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Friedrich Nietzsche
Full name Friedrich Nietzsche
Born October 15, 1844
Röcken bei Lützen, Prussia
Died August 25, 1900 (aged 55)
Weimar, Saxony, German Empire
Era 19th century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Weimar Classicism; precursor to Continental philosophy, existentialism, Individualism, postmodernism, poststructuralism
Main interests aesthetics, ethics, ontology, philosophy of history, psychology, value-theory
Notable ideas Apollonian and Dionysian, death of God, eternal recurrence, herd-instinct, master-slave morality, Übermensch, perspectivism, will to power, ressentiment, der letzte Mensch
Signature
.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (German pronunciation: [ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈvɪlhεlm ˈniːtsʃə]) was a 19th-century German philosopher and classical philologist.^ Ritschl , Friedrich Wilhelm, 1806-1876, famous philologist, Professor at Bonn and Leipzig, whose pupil Nietzsche was at the latter university.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ THIS volume of Friedrich Nietzsche's private correspondence consists of a selection from the five-volume edition published in Germany between the years 1900-1909.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, using a distinctive German-language style and displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and aphorism.
Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. His style and radical questioning of the value and objectivity of truth have resulted in much commentary and interpretation, mostly in the continental tradition. His key ideas include the death of God, perspectivism, the Übermensch, the eternal recurrence, and the will to power.
Nietzsche began his career as a classical philologist before turning to philosophy. .At the age of 24 he was appointed to the Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel (the youngest individual to have held this position),[1] but resigned in 1879 due to health problems which would plague him for most of his life.^ My body (and my philosophy, too, for that matter), feels the cold to be its appointed preservative element—that sounds paradoxical and negative, but it is the most thoroughly demonstrated fact of my life.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ As far as my health is concerned, things are not so good as I really supposed they would be when I effected the complete change in my mode of life here.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I heard incidentally from him, how even in the University of Tubingen, where I pass for the most negative of spirits, my works are eagerly devoured in secret.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

In 1889 he went insane, living out his remaining years in the care of his mother and sister until his death in 1900.

Contents

Life

Youth (1844–69)

Born on October 15, 1844, Nietzsche grew up in the small town of Röcken, near Leipzig, in the Prussian Province of Saxony. He was named after King Frederick William IV of Prussia, who turned 49 on the day of Nietzsche's birth. .(Nietzsche later dropped his given middle name, "Wilhelm".)[2] Nietzsche's parents, Carl Ludwig Nietzsche (1813–1849), a Lutheran pastor and former teacher, and Franziska Oehler (1826–1897), married in 1843, the year before their son's birth, and had two other children: a daughter, Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche, born in 1846, and a second son, Ludwig Joseph, born in 1848. Nietzsche's father died from a brain ailment in 1849; his younger brother died in 1850. The family then moved to Naumburg, where they lived with Nietzsche's paternal grandmother and his father's two unmarried sisters.^ It is often a solace to me to exercise my imagination anticipating these later years of your life, and I often think I may one day be of service to you in your sons.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Krug , Gustav, one of the earliest intimates of Nietzsche, a member of a distinguished Naumburg family.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They bear the title E. Rohde on The Birth of Tragedy and include your two essays.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

After the death of Nietzsche's grandmother in 1856, the family moved into their own house.
Nietzsche, 1861
.Nietzsche attended a boys' school and then later a private school, where he became friends with Gustav Krug and Wilhelm Pinder, both of whom came from very respected families.^ Krug , Gustav, one of the earliest intimates of Nietzsche, a member of a distinguished Naumburg family.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Then came the recitation of original poems written by Upper School boys about various incidents in Schiller's life.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

In 1854, he began to attend the Domgymnasium in Naumburg, but after he showed particular talents in music and language, the internationally-recognised Schulpforta admitted him as a pupil, and there he continued his studies from 1858 to 1864. Here he became friends with Paul Deussen and Carl von Gersdorff. .He also found time to work on poems and musical compositions.^ He also found time to work on poems and musical compositions.
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  • Friedrich Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nietzsche features not only in a lot of critical works but can also be found in various other media types ranging from Ps2 games to movies and music.....
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

^ In this text, Janz expresses that it is now the right time to evaluate Nietzsche's compositions as to their importance: namely absolutely, as musical works, and relatively, in their position in the essence and work of Nietzsche.
  • Nietzsche and Music 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC www.virtusens.de [Source type: General]

.At Schulpforta, Nietzsche received an important introduction to literature, particularly that of the ancient Greeks and Romans, and for the first time experienced a distance from his family life in a small-town Christian environment.^ For the first time in my life I have enjoyed a lecture, but then it was the sort of one I myself might give when I am older.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

Nietzsche, 1864
.After graduation in 1864 Nietzsche commenced studies in theology and classical philology at the University of Bonn.^ Ritschl , Friedrich Wilhelm, 1806-1876, famous philologist, Professor at Bonn and Leipzig, whose pupil Nietzsche was at the latter university.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In one particular case I know for a fact that a certain student who wished to study philology here was prevented from doing so in Bonn, and that he joyfully wrote to his relations saying he thanked God he was not going to a University where I was a teacher.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

For a short time he and Deussen became members of the Burschenschaft Frankonia. After one semester (and to the anger of his mother) he stopped his theological studies and lost his faith.[3] .This may have happened in part because of his reading around this time of David Strauss's Life of Jesus, which had a profound effect on the young Nietzsche,[3] though in an essay entitled Fate and History written in 1862, Nietzsche had already argued that historical research had discredited the central teachings of Christianity.^ Nietzsche, on the other hand, attacks the morality of Christianity, and that for biological reasons; because he considers its effects ruinous to the race.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nevertheless I was content to bear with the Association, not only because it taught me a good deal, but also because I was, on the whole, compelled to acknowledge the intellectual life which formed a part of it.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Half against my will I decided to go to Italy; though it lay heavily on my conscience that I had already written you a letter accepting.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[4] .Nietzsche then concentrated on studying philology under Professor Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl, whom he followed to the University of Leipzig the next year.^ Ritschl , Friedrich Wilhelm, 1806-1876, famous philologist, Professor at Bonn and Leipzig, whose pupil Nietzsche was at the latter university.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There is this extenuating circumstance, that it will be the last for many a long year—for in the autumn I am going to the University of Vienna to begin student life afresh, after having made somewhat of a failure of the old life, thanks to a too one-sided study of philology.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It was Ritschl who recommended the young Nietzsche to the University of Bale, where he became a professor at the early age of 24.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

There he became close friends with fellow-student Erwin Rohde. .Nietzsche's first philological publications appeared soon after.^ Nietzsche's first philological publications appeared soon after.
  • Archived Biography - Friedrich Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC shadow-raven.home.att.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After the publication of this monumental work in 18,000 pages, the now global movement declared Nietzsche its hero soon after having read the famous first two lines of it: "If I have something to say, I wouldn't say it to Mr. Bush.
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^ My Sister and I , allegedly by Friedrich Nietzsche ( Amok Books , $9.95 paper), first appeared in 1951 in English, the original German manuscript having ‘disappeared’.
  • Denis Dutton on the fake Nietzsche autobiography, My Sister and I 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC denisdutton.com [Source type: General]

In 1865 Nietzsche thoroughly studied the works of Arthur Schopenhauer. In 1866 he read Friedrich Albert Lange's History of Materialism. Both thinkers influenced him. Schopenhauer was especially significant in the development of Nietzsche's later thought. Lange's descriptions of Kant's anti-materialistic philosophy, the rise of European Materialism, Europe's increased concern with science, Darwin's theory, and the general rebellion against tradition and authority greatly intrigued Nietzsche. The cultural environment encouraged him to expand his horizons beyond philology and to continue his study of philosophy.
.In 1867 Nietzsche signed up for one year of voluntary service with the Prussian artillery division in Naumburg.^ It is often a solace to me to exercise my imagination anticipating these later years of your life, and I often think I may one day be of service to you in your sons.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Krug , Gustav, one of the earliest intimates of Nietzsche, a member of a distinguished Naumburg family.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.However, a bad riding accident in March 1868 left him unfit for service.^ When he entered the forest, however, there suddenly stood before him an old man, who had left his holy cot to seek roots.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

[5] .Consequently Nietzsche turned his attention to his studies again, completing them and first meeting with Richard Wagner later that year.^ First husband of Cosima Liszt, who afterwards married Richard Wagner.
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^ She was acquainted with Garibaldi, Richard and Cosima Wagner, Nietzsche, Liszt, Princess Wittgenstein, etc.
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[6]

Professor at Basel (1869–79)

Mid-October 1871. From left: Erwin Rohde, Carl von Gersdorff, Nietzsche
.In part because of Ritschl's support, Nietzsche received a remarkable offer to become professor of classical philology at the University of Basel.^ Ritschl , Friedrich Wilhelm, 1806-1876, famous philologist, Professor at Bonn and Leipzig, whose pupil Nietzsche was at the latter university.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It was Ritschl who recommended the young Nietzsche to the University of Bale, where he became a professor at the early age of 24.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It proceeds to inform the reader that owing to a trick of Ritschls and the stupidity of the people of Bâle I was transformed from a mere student into a University professor.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

He was only 24 years old and had neither completed his doctorate nor received his teaching certificate. Despite the fact that the offer came at a time when he was considering giving up philology for science, he accepted.[7] To this day, Nietzsche is still among the youngest of the tenured Classics professors on record.[8] Before moving to Basel, Nietzsche renounced his Prussian citizenship: for the rest of his life he remained officially stateless.[9]
Nevertheless, Nietzsche served in the Prussian forces during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 to 1871 as a medical orderly. .In his short time in the military he experienced much, and witnessed the traumatic effects of battle.^ DEAR FRIEND: As I have already told you my military duties take up much of my time, but they are on the whole tolerable.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

He also contracted diphtheria and dysentery. .Walter Kaufmann speculates that he might also have contracted syphilis along with his other infections at this time, and some biographers speculate that syphilis caused his eventual madness, though there is some disagreement on this matter.^ There is always some madness in love.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ But there is always, also, some method in madness.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ For, some time or other, I learnt to feel such a loathing for this phraseology that I literally have to be on my guard against dealing unjustly with it.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[10][11] .On returning to Basel in 1870 Nietzsche observed the establishment of the German Empire and the following era of Otto von Bismarck as an outsider and with a degree of skepticism regarding its genuineness.^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Your devoted, FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] To Freiherr Karl Von Gersdorff - October, 1870 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.At the University, he delivered his inaugural lecture, "Homer and Classical Philology". Nietzsche also met Franz Overbeck, a professor of theology, who remained his friend throughout his life.^ Farewell, my dear friend, and remain as affectionate to me as you have been hitherto—then we shall easily be able to endure life yet a while longer.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ My health is really quite normal—but my poor soul is so sensitive to injury and so full of longing for good friends, for people "who are my life."
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It was Ritschl who recommended the young Nietzsche to the University of Bale, where he became a professor at the early age of 24.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Afrikan Spir,[12] a little-known Russian philosopher and author of Denken und Wirklichkeit (1873), and his colleague the historian Jacob Burckhardt, whose lectures Nietzsche frequently attended, began to exercise significant influence on Nietzsche during this time.^ Of course, we must take care that we ourselves do not become too deeply influenced during the process of our research; for habit exercises a prodigious power.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Jacob Burckhardt [43] gave a free lecture on "Historical Greatness," which was quite in keeping with our thought and feeling.
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^ Four times a week we two soldiers who are to serve for a year have to attend a lecture given by a lieutenant, to prepare us for the reserve officers examination.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Nietzsche had already met Richard Wagner in Leipzig in 1868, and (some time later) Wagner's wife Cosima.^ Later on, when you are securely settled down in your own home, you will be able to reckon upon me as a holiday guest who will be likely to spend some considerable time with you.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ First husband of Cosima Liszt, who afterwards married Richard Wagner.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ She was acquainted with Garibaldi, Richard and Cosima Wagner, Nietzsche, Liszt, Princess Wittgenstein, etc.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

