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Friday the 13th Part II

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Steve Miner
Produced by Steve Miner
Written by Ron Kurz
Phil Scuderi
Starring Amy Steel
John Furey
Adrienne King
Betsy Palmer
Music by Harry Manfredini
Cinematography Peter Stein
Editing by Susan E. Cunningham
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date(s) May 1, 1981
Running time 87 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1,250,000
Gross revenue $21,722,776
Preceded by Friday the 13th
Followed by Friday the 13th Part III

Friday the 13th Part II is a 1981 American slasher film directed by Steve Miner. A sequel to Friday the 13th (1980), it is the second film in the Friday the 13th film series. It was a moderate box-office hit, opening on May 1, 1981, in first place.

Contents

Plot

The film opens with a prologue, concluding that Alice Hardy, the only survivor of the previous film, was attacked and killed by a stranger in her own home, two months after the conclusion of the first film.

Five years later, a group of young adults have come to Crystal Lake to attend a counselor training center that has been set up near the now-condemned Camp Crystal Lake. While some counselors are in town on their way to the facility, Crazy Ralph appears and tells the counselors to turn back, as the young counselors five years ago did not heed his warning. Paul Holt, the leader of the group, explains how camp counseling is a serious job, and that the main danger in the area is bears. That night, around a campfire, Paul tells the people about how Jason Voorhees drowned in the same lake which their training area also bounds, how his mother was found to be the infamous murderer of "Camp Blood," that Alice survived only to disappear shortly thereafter and that some of the local residents believe Jason is still alive and viciously protects the area around Crystal Lake. When the counselors seem into the story, they are shocked by a man with a spear, but it only turns out to be Ted in a monster mask and Paul claims that Jason is dead.

While Paul and his assistant, Ginny Field, are seen making out, Crazy Ralph is standing by a window, and is suddenly killed by a prowler using a garotte. The next day, Two of the counselors, Sandra and Jeff, sneak away to Camp Crystal Lake, which is now in disrepair. As they find a dead animal that they assume is Terry's dog, they are startled by a police officer who catches them trespassing. The cop returns the two counselors to camp, where Paul only recommends a light punishment. However, when driving, the officer sees a masked man dart out in front of his squad car, running in the direction of the off-limits Camp Crystal Lake. The cop chases after the masked man to arrest him as well, only to lose him and go into an old run down cabin. The officer then sees a horrifying sight. It is not shown to the viewer as the prowler who killed Crazy Ralph also murders the officer from behind with a hammer claw.

After getting to know one another and participating in some training exercises (which consist of dancing, jogging through the woods, swimming and a cookout), the majority of the trainees leave the campsite to party in town. The six counselors remaining, which consists of Vickie, Mark, Sandra, Jeff, Terry, and Scott are soon stalked and murdered one by one.

Terry goes for a skinny dip and Scott steals her clothes only to be caught by an animal trap while running from her. She takes her clothes back and promises to cut Scott down. As Terry goes into her cabin to retrieve her knife, Scott has his throat slit by the prowler. When Terry returns, she sees that Scott is dead and attempts to flee, but she too is killed by the prowler.

Back at the cabin, Sandra and Jeff go upstairs while Vickie goes to her cabin to freshen up. Mark waits for her to return but eventually goes outside in the storm to investigate, where the prowler hits him in the face with a machete, killing him and sending his body and wheelchair down the outside steps. The prowler enters the cabin and goes upstairs, taking the spear left by one of the counselors earlier. He enters the room where Sandra and Jeff are on the bed and impales them both before they realize he is there. Vickie returns and finds the prowler in Sandra and Jeff's room, along with their corpses. She is stabbed in the leg before the prowler plunges the knife in her chest.

Eventually Ginny and Paul return to the camp, and at the same time the killer is dragging the slain bodies of Sandra, Jeff and Vickie down the stairs. Ginny and Paul discover the lights are not working in the main cabin and sheets on an upstairs bed appear to be covered in blood. Paul is attacked by a figure whose head is covered with a burlap sack as Ginny screams and runs. On the way she discovers the corpse of Crazy Ralph and jumps out of the nearby window.

