernard Anselme 7 January 1992 - 4 May 1993 PS
Laurette Onkelinx 4 May 1993 - 13 July 1999 PS
Hervé Hasquin 13 July 1999 - 19 July 2004 PRL
Marie Arena 19 July 2004 - 20 March 2008 PS
Rudi Demotte 20 March 2008 - incumbent PS

See also

Notes

External links


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