Nietzsche admired both greatly, and during his time at Basel frequently visited Wagner's house in Tribschen in the Canton of Lucerne. .The Wagners brought Nietzsche into their most intimate circle, and enjoyed the attention he gave to the beginning of the Bayreuth Festival Theatre.^ She translated "Thoughts Out of Season" parts 3 and 4, into French, but only "Richard Wagner á Bayreuth" actually appeared.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

In 1870 he gave Cosima Wagner the manuscript of 'The Genesis of the Tragic Idea' as a birthday gift. .In 1872 Nietzsche published his first book, The Birth of Tragedy out of the Spirit of Music.^ A composer whose acquaintance with Nietzsche dates back to the publication of the "Birth of Tragedy."
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.However, his colleagues in the field of classical philology, including Ritschl, expressed little enthusiasm for the work, in which Nietzsche eschewed the classical philologic method in favor of a more speculative approach.^ Above all, however, I must set about preparing a more important philological work, the subject of which I have not yet decided, in order to qualify for admittance to the college at Leipzig.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

In a polemic, Philology of the Future, Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff dampened the book's reception and increased its notoriety. In response, Rohde (by now a professor in Kiel) and Wagner came to Nietzsche's defense. Nietzsche remarked freely about the isolation he felt within the philological community and attempted to attain a position in philosophy at Basel, though unsuccessfully.
Nietzsche in Basel, ca. 1875
.Between 1873 and 1876, Nietzsche published separately four long essays: David Strauss: the Confessor and the Writer, On the Use and Abuse of History for Life, Schopenhauer as Educator, and Richard Wagner in Bayreuth.^ The right use of history is to enhance "life."
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^ Between 1873 and 1876, Nietzsche published separately four long essays: David Strauss: the Confessor and the Writer, On the Use and Abuse of History for Life, Schopenhauer as Educator, and Richard Wagner in Bayreuth.
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  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Between 1873 and 1876, Nietzsche published separately four long essays: David Strauss: the Confessor and the Writer , On the Use and Abuse of History for Life , Schopenhauer as Educator , and Richard Wagner in Bayreuth .

(These four later appeared in a collected edition under the title, Untimely Meditations.) The four essays shared the orientation of a cultural critique, challenging the developing German culture along lines suggested by Schopenhauer and Wagner. In 1873, Nietzsche also began to accumulate the notes which would be posthumously published as Philosophy in the Tragic Age of the Greeks. .During this time, in the circle of the Wagners, Nietzsche met Malwida von Meysenbug and Hans von Bülow, and also began a friendship with Paul Rée, who in 1876 influenced him in dismissing the pessimism in his early writings.^ But the rope-dancer, who thought the words applied to him, began his performance.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.However, he was deeply disappointed by the Bayreuth Festival of 1876, where the banality of the shows and the baseness of the public repelled him.^ Certainly the time I spent with him in Triebschen and enjoyed through him at Bayreuth (in 1872, not in 1876) is the happiest I have had in my whole life.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.He was also alienated by Wagner's championing of 'German culture', which Nietzsche thought a contradiction in terms, as well as by Wagner's celebration of his fame among the German public.^ The green numbers of the Grenzboten have just published a Non plus ultra under the title of "Herr Friedrich Nietzsche and German Culture."
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All this contributed to Nietzsche's subsequent decision to distance himself from Wagner.
.With the publication of Human, All Too Human in 1878 (a book of aphorisms on subjects ranging from metaphysics to morality and from religion to the sexes) Nietzsche's reaction against the pessimistic philosophy of Wagner and Schopenhauer became evident, as well as the influence of Afrikan Spir's Denken und Wirklichkeit.^ That which drew me to Richard Wagner was this ; Schopenhauer, too, had the same feeling all his life.
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^ The same evening I played a song of this sort, as well as I was able, and it was so successful that all the angels might have listened to it with joy, particularly the human ones.
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^ If only all those who dabble in philosophy were followers of Schopenhauer!
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[13] Nietzsche's friendship with Deussen and Rohde cooled as well. In 1879, after a significant decline in health, Nietzsche had to resign his position at Basel. (Since his childhood, various disruptive illnesses had plagued him, including moments of shortsightedness that left him nearly blind, migraine headaches, and violent indigestion. .The 1868 riding accident and diseases in 1870 may have aggravated these persistent conditions, which continued to affect him through his years at Basel, forcing him to take longer and longer holidays until regular work became impractical.^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is often a solace to me to exercise my imagination anticipating these later years of your life, and I often think I may one day be of service to you in your sons.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I love him whose soul is deep even in the wounding, and may succumb through a small matter: thus goeth he willingly over the bridge.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

)

Independent philosopher (1879–88)

.Because his illness drove him to find climates more conducive to his health, Nietzsche traveled frequently, and lived until 1889 as an independent author in different cities.^ I love him who maketh his virtue his inclination and destiny: thus, for the sake of his virtue, he is willing to live on, or live no more.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ We could not settle with him until at length he gave me one more sugar cake.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

He spent many summers in Sils Maria, near St. Moritz in Switzerland, and many winters in the Italian cities of Genoa, Rapallo and Turin and in the French city of Nice. In 1881, when France occupied Tunisia, he planned to travel to Tunis in order to gain a view of Europe from the outside, but later abandoned that idea (probably for health reasons).[14] While in Genoa, Nietzsche's failing eyesight prompted him to explore the use of typewriters as a means of continuing to write. He is known to have tried using the Hansen Writing Ball, a contemporary typewriter device.
.Nietzsche occasionally returned to Naumburg to visit his family, and, especially during this time, he and his sister had repeated periods of conflict and reconciliation.^ I am delighted with your idea of returning to Naumburg at Christinas and am much looking forward to that lovely time.
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^ Krug , Gustav, one of the earliest intimates of Nietzsche, a member of a distinguished Naumburg family.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.He lived on his pension from Basel, but also received aid from friends.^ He lived on his pension from Basel, but also received aid from friends.
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  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He frequently made this connection with war (praise does not save lives) and friends (who aid in a progressive life).
  • Nietzsche On Screenwriting - The Artful Writer 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC artfulwriter.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The following day Overbeck received a similarly revealing letter, and decided that Nietzsche's friends had to bring him back to Basel.

.A past student of his, Peter Gast (born Heinrich Köselitz), became a sort of private secretary to Nietzsche.^ Your devoted friend, NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To Peter Gast - January, 1887 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Your friend, NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To Peter Gast - November, 1881 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This is a reference to Peter Gast's constant assurance that Venice would prove beneficial to Nietzsche's health.—Translator.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.To the end of his life, Gast and Overbeck remained consistently faithful friends.^ Farewell, my dear friend, and remain as affectionate to me as you have been hitherto—then we shall easily be able to endure life yet a while longer.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So may we remain faithful friends in 1874 and continue so until the last day.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Malwida von Meysenbug remained like a motherly patron even outside the Wagner circle.^ Malwida von Meysenbug remained like a motherly patron even outside the Wagner circle.
  • Archived Biography - Friedrich Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC shadow-raven.home.att.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Friedrich Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC www.readeasily.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Friedrich Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He became friends with him and, during his leave from the University for one year (1876-77), traveled to Italy with him where they stayed with Malwida von Meysenbug in Sorrento.
  • [Nietzsche Circle][Nietzsche's Work] 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC www.nietzschecircle.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ During this time, in the circle of the Wagners, Nietzsche met Malwida von Meysenbug and Hans von Bülow, and also began a friendship with Paul Rée, who after 1876 influenced him in dismissing the pessimism in his early writings.

Soon Nietzsche made contact with the music-critic Carl Fuchs. Nietzsche stood at the beginning of his most productive period. .Beginning with Human, All Too Human in 1878, Nietzsche would publish one book (or major section of a book) each year until 1888, his last year of writing, during which he completed five.^ And thou, red judge, if thou would say audibly all thou hast done in thought, then would every one cry: "Away with the nastiness and the virulent reptile!"
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ When ye are exalted above praise and blame, and your will would command all things, as a loving one's will: there is the origin of your virtue.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

Lou Salomé, Paul Rée and Nietzsche, 1882
In 1882 Nietzsche published the first part of The Gay Science. That year he also met Lou Andreas Salomé, through Malwida von Meysenbug and Paul Rée. Nietzsche and Salomé spent the summer together in Tautenburg in Thuringia, often with Nietzsche's sister Elisabeth as a chaperone. Nietzsche, however, regarded Salomé less as an equal partner than as a gifted student. Salomé reports that he asked her to marry him and that she refused, though the reliability of her reports of events has come into question.[15] Nietzsche's relationship with Rée and Salomé broke up in the winter of 1882/1883, partially because of intrigues conducted by Nietzsche's sister Elisabeth. .Amidst renewed bouts of illness, living in near isolation after a falling-out with his mother and sister regarding Salomé, Nietzsche fled to Rapallo.^ FRITZ. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Mother and Sister - Sept., 1864 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Your FRITZ. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Mother and Sister - November, 1864 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Mother And Sister - April, 1879 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Here he wrote the first part of Thus Spoke Zarathustra in only ten days.^ What I wrote a day or two ago was only a joke.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ DEAR FRIEND: Since my last letter I have been better, my spirits have improved, and all of a sudden I have conceived the second part of "Thus Spake Zarathustra."
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ And here ended the first discourse of Zarathustra, which is also called "The Prologue", for at this point the shouting and mirth of the multitude interrupted him.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

After severing his philosophical ties with Schopenhauer and his social ties with Wagner, Nietzsche had few remaining friends. .Now, with the new style of Zarathustra, his work became even more alienating and the market received it only to the degree required by politeness.^ Once spirit was God, then it became man, and now it even becometh populace.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Weary ye became of the conflict, and now your weariness serveth the new idol!
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

Nietzsche recognized this and maintained his solitude, though he often complained about it. His books remained largely unsold. .In 1885 he printed only 40 copies of the fourth part of Zarathustra, and distributed only a fraction of these among close friends, including Helene von Druskowitz.^ Permission is granted for electronic copying, distribution in print form for educational purposes and personal use.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ DEAR FRIEND: Since my last letter I have been better, my spirits have improved, and all of a sudden I have conceived the second part of "Thus Spake Zarathustra."
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If you read the last page of Zarathustra , Part I, you will find the words: "—and only when ye have all denied me will I return unto you."
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

In 1883 he tried and failed to obtain a lecturing post at the University of Leipzig. .It was made clear to him that, in view of the attitude towards Christianity and the concept of God expressed in Zarathustra, he had become in effect unemployable at any German University.^ But the idea has already been abandoned, and Heinze, the present Hector of the University, has made it clear to me that my attempt at Leipzig would have been a failure (just as it would be at all German Universities) owing to the fact that the Faculty would never dare to recommend me to the Board of Education in view of my attitude towards Christianity and the concept of God .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It was intolerably haughty in its attitude towards all nations that were not Christian, and yet it was exceedingly ingenious.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.The subsequent "feelings of revenge and resentment" embittered him.^ For a whole year I have been goaded on to a class of feelings which with the best will in the world I had abjured, and which at least in their more gross manifestations—I really thought I had mastered; I refer to the feelings of revenge and "resentment."
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