After a lengthy chase, Ginny stumbles upon the run-down cabin and enters. In the back room, she discovers a makeshift altar holding the severed head of Pamela Voorhees. Littered around the altar are several bodies of the recently slain victims as well as the rotten corpse of Alice. The killer is identified as Jason Voorhees, who has survived his drowning as a boy and has been living in the woods as a hermit all of his life. Ginny dons Mrs. Voorhees' sweater and deceives Jason into believing that she is his mother (although Jason wises up when he sees his mother's severed head). As Paul appears and wrestles with Jason, Ginny slams a machete through Jason's shoulder. Paul and Ginny retreat back to their cabin believing Jason is dead. Terry's pet dog, Muffin, comes to the door and as Ginny calls to Muffin to come, an unmasked Jason leaps through the window and begins to pull Ginny out. Ginny wakes up while being placed in an ambulance saying "Paul, Paul, where's Paul?" It is unknown what Paul's fate was.

Cast

Production

Steve Daskawisz was rushed to the emergency room when Amy Steel hit the machete on his middle finger. Steel explained about the dreaded situation, "The timing was wrong, and he didn't turn his pick axe properly, and the machete hit his finger." Daskawisz received 13 stitches on his middle finger. Finally, Daskawisz had a piece of rubber on his stitched finger, and him and Steel went to do the scene all over again. While Daskawisz was wearing the burlap sack, part of the sack was flapping at his eye so, the crew used tape inside the eye area to prevent it from flapping. In between takes when Daskawisz removed the sack, he received burns around his eye from the tape from wearing the sack for hours.

The final scene had to be shot at least twice because Warrington Gillette could not do his own stunts. As he could not do the run and crash through the window, the crew had to build a hoist to simulate Jason ramming through the window.

The film's ending has been a source of confusion for fans. Writer Ron Kurz has stated that Jason's window jump was intended to be set in reality and that Paul was killed offscreen.[1] However the beginning of Part 3 reused footage from the end of Part 2 but instead of showing Jason jumping though the window to attack Ginny, we are shown new footage of Jason pulling the machete out of this shoulder and crawling away as Ginny and Paul leave him for dead in the shack. Thus the scene of Jason's window jump was apparently retconed into a dream. Rumors sparked that John Furey left before the film wrapped as his character does not appear in the end. In truth, his character was not intended to have appeared. In an unused ending, after Ginny questions where Paul is, the scene switches to Mrs. Voorhees' head, which then opens its eyes and she's smiling, indicating that Jason had killed Paul.

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Development

Following the success of Friday the 13th in 1980, Paramount Pictures began plans to make a sequel. First acquiring the worldwide distribution rights, Frank Mancuso, Sr. stated, "We wanted it to be an event, where teenagers would flock to the theaters on that Friday night to see the latest episode." The initial ideas for a sequel involved the Friday the 13th title being used for a series of films, released once a year, that would not have direct continuity with each other, but be a separate "scary movie" of their own right. Phil Scuderi—one of three owners of Esquire Theaters, along with Steve Minasian and Bob Barsamian, who produced the original film—insisted that the sequel have Jason Voorhees, Pamela's son, even though his appearance in the original film was only meant to be a joke. Steve Miner, associate producer on the first film, believed in the idea and would go on to direct the first two sequels, after Cunningham opted not to return to the director's chair. Miner would use many of the same crew members from the first film while working on the sequels.[1]

Reception

Like the first film, Friday the 13th Part 2 received great commercial success but was derided by critics.

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave Friday the 13th Part 2 half of one star out of 4, stating: "This movie is a cross between the Mad Slasher and Dead Teenager genres; about eight infinity multiplied by infinity and etc. a second feature a mad killer going berserk, and they're all about as bad as this one."[2].

Based on 31 reviews collected by Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an overall approval rating from critics of 35%, with an average score of 4.5/10.

Other media

  • A novelization based on the screenplay of Ron Kurz was published in 1988: Hawke, Simon, Friday the 13th Part II: A Novel, New American Library, New York, 1988, ISBN 0-451-15337-5

References

  1. ^ a b Peter Brack (2006-10-11). Crystal Lake Memories. United Kingdom: Titan Books. pp. 50–52. ISBN 1845763432. 
  2. ^ "Friday the 13th, Part 2". Rogerebert.suntimes.com. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19810101/REVIEWS/101010331/1023. Retrieved 2008-06-16. 

External links


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