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Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning

Theatrical poster
Directed by Danny Steinmann
Produced by Frank Mancuso Jr. (executive producer)
Timothy Silver
Written by Martin Kitrosser & David Cohen (story)
Martin Kitrosser & David Cohen and Danny Steinmann (screenplay)
Victor Miller (characters)
Starring John Shepherd
Melanie Kinnaman
Shavar Ross
Music by Harry Manfredini
Cinematography Stephen L. Posey
Editing by Bruce Green
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date(s) March 22, 1985
Running time 92 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $2,200,000
Gross revenue $21,900,000 (domestically)
Preceded by Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter
Followed by Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning is a 1985 slasher film. It was released on March 22, 1985. It is the fifth film in the Friday the 13th film series. Despite the previous film claiming to be the "final chapter," this installment set out to live up to its title by being a "new beginning" for the franchise. However, these plans fell through when the film was greeted with backlash from fans who felt deceived and betrayed by the film's twist ending.

Contents

Plot

After four years of being shuffled around various mental institutions, 16 years old Tommy Jarvis has now been placed in the Pinehurst halfway house, one that is unique because it runs off an honor system by Dr.Matt Letter. It is not made clear what happened to Tommy's sister, Trish, following the events of the previous film, but it's presumed she has since died. Tommy is shown around by Pam Roberts, the supervisor of the house, to his room where he meets Reggie, a young boy whose grandfather, George, cooks at the house.

Shortly after Tommy's arrival, one of the patients, Vic, attacks and kills another patient named Joey with an axe and is arrested. Paramedics and sheriff officers arrive. As the paramedics work to "clean up the mess," jokes are made by one of the paramedics about the murder, which apparently angers the other paramedic. That night, two teens, Pete and Vinnie, down the road are killed after their car stalls out. Billy, a worker at the halfway house, is murdered while waiting for his girlfriend, Lana, to finish work; Lana is killed shortly afterward.

The following day, patients Eddie and Tina run off into the woods to have sex and are killed. Pam then takes Reggie to see his brother, Demon. During this visit, Tommy gets into a fight with Junior, the mentally challenged son of a local woman, Ethel, and runs off. Shortly after Reggie and Pam leave, Anita is killed when her throat is slit and Demon is speared. Junior goes home crying, and while recklessly riding his motorcycle around the yard, is beheaded. The killer then murders Ethel by chopping her through a window with a meat cleaver, leaving her face-down in a pot of stew.

Soon, Pam and Reggie return, and Pam sends Reggie off to bed, then leaves to look for Matt and George, who both had gone missing earlier while searching for Tina and Eddie. While remaining patients Jake and Robin are watching a movie, Jake tries to tell Robin that he likes her but gets nowhere; he heads upstairs and is killed with a meat cleaver to the face. Shortly after, Robin heads upstairs to go to bed and is stabbed from underneath the bed, very shortly after discovering Jake's corpse lying next to her. Violet, who couldn't hear anything because of her blaring music while she is dancing, is choked and stabbed in the stomach. Reggie wakes up and begins to try and determine if anyone is in the house; instead, he finds a stack of bodies. Pam comes back and hears Reggie screaming. Pam then sees Jake, Robin, and Violet's dead bodies.

Pam and Reggie soon confront what appears to be Jason Voorhees, back from the dead. Along the way, Pam finds Matt nailed to a tree by a railroad spike through his forehead, and George, whose eyes are gouged out. Jason chases the survivors into the upper level of the barn. Just as he is about to find them, Tommy comes in and starts having flashbacks; unfortunately, he is slashed across his abdomen by Jason. Jason then turns his attention back to finding the survivors. Just as he is about to kill them, Tommy recovers and knocks Jason out the upper level of the barn; he lands on a piece of farm equipment covered in steel spikes. As the survivors look down at the body (with the hockey mask knocked off), they realize that the killer is not really Jason, but actually Roy Burns, whom the Sheriff describes as a loner. He was the paramedic who arrived on the scene to see his son Joey hacked to pieces. Roy had been using Jason's M.O. and identity to avenge the death of his son. It is also revealed that Roy ran off after his wife died giving birth to their son. The final scene of the movie takes place in the hospital with Pam visiting Tommy as he recuperates.

Tommy appears to be having delusions of Jason, and attacks Pam. Tommy then suddenly wakes up in his hospital bed, the previous attack having been a dream. He then walks to a dresser in the room and pulls out Roy's hockey mask. Pam then walks into Tommy's room to find Tommy gone, with the window smashed open, making it appear as though Tommy has run away. However, as the door closes behind Pam, Tommy is revealed, wearing the hockey mask, preparing to attack Pam, once again leaving the impression that Tommy will become a killer like Jason.

Cast

Box office

The film opened in 1,759 theaters taking in $8 million its opening weekend. Domestically, the film has grossed $21.9 million.

Cuts

Minor cuts were made to the film in order to avoid an "X" rating:

  • Some of the waitress twitching on the ground after she's axed in the head was edited out.
  • The sex scene was heavily cut due to explicit nudity, reducing it to the far shorter version now seen.

References

External links

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