."And hence my rage since I have grasped in the broadest possible sense what wretched means (the depreciation of my good name, my character and my aims) suffice to take from me the trust of, and therewith the possibility of obtaining, pupils."^ And hence my rage since I have grasped in the broadest possible sense what wretched means (the depreciation of my good name, my character and my aims) suffice to take from me the trust of, and therewith the possibility of obtaining, pupils.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Of course, the thing got to be known here and was the means of my earning much sympathy from the good folk of Bâle.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ You can take my word for it, that for men like me, a marriage after the type of Goethe's would be the best of all—that is to say, a marriage with a good housekeeper!
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[16]
In 1886 Nietzsche broke with his editor, Ernst Schmeitzner, disgusted by his anti-Semitic opinions. .Nietzsche saw his own writings as "completely buried and unexhumeable in this anti-Semitic dump" of Schmeitzner—associating the editor with a movement that should be "utterly rejected with cold contempt by every sensible mind".[17] He then printed Beyond Good and Evil at his own expense, and issued in 1886-87 second editions of his earlier works (The Birth of Tragedy, Human, All Too Human, Dawn, and The Gay Science), accompanied by new prefaces in which he reconsidered his earlier works.^ In every respect I have been my own doctor, and as everything in me is one I was obliged to treat my soul, my mind, and my body all at once and with the same remedies.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In the long "address" which I found a necessary preface for the new edition of my complete works there are a number of curious things about myself which are quite uncompromising in their honesty.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On my table there lies the new edition (in two volumes) of "Human-all-too-Human," the first part of which I worked out then—how strange!
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

Thereafter, he saw his work as completed for a time and hoped that soon a readership would develop. In fact, interest in Nietzsche's thought did increase at this time, if rather slowly and in a way hardly perceived by him. During these years Nietzsche met Meta von Salis, Carl Spitteler, and also Gottfried Keller. .In 1886 his sister Elisabeth married the anti-Semite Bernhard Förster and traveled to Paraguay to found Nueva Germania, a "Germanic" colony—a plan to which Nietzsche responded with mocking laughter.^ The anti-Prussian, anti-German, anti-nationalistic current runs throughout the whole of Nietzsche's correspondence.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Ever your loving, F. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Sister - February, 1886 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ YOUR F. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Sister - July, 1886 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[18] .Through correspondence, Nietzsche's relationship with Elisabeth continued on the path of conflict and reconciliation, but they would meet again only after his collapse.^ Through valuation only is there value; and without valuation the nut of existence would be hollow.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He continued to have frequent and painful attacks of illness, which made prolonged work impossible.^ And I should have returned to my duties immediately if illness had not made this impossible.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

In 1887 Nietzsche wrote the polemic On the Genealogy of Morals.
.During the same year Nietzsche encountered the work of Fyodor Dostoevsky, with whom he felt an immediate kinship.^ My plan for the immediate future is four years of work in cultivating myself and then a year of travel, in your company perhaps.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Where are those old friends with whom in years gone by I felt so closely united?
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This kind of imperfect acquaintance with and rapid discussion of an author's works seemed to Spitteler, particularly in regard to Nietzsche, even then a performance for which he felt he must apologize.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[19] He also exchanged letters with Hippolyte Taine, and then also with Georg Brandes. .Brandes, who had started to teach the philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard in the 1870s, wrote to Nietzsche asking him to read Kierkegaard, to which Nietzsche replied that he would come to Copenhagen and read Kierkegaard with him.^ By-the-bye, a little while ago I sent him one or two passages out of your letters for Frau von Bülow, who had often asked me for them.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He comes to me every Wednesday afternoon and stops the evening, and then I dictate to him or he reads aloud to me, or letters are written.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ At the close of the evening, when we were both ready to go, he shook my hand very warmly and kindly asked me to come and see him so that we might have some music and philosophy together.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

However, before fulfilling this undertaking, he slipped too far into sickness. .In the beginning of 1888, in Copenhagen, Brandes delivered one of the first lectures on Nietzsche's philosophy.^ For the first time in my life I have enjoyed a lecture, but then it was the sort of one I myself might give when I am older.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Although Nietzsche had in 1886 announced (at the end of On The Genealogy of Morality) a new work with the title The Will to Power: Attempt at a Revaluation of All Values, he eventually seems to have abandoned this particular approach and instead used some of the draft passages to compose Twilight of the Idols and The Antichrist (both written in 1888).^ On my table there lies the new edition (in two volumes) of "Human-all-too-Human," the first part of which I worked out then—how strange!
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Spitteler had published a review of Nietzsche's works in the Bund of Berne for the end of January, 1888.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ DEAREST FRAULEIN: At last I am able once again to let you have some news of me by sending you another work of mine.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[20]
His health seemed to improve, and he spent the summer in high spirits. In the fall of 1888 his writings and letters began to reveal a higher estimation of his own status and "fate." He overestimated the increasing response to his writings, especially to the recent polemic, The Case of Wagner. On his 44th birthday, after completing Twilight of the Idols and The Antichrist, he decided to write the autobiography Ecce Homo. .In the preface to this work—which suggests Nietzsche was well aware of the interpretive difficulties his work would generate—he declares, "Hear me!^ Truth, however glances from their eyes, and these tell me (I hear it well enough): "Friend Nietzsche, you are now quite alone!"
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

For I am such and such a person. Above all, do not mistake me for someone else."[21] .In December, Nietzsche began a correspondence with August Strindberg, and thought that, short of an international breakthrough, he would attempt to buy back his older writings from the publisher and have them translated into other European languages.^ Every winter now I intend to write just such an essay for myself ,—the thought of getting it published is practically out of the question.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ THIS volume of Friedrich Nietzsche's private correspondence consists of a selection from the five-volume edition published in Germany between the years 1900-1909.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ She translated "Thoughts Out of Season" parts 3 and 4, into French, but only "Richard Wagner á Bayreuth" actually appeared.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

Moreover, he planned the publication of the compilation Nietzsche Contra Wagner and of the poems that composed his collection Dionysian-Dithyrambs.

Mental breakdown and death (1889–1900)

Photo by Hans Olde from the photographic series, The Ill Nietzsche, summer 1899
On January 3, 1889, Nietzsche suffered a mental collapse. Two policemen approached him after he caused a public disturbance in the streets of Turin. .What actually happened remains unknown, but an often-repeated tale states that Nietzsche witnessed the whipping of a horse at the other end of the Piazza Carlo Alberto, ran to the horse, threw his arms up around its neck to protect the horse, and then collapsed to the ground.^ You do not know this, and that is why I cannot take it amiss that you should wish to see me on other ground, more secure and more protected.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[22]
.In the following few days, Nietzsche sent short writings—known as the Wahnbriefe ("Madness Letters")—to a number of friends (including Cosima Wagner and Jacob Burckhardt).^ Naumburg, March 30, 1856 DEAR ELIZABETH: As mother is writing to you to-day I am sending you a short note to put with hers.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ MY DEAR FRIEND: As the result of stomach and intestinal trouble I have been in bed for a few days and am still feeling rather seedy today.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I seem to write an inordinate number of letters, and yet I get none except from you.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

To his former colleague Burckhardt, Nietzsche wrote: "I have had Caiaphas put in fetters. .Also, last year I was crucified by the German doctors in a very drawn-out manner.^ Also, last year I was crucified by the German doctors in a very drawn-out manner.
  • Archived Biography - Friedrich Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC shadow-raven.home.att.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Friedrich Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ With this object in view, he gathered together the threads of his system "Concerning the Fundamental Delusion of Representation," which he had laboriously thought out for years, and was very happy and proud at the result.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ At long last, let us contrast the very different manner in which we conceive the problem of error and appearance.
  • Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC www.hku.hk [Source type: Original source]

Wilhelm, Bismarck, and all anti-Semites abolished."[23] Additionally, he commanded the German emperor to go to Rome in order to be shot and summoned the European powers to take military action against Germany.[24]
.On January 6, 1889 Burckhardt showed the letter he had received from Nietzsche to Overbeck.^ Note by Frau F.N.: "My brother received this pension which in all amounted to 3,000 francs per annum from July, 1879, to January, 1889.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.The following day Overbeck received a similarly revealing letter, and decided that Nietzsche's friends had to bring him back to Basel.^ Note by Frau F.N.: "In the early part of May I received a letter from Overbeck begging me on my brother's behalf to go to him immediately, as he wished to leave Bâle for good.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ And yet, when I received your letter, my poor dear afflicted friend, I was overcome by a much deeper grief.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ MY DEAR FRIEND: I received your letter yesterday, and this morning, just at the beginning of a week of hard work, your books arrived.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Overbeck traveled to Turin and brought Nietzsche to a psychiatric clinic in Basel.^ Overbeck travelled to Turin and brought Nietzsche to a psychiatric clinic in Basel.
  • Friedrich Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Overbeck traveled to Turin and brought Nietzsche to a psychiatric clinic in Basel.
  • Archived Biography - Friedrich Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC shadow-raven.home.att.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He is brought to Basel and delivered to Wille’s clinic.

By that time Nietzsche appeared fully in the grip of a serious mental illness, and his mother Franziska decided to transfer him to a clinic in Jena under the direction of Otto Binswanger. From November 1889 to February 1890 the art historian Julius Langbehn attempted to cure Nietzsche, claiming that the methods of the medical doctors were ineffective in treating Nietzsche's condition. Langbehn assumed progressively greater control of Nietzsche until his secrecy discredited him. In March 1890 Franziska removed Nietzsche from the clinic, and in May 1890 brought him to her home in Naumburg. During this process Overbeck and Gast contemplated what to do with Nietzsche's unpublished works. .In January 1889 they proceeded with the planned release of Twilight of the Idols, by that time already printed and bound.^ DEAR FRIEND: As I have already told you my military duties take up much of my time, but they are on the whole tolerable.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ After all, we must not lose much time, for it will be printed quickly and must be quite ready at the end of January.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.In February they ordered a fifty copy private edition of Nietzsche contra Wagner, but the publisher C. G. Naumann secretly printed one hundred.^ THIS volume of Friedrich Nietzsche's private correspondence consists of a selection from the five-volume edition published in Germany between the years 1900-1909.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is a question of a very small book—of about one hundred printed pages only.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

Overbeck and Gast decided to withhold publishing The Antichrist and Ecce Homo because of their more radical content. .Nietzsche's reception and recognition enjoyed their first surge.^ Nietzsche's reception and recognition enjoyed their first surge.
  • Archived Biography - Friedrich Nietzsche 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC shadow-raven.home.att.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ We must first analyze the recent accounts of the Stirner/Nietzsche question, then -- after an indispensible consideration of Stirner's clandestine reception -- we will review the period discussions of the 1890s in the context established.
  • Friedrich Nietzsche -- his initial crisis (oct 1865) 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC www.lsr-projekt.de [Source type: Original source]

^ Recognition of Nietzsche's importance increased during the first half of the 20th century.
  • Author Page - Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.magnespress.co.il [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Peter Gast would "correct" Nietzsche's writings even after the philosopher's breakdown and did so without his approval—something heavily criticized by contemporary Nietzsche scholarship.
In 1893 Nietzsche's sister Elisabeth returned from Nueva Germania (in Paraguay) following the suicide of her husband. She read and studied Nietzsche's works, and piece by piece took control of them and of their publication. Overbeck eventually suffered dismissal, and Gast finally cooperated. .After the death of Franziska in 1897 Nietzsche lived in Weimar, where Elisabeth cared for him and allowed people, including Rudolf Steiner (who in 1895 had written one of the first books praising Nietzsche)[25] to visit her uncommunicative brother.^ Ah, dear friend, to live for ever on my own fat seems to be my lot, or, as every one knows who has tried it, to drink my own blood!
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is said to have three nurses and three governesses, one of the former having allowed him to fall.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The first thing to do is to let a number of bright and lively spirits loose upon one's style; I must play upon it as if it were a keyboard.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Elisabeth at one point went so far as to employ Steiner–at a time when he was still an ardent fighter against any mysticism–as a tutor to help her to understand her brother's philosophy.^ Creating ones were first of all peoples, and only in late times individuals; verily, the individual himself is still the latest creation.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ One still loveth one's neighbour and rubbeth against him; for one needeth warmth.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ And even if one have all the virtues, there is still one thing needful: to send the virtues themselves to sleep at the right time.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Steiner abandoned the attempt after only a few months, declaring that it was impossible to teach her anything about philosophy.^ Only now do I understand history; never has my vision been more profound than during the last few months.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[26]
Nietzsche's mental illness was originally diagnosed as tertiary syphilis, in accordance with a prevailing medical paradigm of the time. .Although most commentators regard his breakdown as unrelated to his philosophy Georges Bataille drops dark hints (""man incarnate" must also go mad")[27] and René Girard's postmortem psychoanalysis posits a worshipful rivalry with Richard Wagner.^ I love all who are like heavy drops falling one by one out of the dark cloud that lowereth over man: they herald the coming of the lightning, and succumb as heralds.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

[28] The diagnosis of syphilis was challenged, and manic-depressive illness with periodic psychosis, followed by vascular dementia was put forward by Cybulska[29] prior Schain's and Sax's studies;[30] Orth and Trimble confirm that frontotemporal dementia[31] is indicated rather than syphilis, but refrain from speculating as to the cause. Other researchers[32] agree that syphilis is contra-indicated, but argue against Sax's revival of Hildebrandt’s hypothesis of a benign brain tumor, positing instead a syndrome called CADASIL.
.In 1898 and 1899 Nietzsche suffered at least two strokes which partially paralysed him and left him unable to speak or walk.^ And as, under this European sky, I suffer and am low-spirited for at least eight months in the year, it is a stroke of exceptional luck that I am able to bear it any longer.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.After contracting pneumonia in mid-August 1900 he had another stroke during the night of August 24 / August 25, and died about noon on August 25.[33] Elisabeth had him buried beside his father at the church in Röcken bei Lützen.^ Ten times must thou laugh during the day, and be cheerful; otherwise thy stomach, the father of affliction, will disturb thee in the night.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.His friend, Gast, gave his funeral oration, proclaiming: "Holy be your name to all future generations!"^ Your devoted friend, NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To Peter Gast - January, 1887 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Your friend, NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To Peter Gast - November, 1881 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I suppose all my friends will be there, my sister as well, after your letter of yesterday (and I am very glad of it).
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[34] Nietzsche had written in Ecce Homo (at the time of the funeral still unpublished) of his fear that one day his name would be regarded as "holy".
Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche compiled The Will to Power from Nietzsche's unpublished notebooks, and published it posthumously. Because his sister arranged the book based on her own conflation of several of Nietzsche's early outlines, and took great liberties with the material, the consensus holds that it does not reflect Nietzsche's intent. Indeed, Mazzino Montinari, the editor of Nietzsche's Nachlass, called it a forgery in The 'Will to Power' does not exist. For example, Elisabeth removed aphorism 35 of The Antichrist, where Nietzsche rewrote a passage of the Bible (see The Will to Power and Nietzsche's criticisms of anti-Semitism and nationalism).

Citizenship, nationality, ethnicity

.Nietzsche is commonly classified as a German philosopher.^ It will further more act as a stimulant to the Nietzsche controversy in England and America, just as in France Prof. Andler's [1] book has revived the interest in the German philosopher.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[35] .The modern unified nation-state called Germany did not yet exist at the time of his birth, but the German Confederation of states did, and Nietzsche was a citizen of one of these, Prussia—for a time.^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Zarathustra had thus spoken, one of the people called out: "We have now heard enough of the rope-dancer; it is time now for us to.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Never yet did truth cling to the arm of an absolute one.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

When he accepted his post at Basel, Nietzsche applied for the annulment of his Prussian citizenship.[36] The official response confirming the revocation of his citizenship came in a document dated April 17, 1869[37], and for the rest of his life he remained officially stateless.
Nietzsche's feelings about his national identity were clearly complex. In Ecce Homo, he writes:
.Even by virtue of my descent, I am granted an eye beyond all merely local, merely nationally conditioned perspectives; it is not difficult for me to be a "good European."^ Verily, with other eyes, my brethren, shall I then seek my lost ones; with another love shall I then love you."- ZARATHUSTRA, I., "The Bestowing Virtue."
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In such anchoritic conditions and with such difficult years in a young life, my friendship is actually becoming something pathological.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I am feeling very hostile just now towards all political and smug bourgeois virtues and duties, and occasionally I even soar far above "national" feeling.
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.On the other hand, I am perhaps more German than present-day Germans, mere citizens of the German Reich, could possibly be—I, the last anti-political German.^ But when have we been able to walk more proudly than at present?
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^ Now let me tell you something about my Jupiter, Richard Wagner, to whom I go from time to time for a breath of air, and receive more refreshment by so doing than any of my colleagues could possibly imagine.
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^ If I could accuse myself of any other fault than that of thoughtlessness, I should be angry about it; but as it is I have not troubled myself for one moment about the matter, and have only drawn this moral from it: To be more careful in future what I joke about.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.And yet my ancestors were Polish noblemen: I have many racial instincts in my body from that source—who knows?^ Now, let me tell you something you do not yet know—something which you, as my most intimate and most sympathetic friend, have a right to know.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Ah, dear friend, to live for ever on my own fat seems to be my lot, or, as every one knows who has tried it, to drink my own blood!
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^ In addition to this, with the exception of Burckhardt, Taine is the only man who for many a long year has sent me a word of encouragement and sympathy about my writings.
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[...] .When I consider how often I am addressed as a Pole when I travel, even by Poles themselves, and how rarely I am taken for a German, it might seem that I have been merely externally sprinkled with what is German.^ I did not even like to ask how things were going, but how often, how very often my heartfelt sympathy sped your way!
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^ But even the five conditions that might make life endurable, and are really not pretentious, seem to me impracticable.
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[38]
A later revision of the same passage was discovered in 1969 among the papers of Peter Gast.[39] .In it Nietzsche is even more adamant about his Polish Identity.^ You will hear more about it when I have succeeded in looking at this evening more objectively and from a greater distance.
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“I am a pure-blooded .Polish nobleman, without a single drop of bad blood, certainly not German blood.”[40] On yet another occasion Nietzsche stated: “Germany is a great nation only because its people have so much Polish blood in their veins...^ "German politics are only another form of permanent winter and bad weather.
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^ He gave an excellent address, in which he laid particular stress upon the fact that it was a hopeful sign for Germany that the birthdays of her great men were becoming ever more and more the occasions for national festivities which, in spite of the political disunion of the country, were welding her into a single whole.
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^ At about this time the transfusion of lamb's blood had become fashionable in medicine, only to be dropped shortly after wards.—Translator.
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I am proud of my Polish descent.”[41]

Philosophy

Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882
Nietzsche’s works remain controversial, and there is widespread disagreement about their interpretation and significance. Part of the difficulty in interpreting Nietzsche arises from the uniquely provocative style of his philosophical writing. Nietzsche frequently delivered trenchant critiques of Christianity in the most offensive and blasphemous terms possible given the context of 19th century Europe. These aspects of Nietzsche's style run counter to traditional values in philosophical writing, and they alienated him from the academic establishment both in his time and, to a lesser extent, today. .Some analytic philosophers dismiss Nietzsche as inconsistent and speculative, producing something other than "real" philosophy.^ I have no greater wish than to be allowed sufficient time to mature properly and then out of my plenitude produce something.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.A few of the themes that Nietzsche scholars have devoted the most attention to include Nietzsche's views on morality, his view that "God is dead" (and along with it any sort of God's-eye view on the world thus leading to perspectivism), his notions of the will to power and Übermensch, and his suggestion of eternal return.^ This world, the eternally imperfect, an eternal contradiction's image and imperfect image- an intoxicating joy to its imperfect creator:- thus did the world once seem to me.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Your most devoted servant, FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Sister - January, 1875 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The dream- and diction- of a God, did the world then seem to me; coloured vapours before the eyes of a divinely dissatisfied one.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

Morality

.In Daybreak Nietzsche begins his "Campaign against Morality".[42] He calls himself an "immoralist" and harshly criticizes the prominent moral schemes of his day: Christianity, Kantianism, and utilitarianism.^ Nietzsche, on the other hand, attacks the morality of Christianity, and that for biological reasons; because he considers its effects ruinous to the race.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

However, Nietzsche did not want to destroy morality, but rather to initiate a re-evaluation of the values of the Judeo-Christian world.[43] .He indicates his desire to bring about a new, more naturalistic source of value in the vital impulses of life itself.^ But in man there is more of the child than in the youth, and less of melancholy: better understandeth he about life and death.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ For it is indeed a new experience for me to have no one on the spot to whom I can tell all the best and the worst that life brings me—not even a really sympathetic colleague.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.In both these works, Nietzsche's genealogical account of the development of master-slave morality occupies a central place.^ With these feelings surging in his breast, he submitted the work to the Philosophical Faculty of the place, which happened to be a university town.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

Nietzsche presents master-morality as the original system of morality—perhaps best associated with Homeric Greece. .Here, value arises as a contrast between good and bad, or between 'life-affirming' and 'life-denying': wealth, strength, health, and power (the sort of traits found in a Homeric hero) count as good; while bad is associated with the poor, weak, sick, and pathetic (the sort of traits conventionally associated with slaves in ancient times).^ The state, I call it, where all are poison-drinkers, the good and the bad: the state, where all lose themselves, the good and the bad: the state, where the slow suicide of all- is called "life."
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ As far as my health is concerned, things are not so good as I really supposed they would be when I effected the complete change in my mode of life here.
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^ For the first time in my life I have enjoyed a lecture, but then it was the sort of one I myself might give when I am older.
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Slave-morality, in contrast, comes about as a reaction to master-morality. .Nietzsche associates slave-morality with the Jewish and Christian traditions.^ Nietzsche, on the other hand, attacks the morality of Christianity, and that for biological reasons; because he considers its effects ruinous to the race.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Here, value emerges from the contrast between good and evil: good being associated with other-worldliness, charity, piety, restraint, meekness, and submission; evil seen as worldly, cruel, selfish, wealthy, and aggressive.^ But there have been other ages, and another evil and good.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

Nietzsche sees slave-morality born out of the ressentiment of slaves. .It works to overcome the slave's own sense of inferiority before the (better-off) masters.^ But as soon as I think of your work I am overcome by a feeling of satisfaction and a sort of emotion which I never experience in connection with my own "works."
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It does so by making out slave weakness to be a matter of choice, by, e.g., relabeling it as "meekness."
Nietzsche sees the slave-morality as a source of the nihilism that has overtaken Europe. In Nietzsche's eyes, modern Europe, and its Christianity, exists in a hypocritical state due to a tension between master and slave morality, both values contradictorily determining, to varying degrees, the values of most Europeans (who are "motley"). .Nietzsche calls for exceptional people to no longer be ashamed of their uniqueness in the face of a supposed morality-for-all, which Nietzsche deems to be harmful to the flourishing of exceptional people.^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
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^ That which bids me live, my exceptional and weighty task, bids me also keep out of the way of men and no longer attach myself to anyone.
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^ Now I no longer expect it, and all I feel is a certain gloomy astonishment when, for instance, I think of the letters that reach me nowadays—they are all so insignificant!
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However, Nietzsche cautions that morality, per se, is not bad; it is good for the masses, and should be left to them. Exceptional people, on the other hand, should follow their own "inner law." A favorite motto of Nietzsche, taken from Pindar, reads: "Become what you are" (cf. to Kierkegaard's assertion, in Vol. 2 of Either/or, that in aesthetics you become what you become, whereas in ethics you are what you are).

Death of God, nihilism, perspectivism

.The statement "God is dead," occurring in several of Nietzsche's works (notably in The Gay Science), has become one of his best-known remarks.^ One must discontinue being feasted upon when one tasteth best: that is known by those who want to be long loved.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

On the basis of it, most commentators[44] regard Nietzsche as an atheist; others (such as Kaufmann) suggest that this statement reflects a more subtle understanding of divinity. .In Nietzsche's view, recent developments in modern science and the increasing secularization of European society had effectively 'killed' the Christian God, who had served as the basis for meaning and value in the West for more than a thousand years.^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
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^ What I mean by luck in this connection is no more than the absence of such strokes of ill fortune as that of last year—that is to say, that no other stones should enter the works of my watch.
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^ Four times a week we two soldiers who are to serve for a year have to attend a lecture given by a lieutenant, to prepare us for the reserve officers examination.
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Nietzsche claimed the death of God would eventually lead to the loss of any universal perspective on things, and along with it any coherent sense of objective truth.[45] .Instead we would retain only our own multiple, diverse, and fluid perspectives.^ We shall then be our own mutual teachers and our books will only be so much bait wherewith to lure others to our monastic and artistic association.
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This view has acquired the name "perspectivism".
Alternatively, the death of God may lead beyond bare perspectivism to outright nihilism, the belief that nothing has any importance and that life lacks purpose. .As Heidegger put the problem, "If God as the suprasensory ground and goal of all reality is dead, if the suprasensory world of the Ideas has suffered the loss of its obligatory and above it its vitalizing and upbuilding power, then nothing more remains to which man can cling and by which he can orient himself."^ I either remain dumb or intentionally only say as much as a polite man of the world is expected to say.
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^ Wagner himself, as a man, an animal, a god, and an artist rises a thousand miles above the understanding and the lack of understanding of our Germans.
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^ And if ever I complain the whole world thinks it is entitled to exercise its modicum of power over me as a sufferer—they call it consolation, pity, good advice, etc.
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[46] Developing this idea, Nietzsche wrote Thus Spoke Zarathustra, therein introducing the concept of a value-creating Übermensch. According to Lampert, "the death of God must be followed by a long twilight of piety and nihilism (II. 19; III. 8). [...] Zarathustra's gift of the superman is given to a mankind not aware of the problem to which the superman is the solution."[47]

Will to power

An important element of Nietzsche's philosophical outlook is the "will to power" (der Wille zur Macht), which provides a basis for understanding motivation in human behavior. .But this concept may have wider application, as Nietzsche, in a number of places, also suggests that the will to power is a more important element than pressure for adaptation or survival.^ Thirdly, you can live more cheaply here than at any other place on the Riviera; Nice is a large open-hearted place, with attractions for all.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

[48] .In its later forms Nietzsche's concept of the will to power applies to all living things, suggesting that adaptation and the struggle to survive is a secondary drive in the evolution of animals, less important than the desire to expand one’s power.^ It is a funny thing that in spite of one's best intentions for the general weal one's own paltry personality with all its wretchedness and weakness comes and trips one up.
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^ "And would my powerful longings, all in vain Charm into life that deathless form again—" [45] —as Faust says of Helen?
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^ It looks as if the French were on the road to better things in dramatic music; and they are far ahead of the Germans in one important point; passion with them is not such a very far-fetched affair (as all passion is in Wagner's works).
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Nietzsche eventually took this concept further still, and transformed the idea of matter as centers of force into matter as centers of will to power. Nietzsche wanted to dispense with the theory of matter, which he viewed as a relic of the metaphysics of substance.[49] One study of Nietzsche defines his fully-developed concept of the will to power as "the element from which derive both the quantitative difference of related forces and the quality that devolves into each force in this relation" revealing the will to power as "the principle of the synthesis of forces."[50]
Nietzsche's notion of the will to power can also be viewed as a response to Schopenhauer's "will to live." Writing a generation before Nietzsche, Schopenhauer had regarded the entire universe and everything in it as driven by a primordial will to live, thus resulting in all creatures' desire to avoid death and to procreate. .Nietzsche, however, challenges Schopenhauer's account and suggests that people and animals really want power; living in itself appears only as a subsidiary aim—something necessary to promote one's power.^ Like the most modest of the visitors here, I live incognito ; in the visitors list I appear as "Schoolmaster Nietzsche."
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^ Our lives, our work, and our enjoyment will then be for one another; possibly this is the only way in which we can work for the world as a whole.
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^ I very soon realized too that this same host employed only one servant maid for two houses full of visitors which probably means from twenty to forty people.
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.In defense of his view, Nietzsche appeals to many instances in which people and animals willingly risk their lives in order to promote their power, most notably in instances like competitive fighting and warfare.^ Like the most modest of the visitors here, I live incognito ; in the visitors list I appear as "Schoolmaster Nietzsche."
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^ It spoils my love of life to live among such people, and I have to exercise considerable self-control in order not to react constantly against this sanctimonious atmosphere of Naumburg (in which I include many uncles and aunts who do not live in Naumburg).
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^ I should like to have a little more money in order, for instance, that in the interests of my declining health, alone, and with the view of avoiding innumerable mistakes in dieting that I am exposed to in restaurants and hotels, I might have my own kitchen.
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.Once again, Nietzsche seems to take part of his inspiration from the ancient Homeric Greek texts he knew well: Greek heroes and aristocrats or "masters" did not desire mere living (they often died quite young and risked their lives in battle) but wanted power, glory, and greatness.^ The latter seems inclined to take me up pretty thoroughly; he marvels at the "original spirit" that is exhaled by my works, and sums up their teaching in the term "aristocratic radicalism."
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In this regard he often mentions the common Greek theme of agon or contest.
.In addition to Schopenhauer's psychological views, Nietzsche contrasts his notion of the will to power with many of the other most popular psychological views of his day, such as utilitarianism, which claims that all people fundamentally want to be happy (Nietzsche responds that only the Englishman wants that), and Platonism, which claims that people ultimately want to achieve unity with The Good, or in Christian neo-Platonism, with God.^ With this object in view, he gathered together the threads of his system "Concerning the Fundamental Delusion of Representation," which he had laboriously thought out for years, and was very happy and proud at the result.
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^ One was from Dr. Fuchs, and the other from Dr. George Brandes (the most intellectual Dane of the day—that is to say, a Jew).
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^ The man who only has a few moments a day for what he regards as most important, and who has to spend the rest of his time and energy performing duties which others could carry out equally well—such a man is not a harmonious whole; he must be in conflict with himself and must ultimately fall ill.
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In each case, Nietzsche argues that the "will to power" provides a more useful and general explanation of human behavior.

Übermensch

Another concept important to an understanding of Nietzsche's thought is the Übermensch. While interpretations of Nietzsche's overman vary wildly, here are a few of his quotes from Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Prologue, §§3–4):
"I teach you the overman. Man is something that shall be overcome. What have you done to overcome him? ... .All beings so far have created something beyond themselves; and do you want to be the ebb of this great flood, and even go back to the beasts rather than overcome man?^ I am feeling very hostile just now towards all political and smug bourgeois virtues and duties, and occasionally I even soar far above "national" feeling.
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^ Really the joys were of such a rare and stimulating kind that even today I am not back in the old groove, but can think of nothing better to do than come to you, my dear friend, to tell you these wonderful tidings.
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^ Go to Bayreuth in the summer and you will find the whole theatrical world of Germany assembled there, even Prince Lichtenstein, etc., etc., Levi, [73] too.
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What is ape to man? A laughing stock or painful embarrassment. And man shall be that to overman: a laughingstock or painful embarrassment. .You have made your way from worm to man, and much in you is still worm.^ And now farewell, and may you cross the threshold of your new year of life the same man as you have always been.
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^ MY DEAR MOTHER: I have received everything in the way of food and the necessaries of life—unfortunately, too, your letter, which made me feel very wretched.
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^ Fortunately, however, as far as I am concerned, you have proved your self a man in other ways.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.Once you were apes, and even now, too, man is more ape than any ape....^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
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^ So now I have said all I had to say on this matter, although I know perfectly well that it will not please you any more than it pleases me.
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^ And now farewell, and may you cross the threshold of your new year of life the same man as you have always been.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

The overman is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the overman shall be the meaning of the earth.... Man is a rope, tied between beast and overman—a rope over an abyss ... what is great in man is that he is a bridge and not an end."

Eternal return

.Nietzsche's view on eternal return is similar to that of Hume: "the idea that an eternal recurrence of blind, meaningless variation—chaotic, pointless shuffling of matter and law—would inevitably spew up worlds whose evolution through time would yield the apparently meaningful stories of our lives.^ Our lives, our work, and our enjoyment will then be for one another; possibly this is the only way in which we can work for the world as a whole.
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^ Melody, as the last and most sublime art of arts, is ruled by logical laws which our anarchists would like to decry as tyranny!
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^ I am delighted with your idea of returning to Naumburg at Christinas and am much looking forward to that lovely time.
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This idea of eternal recurrence became a cornerstone of his nihilism, and thus part of the foundation of what became existentialism." [51] Nietzsche was so impressed by this idea, that he at first thought he had discovered a new scientific proof of the greatest importance. He gradually backed off from this view, and in later works referred to it as a thought-experiment.[52]
The idea occurs in a parable in Sec. 341 of The Gay Science, and also in the chapter "Of the Vision and the Riddle" in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, among other places. For further discussion, see Philosophy of Nietzsche.

Influence from Heraclitus

The philosophy of Nietzsche, while highly innovative and revolutionary, was indebted to the pre-Socratic Greek thinker Heraclitus. Heraclitus was known for the rejection of the concept of Being as a constant and eternal principle of universe, and his embrace of "flux" and incessant change. His symbolism of the world as "child play" marked by amoral spontaneity and lack of definite rules was appreciated by Nietzsche.[53] .From his Heraclitean sympathy Nietzsche was also a vociferous detractor of Parmenides, who opposed Heraclitus and believed all world is a single Being with no change at all.^ Now—and she cannot account for the change in her she runs,—she eats, she is cheerful and can no longer believe —that she has been ill.
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^ If the sentence, "Christianity has conquered the world," be changed to "the feeling of sin," or briefly "a metaphysical need has conquered the world," we can raise no reasonable objection; but then one ought to be consistent and say, "All true Hindus are Christians," and also "All true Christians are Hindus."
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^ And all these years no comfort, no drop of human sympathy, not a breath of love.
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[54]

Reading

The residence of Nietzsche's last three years, along with archive in Weimar, Germany, which holds many of Nietzsche's papers
As a philologist, Nietzsche had a thorough knowledge of Greek philosophy. .He read Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Arthur Schopenhauer and Afrikan Spir,[55] who became his main opponents in his philosophy, and later Spinoza, whom he saw as his "precursor" in some respects[56] but as a personification of the "ascetic ideal" in others.^ I require (1) Some one to superintend my digestion, (2) Somebody who can laugh with me and who has cheerful spirits, (3) Some one who is proud of my company and who constrains others to treat me with becoming respect, (4) Some one who can read aloud to me without making a book sound idiotic.
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However, Nietzsche referred to Kant as a "moral fanatic", Mill as a "blockhead", and of Spinoza he said: "How much of personal timidity and vulnerability does this masquerade of a sickly recluse betray?"[57]
.Nietzsche expressed admiration for 17th century French moralists such as La Rochefoucauld, Jean de La Bruyère and Vauvenargues,[58] as well as for Stendhal.^ French critic and historian, best known to English readers by his history of English literature and " Les Origines de la France contemporaine.
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[59]
.The organicism of Paul Bourget influenced Nietzsche,[60] as did that of Rudolf Virchow and Alfred Espinas.^ I have also observed how completely the youngest generation of Parisian novelists are tyrannized over by the influence of Dostoyevsky, and by their jealousy of him ( Paul Bourget , for instance).
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[61] Nietzsche early learned of Darwinism through Friedrich Lange.[62] Notably, he also read some of the posthumous works of Charles Baudelaire,[63] Tolstoy's My Religion, Ernest Renan's Life of Jesus and Fyodor Dostoyevsky's The Possessed.[63][64] Nietzsche called Dostoevsky "the only psychologist from whom I have anything to learn."[65] Comments in several passages suggest that he responded strongly and favorably to the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson. .While Nietzsche never mentions Max Stirner, the similarities in their ideas have prompted a minority of interpreters to suggest he both read and was influenced by him.^ Your last letter full of ideas pleased Overbeck and me so much that I allowed him to take it with him to Zurich to read to his womenfolk there.
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[66]

Reception

Nietzsche’s works did not reach a wide readership during his active writing career. .However, in 1888 Georg Brandes (an influential Danish critic) aroused considerable excitement about Nietzsche through a series of lectures he gave at the University of Copenhagen.^ Brandes , Georg, Danish author and critic of European and American reputation.
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.Then in 1894 Lou Andreas-Salomé published her book, Friedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken [Friedrich Nietzsche in His Works].^ THIS volume of Friedrich Nietzsche's private correspondence consists of a selection from the five-volume edition published in Germany between the years 1900-1909.
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^ Spitteler had published a review of Nietzsche's works in the Bund of Berne for the end of January, 1888.
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^ The green numbers of the Grenzboten have just published a Non plus ultra under the title of "Herr Friedrich Nietzsche and German Culture."
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Andreas-Salomé had known Nietzsche well in the early 1880s, and she returned to the subject of Nietzsche, years later, in her work Lebensrückblick – Grundriß einiger Lebenserinnerungen [Looking Back: Memoirs] (written in 1932), which covered her intellectual relationships with Nietzsche, Rilke, and Freud. .Nietzsche himself had acquired the publication-rights for his earlier works in 1886 and began a process of editing and re-formulation that placed the body of his work in a more coherent perspective.^ As for myself, a long and arduous asceticism of the spirit lies behind me, which I undertook quite voluntarily, though it would not be right for every body to expect it of himself.
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^ Your friend, N. [ edit ] Nietzsche To Peter Gast - October, 1886 .
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^ Your FRITZ. [ edit ] Nietzsche To Peter Gast - July, 1886 .
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.In the years after his death in 1900, Nietzsche's works became better known, and readers have responded to them in complex and sometimes controversial ways.^ THIS volume of Friedrich Nietzsche's private correspondence consists of a selection from the five-volume edition published in Germany between the years 1900-1909.
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Many Germans eventually discovered his appeals for greater individualism and personality development in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, but responded to those appeals divergently. He had some following among left-wing Germans in the 1890s; in 1894–95 German conservatives wanted to ban his work as subversive. During the late 19th century Nietzsche's ideas were commonly associated with anarchist movements and appear to have had influence within them, particularly in France and the United States.[67] The poet W.B. Yeats helped to raise awareness of Nietzsche in Ireland.[68] .H.L. Mencken produced translations of Nietzsche's works that helped to increase knowledge of his philosophy in the United States.^ Ill of Dr. Oscar Levy's Complete and Authorized English Translation of Nietzsche's Works (T. N. Foulis.
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.By World War I, Nietzsche had acquired a reputation as an inspiration for right-wing German militarism.^ It is Nietzsche's reputed responsibility for the World War.
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.German soldiers received copies of Thus Spoke Zarathustra as gifts during World War I.[69][70] The Dreyfus Affair provides another example of his reception: the French anti-semitic Right labelled the Jewish and Leftist intellectuals who defended Alfred Dreyfus as "Nietzscheans".[71] Nietzsche had a distinct appeal for many Zionist thinkers at the turn of the century.^ It is Nietzsche's reputed responsibility for the World War.
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.It has been argued that his work influenced Theodore Herzl,[72] and Martin Buber went so far as to extoll Nietzsche as a "creator" and "emissary of life".[73] Bertrand Russell in his History of Western Philosophy was scathing about Nietzsche, calling his work the "mere power-phantasies of an invalid", referring to him as a "megalomaniac", and writing that he was a philosophical progenitor of the Nazis and fascists.^ Then he inquired as to how the professors were disposed toward him; laughed a good deal about the Philosophers Congress at Prague, and spoke of them as philosophical footmen.
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^ Perhaps it is not the place for anchorites and men who wish to go silently about their life-work, caring nothing for politics and the present?
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^ Nietzsche never wavered in his deep distrust and his fierce denial of Imperial Germany; when near the end of his spiritual life we still find him writing from Nice under date of February 24, 1887: .
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[74]
Nietzsche's growing prominence suffered a severe setback when he became closely associated with Adolf Hitler and the German Reich. Many political leaders of the twentieth century were at least superficially familiar with Nietzsche's ideas. However, it is not always possible to determine whether or not they actually read his work. .Hitler, for example, probably never read Nietzsche, and if he did, his reading was not extensive,[75] although he was a frequent visitor to the Nietzsche museum in Weimar and did use expressions of Nietzsche's, such as "lords of the earth" in Mein Kampf.^ Nietzsche was pleased with the review as such, although he did not conceal from the editor of the Bund the objections he had to it.
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[76] .The Nazis made very selective use of Nietzsche's philosophy; this association with National Socialism caused Nietzsche's reputation to suffer following World War II. Mussolini and Charles de Gaulle read Nietzsche.^ It is Nietzsche's reputed responsibility for the World War.
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^ For the whole world is now waiting for the man of deeds , who strips the habits of centuries from himself and others, and who sets a better example for posterity to follow.
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[77][78] It has been suggested that Theodore Roosevelt read Nietzsche and was profoundly influenced by him,[79] and in more recent years, Richard Nixon read Nietzsche with "curious interest".[80]
.A decade after World War II, there was a revival of Nietzsche's philosophical writings thanks to exhaustive translations and analyses by Walter Kaufmann and R.J. Hollingdale.^ It is Nietzsche's reputed responsibility for the World War.
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^ As to how she is settled there, I know nothing; write me a long and exhaustive letter.
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^ It will further more act as a stimulant to the Nietzsche controversy in England and America, just as in France Prof. Andler's [1] book has revived the interest in the German philosopher.
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.Others, well known philosophers in their own right, wrote commentaries on Nietzsche’s philosophy, including Martin Heidegger, who produced a four-volume study.^ When two friends like us write letters to each other, it is well known that the angels rejoice.
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^ For exact details of this friendship see the preface which Peter Gast wrote to his edition of Nietzsche's letters (volume 4 of German edition, Insel Verlag, 1908).
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^ Knortz , Karl, Professor in Evansville (Indiana, U. S. A.), who tried to transmit to Americans the latest publications of German literature including the Nietzschean philosophy.
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Many 20th century thinkers (particularly in the tradition of continental philosophy) cite him as a profound influence, including Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, and Gilles Deleuze, whose philosophy of immanence has significant similarities to Nietzsche's will to power. In the Anglo-American tradition he has had a profound influence on Bernard Williams due to the scholarship of Walter Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale, which rehabilitated Nietzsche as a philosopher, and American philosophers such as Allan Bloom, Alexander Nehamas, William E. Connolly and Brian Leiter continue to study him today. A vocal minority of recent Nietzschean interpreters (Bruce Detwiler, Fredrick Appel, Domenico Losurdo, Abir Taha) have contested what they consider the popular but erroneous egalitarian misrepresentation of Nietzsche's "aristocratic radicalism".

Works

References

Footnotes

  1. ^ Baird, Forrest E.; Walter Kaufmann (2008). From Plato to Derrida. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. pp. 1011–1014. ISBN 0-13-158591-6. 
  2. ^ Kaufmann, Walter, Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist, p. 22.
  3. ^ a b Schaberg, William, The Nietzsche Canon, University of Chicago Press, 1996, p. 32
  4. ^ Jörg Salaquarda, "Nietzsche and the Judaeo-Christian tradition," in The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), 99.
  5. ^ For Nietzsche's account of the accident and injury see his letter to Karl Von Gersdorff: Letter of Friedrich Nietzsche to Karl Von Gersdorff - June, 1868
  6. ^ A letter containing Nietzsche's description of the first meeting with Wagner.
  7. ^ Kaufmann, p. 25.
  8. ^ Paul Bishop, Nietzsche and Antiquity, 2004, p117
  9. ^ Hecker, Hellmuth: "Nietzsches Staatsangehörigkeit als Rechtsfrage", Neue Juristische Wochenschrift, Jg. 40, 1987, nr. 23, p. 1388-1391; and His, Eduard: "Friedrich Nietzsches Heimatlosigkeit", Basler Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Altertumskunde, vol. 40, 1941, p. 159-186. Note that some authors (among them Deussen and Montinari) mistakenly claim that Nietzsche became a Swiss citizen.
  10. ^ "What was the cause of Nietzsche's dementia?". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12522502. 
  11. ^ Richard Schain, The Legend of Nietzsche's Syphilis (Westwood: Greenwood Press, 2001
  12. ^ "A biography of Spir.". http://radicalacademy.com/adiphilunclassified3.htm#Spir. 
  13. ^ Rüdiger Safranski, Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography (trans. Shelley Frisch), W. W. Norton & Company, 2003, p. 161: "This work [Denken und Wirklichkeit] had long been consigned to oblivion, but it had a lasting impact on Nietzsche. Section 18 of Human, All Too Human cited Spir, not by name, but by presenting a "proposition by an outstanding logician" (2,38; HH I §18)
  14. ^ Stephan Güntzel, "Nietzsche's Geophilosophy", p.85 in: Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (Spring 2003), The Pennsylvania State University Press, University Park (Penn State), 2003-10-15; re-published on HyperNietzsche's website (English)/(German)
  15. ^ Kaufmann, p.49
  16. ^ Letter to Peter Gast - August 1883
  17. ^ The Nietzsche Channel, Correspondences
  18. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica Online. "Förster-Nietzsche, Elisabeth." Search.EB.com, Accessed October 10, 2008.
  19. ^ Letter to Peter Gast, March 1887.
  20. ^ Mazzino Montinari, Friedrich Nietzsche (1974; translated into German in 1991, Friedrich Nietzsche. Eine Einführung., Berlin-New York, De Gruyter; and in French, Friedrich Nietzsche, PUF, 2001)
  21. ^ From the Preface, section 1 (English translation by Walter Kaufmann)
  22. ^ Kaufmann, p. 67.
  23. ^ The Portable Nietzsche, trans. Walter Kaufmann.
  24. ^ Zweig, Stefan (1939) Master Builders [trilogy], The Struggle with the Daimon, Viking Press, p. 524.
  25. ^ Rudolf Steiner: Friedrich Nietzsche, ein Kämpfer gegen seine Zeit. Weimar 1895
  26. ^ Andrew Bailey, First Philosophy: Fundamental Problems and Readings in Philosophy, Broadview Press, 2002, p704
  27. ^ Georges Bataille & Annette Michelson, Nietzsche's Madness, October, Vol. 36, Georges Bataille: Writings on Laughter, Sacrifice, Nietzsche, Un-Knowing. (Spring, 1986), pp. 42-45.
  28. ^ René Girard, Superman in the Underground: Strategies of Madness—Nietzsche, Wagner, and Dostoevsky, MLN, Vol. 91, No. 6, Comparative Literature. (December, 1976), pp. 1161-1185
  29. ^ Cybulska EM (August 2000). "The madness of Nietzsche: a misdiagnosis of the millennium?". Hospital Medicine 61 (8): 571–5. PMID 11045229. 
  30. ^ ""Nietzsche 'died of brain cancer'"". http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/05/05/1051987657451.html. 
  31. ^ Orth M, Trimble MR (December 2006). "Friedrich Nietzsche's mental illness--general paralysis of the insane vs. frontotemporal dementia". Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 114 (6): 439–44; discussion 445. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0447.2006.00827.x. PMID 17087793. 
  32. ^ Hemelsoet D, Hemelsoet K, Devreese D (March 2008). "The neurological illness of Friedrich Nietzsche". Acta Neurologica Belgica 108 (1): 9–16. PMID 18575181. http://www.actaneurologica.be/acta/article.asp?lang=en&navid=133&id=14389&mod=acta. 
  33. ^ Concurring reports in Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche's biography (1904) and a letter by Mathilde Schenk-Nietzsche to Meta von Salis, August 30, 1900, quoted in Janz (1981) p. 221. Cf. Volz (1990), p. 251.
  34. ^ Schain, Richard. "Nietzsche's Visionary Values — Genius or Dementia?
  35. ^ General commentators and Nietzsche scholars, whether emphasizing his cultural background or his language, overwhelmingly label Nietzsche as a "German philosopher". For example: The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy; Source: Nietzsche: A Very Short Introduction (See Preview on Amazon); Britannica; The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche, page 1. Others do not assign him a nationalist category. For example: Edward Craid (editor): The Shorter Routledge Encyclopedia of philosophy. Abingdon: Routledge, 2005, pages 726-741; Simon Blackburn: The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005, pages 252-253; Jonathan Rée and J. O. Urmson, ed (2005) [1960]. The Concise encyclopedia of western philosophy (3rd ed.). London: Routledge. pp. 267–270. ISBN 0-415-32924-8. 
  36. ^ Er beantragte also bei der preussischen Behörde seine Expatrierung [Translation:] "He accordingly applied to the Prussian authorities for expatrification". Curt Paul Janz: Friedrich Nietzsche: Biographie volume 1. Munich: Carl Hanser, 1978, page 263.
  37. ^ German text available as Entlassungsurkunde für den Professor Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche aus Naumburg in Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari: Nietzsche Briefwechsel: Kritische Gesamtausgabe. Part I, Volume 4. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1993. ISBN 3 11 012277 4, page 566.
  38. ^ Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecco Homo, Why I Am So Wise, 3 (trans. by W. Kaufmann)
  39. ^ Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. Ecce Homo: How One Becomes what One is. Translated by R. J. Hollingdale, Micheal Tanner. (New York: Penguin Classics, 1992), 106.
  40. ^ Some recently translations use this latter text. See: Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. The Anti-Christ, Ecce Homo, Twilight of the Idols, and Other Writings: And Other Writings. Translated by Judith Norman, Aaron Ridley. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 77.
  41. ^ Henry Louis Mencken, "The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche", T. Fisher Unwin, 1908, reprinted by University of Michigan 2006, pg. 6, Books.Google.com
  42. ^ Kaufmann, p.187. (Ecce Homo-M I)
  43. ^ Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. The Antichrist. Grand Rapids: Kessinger, 2004: 4,8,18,29,37,40,51,57,59. Print.
  44. ^ Morgan, George Allen (1941). What Nietzsche Means. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. pp. 36. ISBN 083717404X. 
  45. ^ Lampert, Nietzsche's Teaching, 17–8; Heidegger, "The Word of Nietzsche."
  46. ^ Heidegger, "The Word of Nietzsche," 61.
  47. ^ Lampert, Nietzsche's Teaching, 18.
  48. ^ Beyond Good & Evil 13, Gay Science 349 & Genealogy of Morality II:12
  49. ^ Nietzsche comments in many notes about matter being a hypothesis drawn from the metaphysics of substance, see G. Whitlock, "Roger Boscovich, Benedict de Spinoza and Friedrich Nietzsche: The Untold Story," Nietzsche-Studien 25, 1996 p207
  50. ^ Gilles Deleuze, Nietzsche ad Philosophy, translated by Hugh Tomlinson, 2006, p46
  51. ^ Dennett, D. C. (1995), Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life, Simon & Schuster
  52. ^ "For a clear reconstruction of Nietzsche's uncharacteristically careful deduction of what he once described as "the most scientific of hypotheses," see Danto 1965, pp. 201-9- For a discussion and survey of this and other interpretations of Nietzsche's no-torious idea of eternal recurrence, see Nehamas 1980, which argues that by "scientific" Nietzsche meant specifically "not-teleological." A recurring—but, so far, not eternally recurring—problem with the appreciation of Nietzsche's version of the eternal recur-rence is that, unlike Wheeler, Nietzsche seems to think that this life will happen again not because it and all possible variations on it will happen over and over, but because there is only one possible variation—this one—and it will happen over and over." Dennett, D. C. (1995), Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life, Simon & Schuster
  53. ^ Roochnik, David. Retrieving the Ancients (2004) pg. 37-39
  54. ^ Roochnik, pg. 48
  55. ^ Brobjer, Thomas. Nietzsche's Reading and Private Library, 1885-1889. Published in Journal of History of Ideas. Accessed via JSTOR on May 18, 2007.
  56. ^ Letter to Franz Overbeck, July 30, 1881
  57. ^ Russell, Bertrand, History of Western Philosophy, Routledge, 2004, pp 693-697
  58. ^ Brendan Donnellan, "Nietzsche and La Rochefoucauld" in The German Quarterly, Vol. 52, No. 3 (May, 1979), pp. 303-318 (English)
  59. ^ See for example Ecce Homo, "Why I am So Clever", §3
  60. ^ Johan Grzelczyk, "Féré et Nietzsche : au sujet de la décadence", HyperNietzsche, 2005-11-01 (French). Grzelczyk quotes Jacques Le Rider, Nietzsche en France. De la fin du XIXe siècle au temps présent, Paris, PUF, 1999, pp.8-9
  61. ^ Johan Grzelczyk, "Féré et Nietzsche : au sujet de la décadence", HyperNietzsche, 2005-11-01 (French). Grzelczyk quotes B. Wahrig-Schmidt, "Irgendwie, jedenfalls physiologisch. Friedrich Nietzsche, Alexandre Herzen (fils) und Charles Féré 1888" in Nietzsche Studien, Band 17, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1988, p.439
  62. ^ Note sur Nietzsche et Lange : « le retour éternel », Albert Fouillée, Revue philosophique de la France et de l'étranger. An. 34. Paris 1909. T. 67, S. 519-525 (on French Wikisource)
  63. ^ a b Mazzino Montinari, "La Volonté de puissance" n'existe pas, Éditions de l'Éclat, 1996, §13
  64. ^ Walter Kaufmann, Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist, pp. 306-340.
  65. ^ Twilight of the Idols, Friedrich Nietzsche, 1889, §45).
  66. ^ K. Löwith, From Hegel To Nietzsche, New York, 1964, p187; S. Taylor, Left Wing Nietzscheans, The Politics of German Expressionism 1910-1920, p144, 1990, Walter de Gruyter, Berlin/New York; G. Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy, (translated by Hugh Tomlinson), 2006, pp153-154; R. C. Solomon & K. M. Higgins, The Age of German Idealism, p300, Routledge, 1993; R. A. Samek, The Meta Phenomenon, p70, New York, 1981; T. Goyens, Beer and Revolution: The German Anarchist Movement In New York City, p197, Illinois, 2007; a special treatise on that question is: Bernd A. Laska: Nietzsche's initial crisis In: Germanic Notes and Reviews, 33 (2): 109-133.
  67. ^ O. Ewald, "German Philosophy in 1907", in The Philosophical Review, Vol. 17, No. 4, July, 1908, pp. 400-426; T. A. Riley, "Anti-Statism in German Literature, as Exemplified by the Work of John Henry Mackay", in PMLA, Vol. 62, No. 3, September, 1947, pp. 828-843; C. E. Forth, "Nietzsche, Decadence, and Regeneration in France, 1891-95", in Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 54, No. 1, January, 1993, pp. 97-117
  68. ^ Everdell, William (1998). The First Moderns. Chicago: U Chicago Press. pp. 508. ISBN 0226224813. 
  69. ^ Steven E. Aschheim notes that "[a]bout 150,000 copies of a specially durable wartime Zarathustra were distributed to the troops" in The Nietzsche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1992, p135
  70. ^ Kaufmann, p.8
  71. ^ Schrift, A.D. (1995). Nietzsche's French Legacy: A Genealogy of Poststructuralism. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-91147-8.
  72. ^ Francis R. Nicosia, Zionism and Anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany, Cambridge University Press, 2008, p36; Jacob Golomb, Nietzsche and Zion, Cornell University Press, 2004, pp 25-27; against the view of particular influence on Herzl, see: Gabriel Sheffer, U.S.-Israeli Relations at the Crossroads, Routledge, 1997, p170
  73. ^ Jacob Golomb (Ed.), Nietzsche and Jewish Culture, Routledge, 1997, pp 234-235
  74. ^ Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, Routledge, 2004
  75. ^ Weaver Santaniello, Nietzsche, God, and the Jews, SUNY Press, 1994, p41: "Hitler probably never read a word of Nietzsche"; Berel Lang, Post-Holocaust: Interpretation, Misinterpretation, and the Claims of History, Indiana University Press, 2005, p162: "Arguably, Hitler himself never read a word of Nietzsche; certainly, if he did read him, it was not extensively"; Jacob Golomb, Nietzsche and Jewish Culture, Routledge, 1997, p9: "To be sure, it is almost certain that Hitler either never read Nietzsche directly or read very little."; Andrew C. Janos, East Central Europe in the Modern World, Stanford University Press, 2002, p184: "By all indications, Hitler never read Nietzsche. Neither Mein Kampf nor Hitler's Table Talk (Tischgesprache) mentions his name. Nietzschean ideas reached him through the filter of Alfred Rosenberg's Myth of the Twentieth Century, and, more simply, through what was coffeehouse Quatsch in Vienna and Munich. This at least is the impression he gives in his published conversations with Dietrich Eckart."
  76. ^ William L. Shirer, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, a History of Nazi Germany, Touchstone, 1959, p100-101
  77. ^ Simonetta Falasca-Zamponi, Fascist Spectacle: The Aesthetics of Power in Mussolini's Italy, University of California Press, 2000, p44: "In 1908 he presented his conception of the superman's role in modern society in a writing on Nietzsche entitled, "The Philosophy of Force."; Philip Morgan, Fascism in Europe, 1919-1945, Routledge, 2003, p21: "We know that Mussolini had read Nietzsche"
  78. ^ J. L. Gaddis, P. H. Gordon, E. R. May, J. Rosenberg, Cold War Statesmen Confront the Bomb, Oxford University Press, 1999, p217: "The son of a history teacher, de Gaulle read voraciously as a boy and young man — Jacques Bainville, Henri Bergson, Friederich [sic] Nietzsche, Maurice Barres — and was steeped in conservative French historical and philosophical traditions."
  79. ^ H. L. Mencken (Ed.), The Selected Writings of Friedrich Nietzsche, Wilder Publications, 2008, p153 (referring to Roosevelt's published speech The Strenuous Life): "It is inconceivable that Mr. Roosevelt should have formulated his present confession of faith independently of Nietzsche".; Georges Sorel (trans. J. Stanley), Essays in Socialism and Philosophy, Transaction Publishers, 1987, p214 "J. Bourdeau has pointed out the strange similarity which exists between the ideas of Andrew Carnegie and Roosevelt, and those of Nietzsche: Carnegie deploring the wasting of money on the support of incompetents, Roosevelt appealing to Americans to become conquerors, a race of predators."
  80. ^ Monica Crowley, Nixon in Winter, I.B.Tauris, 1998, p351: "He read with curious interest the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche [...] Nixon asked to borrow my copy of Beyond Good and Evil, a title that inspired the title of his final book, Beyond Peace."

Bibliography

  • Baird, Forrest E.; Walter Kaufmann (2008). From Plato to Derrida. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. pp. 1011–1038. ISBN 0-13-158591-6. 
  • Benson, Bruce Ellis (2007). Pious Nietzsche: Decadence and Dionysian Faith. Indiana University Press. pp. 296. 
  • Deleuze, Gilles (1983). Nietzsche and Philosophy. trans. Hugh Tomlinson. Athlone Press. ISBN 0485112337. 
  • Kaufmann, Walter (1974). Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691019835. 
  • Lampert, Laurence (1986). Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300044305. 
  • Magnus and Higgins, "Nietzsche's works and their themes", in The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche, Magnus and Higgins (ed.), University of Cambridge Press, 1996, pp. 21–58. ISBN 0521367670
  • O'Flaherty, James C., Sellner, Timothy F., Helm, Robert M., "Studies in Nietzsche and the Classical Tradition" (University of North Carolina Press)1979 ISBN 0-08078-8085-X
  • O'Flaherty, James C., Sellner, Timothy F., Helm, Robert M., ""Studies in Nietzsche and the Judaeo-Christian Tradition" (University of North Carolina Press)1985 ISBN 0-8078-8104-X
  • Porter, James I. "Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future" (Stanford University Press, 2000). .ISBN 0804736987
  • Porter, James I. "The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on The Birth of Tragedy" (Stanford University Press, 2000).^ They bear the title E. Rohde on The Birth of Tragedy and include your two essays.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ISBN 0804737002
  • Seung, T.K. Nietzsche's Epic of the Soul: Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2005. ISBN 0739111302
  • Tanner, Michael (1994). Nietzsche. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0192876805. 
  • Wicks, Robert. "Friedrich Nietzsche". in Edward N. Zalta. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2004 Edition ed.). http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2004/entries/nietzsche/. 

External links

.

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Thus do I counsel you, my friends: distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful!
.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (15 October 184425 August 1900) was a German philosopher, whose critiques of contemporary culture, religion, and philosophy centered on a basic question regarding the foundation of values and morality.^ Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), the revolutionary German philosopher, wrote the Use and Abuse of History for Life in 1873.
  • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ Ritschl , Friedrich Wilhelm, 1806-1876, famous philologist, Professor at Bonn and Leipzig, whose pupil Nietzsche was at the latter university.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There are questions regarding the truth or untruth of which it is not for man to decide; all the capital questions, all the capital problems of valuation, are beyond human reason.
  • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

See also: The Antichrist, Beyond Good and Evil, and Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Contents

Sourced

.
The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.
  • There are no facts, only interpretations.
    • Notebooks, (Summer 1886 – Fall 1887)
  • In Germany there is much complaining about my "eccentricities."^ In fact, there are no Christians.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For him there is only one sin, to live differently from the way he has been living.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thereupon the youth arose disconcerted, and said: "I hear Zarathustra, and just now was I thinking of him!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .But since it is not known where my center is, it won't be easy to find out where or when I have thus far been "eccentric."
    That I was a philologist, for example, meant that I was outside my center (which fortunately does not mean that I was a poor philologist).^ My brother, if thou be fortunate, then wilt thou have one virtue and no more: thus goest thou easier over the bridge.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ True, he has not at his disposal that great mass of men who stand in need of him—the doctor, for example, has far more than the philologist.
    • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The European of today, in his essential worth, falls far below the European of the Renaissance; the process of evolution does not necessarily mean elevation, enhancement, strengthening.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .Likewise, I now regard my having been a Wagnerian as eccentric.^ The moment I am now forced to say: "I cannot endure loneliness any longer," I am conscious of having fallen to untold depths in my own estimation —of having deserted the highest that is in me.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It was a highly dangerous experiment; now that I know it did not ruin me, I also know what significance it had for me — it was the most severe test of my character.^ It was an extremely dangerous experiment, and now that I know I have not been ruined by it I also realize what it has meant for me—it was the severest test of character I could have had.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ah, dear friend, I did not know what to say to you, so I held my peace and was full of fear and anxiety on your account.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ah, my friend, sometimes I have a feeling that I am leading a most dangerous life, for I belong to the kind of machine that can fly to pieces .
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • So far no one had had enough courage and intelligence to reveal me to my dear Germans. My problems are new, my psychological horizon frighteningly comprehensive, my language bold and clear; there may well be no books written in German which are richer in ideas and more independent than mine.^ But this is splendid news, my dear friend!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Well, my dear friend!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is there no more.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • Letter to Carl Fuchs (14 December 1887)
  • I've seen proof, black on white, that Herr Dr. Förster has not yet severed his connection with the anti-Semitic movement. ... .Since then I've had difficulty coming up with any of the tenderness and protectiveness I've so long felt toward you.^ I am proud of having brought you up—only very few women would have overcome those extraordinary difficulties with such bravery and unassuming cheerfulness.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I simply wanted to tell you that I felt just as you do and would regard it as a disgrace if we could not get out of this state of longing thirst by means of some energetic deed.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    The separation between us is thereby decided in really the most absurd way. .Have you grasped nothing of the reason why I am in the world? ...^ This is the reason why I have kept you waiting so long for news and for an answer to your last letter.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Now it has gone so far that I have to defend myself hand and foot against people who confuse me with these anti-Semitic canaille; after my own sister, my former sister, and after Widemann more recently have given the impetus to this most dire of all confusions.^ I have now told you all about my life as a soldier.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Oh, my darling sister, you imagine that it is all about a book ?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And by the same token to say nothing of the entirely unthinking people who write as historians in the naive belief that their own age is exactly right in all its popular views and that to write by the standards of the time generally amounts to being right, a faith in which each and every religion lives and about which, in the case of religion, there is nothing more to say.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .After I read the name Zarathustra in the anti-Semitic Correspondence my forbearance came to an end.^ My Zarathustra has come to an end in its three acts.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    I am now in a position of emergency defense against your spouse's Party. .These accursed anti-Semite deformities shall not sully my ideal!!
  • You have committed one of the greatest stupidities — for yourself and for me!^ Speaking of Dostoyevsky, in a letter to Gast dated 13th Feb., 1887, Nietzsche says: "Do you know Dostoyevsky?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I suppose all my friends will be there, my sister as well, after your letter of yesterday (and I am very glad of it).
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These things spoil my beautiful letters!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Your association with an anti-Semitic chief expresses a foreignness to my whole way of life which fills me again and again with ire or melancholy.^ It is often a solace to me to exercise my imagination anticipating these later years of your life, and I often think I may one day be of service to you in your sons.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ MY DEAR MOTHER: I have received everything in the way of food and the necessaries of life—unfortunately, too, your letter, which made me feel very wretched.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ MY DEAR FRIEND: What a lot of good you have done me with your letter, particularly as I was lying in bed feeling ill after the journey and full of resentment towards life.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ... .It is a matter of honor with me to be absolutely clean and unequivocal in relation to anti-Semitism, namely, opposed to it, as I am in my writings.^ Truth to tell, I made an attempt I had never made since my Gymnasium days namely, to write well and suddenly my pen seemed to become paralyzed in my hand.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ DEAR MOTHER: If I write to you to-day it is certainly about the saddest and most unpleasant business that it has ever been my lot to relate.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    I have recently been persecuted with letters and Anti-Semitic Correspondence Sheets. .My disgust with this party (which would like the benefit of my name only too well!^ Truth to tell, I made an attempt I had never made since my Gymnasium days namely, to write well and suddenly my pen seemed to become paralyzed in my hand.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Verily, I divine you well, my disciples: ye strive like me for the bestowing virtue.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Would that I were wise from the very heart, like my serpent!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ) is as pronounced as possible
    , but the relation to .Förster, as well as the aftereffects of my former publisher, the anti-Semitic Schmeitzner, always brings the adherents of this disagreeable party back to the idea that I must belong to them after all.^ This is our conviction: we publish it to the whole world; we live and die for it — let us respect all who have convictions!” — I have actually heard such sentiments from the mouths of anti-Semites.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Few people know it, but one must have all the virtues in order to sleep well.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He must not look at things shrewdly and cautiously, to learn about them; he must not look at all; he must suffer … And he must suffer so much that he is always in need of the priest.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ... .It arouses mistrust against my character, as if publicly I condemned something which I have favored secretly — and that I am unable to do anything against it, that the name of Zarathustra is used in every Anti-Semitic Correspondence Sheet, has almost made me sick several times.
    • Objecting to his sister Elisabeth, about her marriage to the anti-semite Bernhard Förster, in a Christmas letter (1887) in Friedrich Nietzsche's Collected Letters, Vol.^ Oh, my darling sister, you imagine that it is all about a book ?
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ For, some time or other, I learnt to feel such a loathing for this phraseology that I literally have to be on my guard against dealing unjustly with it.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The anti-Prussian, anti-German, anti-nationalistic current runs throughout the whole of Nietzsche's correspondence.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      V, #479
  • Mathematics would certainly have not come into existence if one had known from the beginning that there was in nature no exactly straight line, no actual circle, no absolute magnitude.^ There are in truth no harmonious natures.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even if that country were found to be ever so well suited to German colonization, no one would admit that precisely you two ought to be the colonizers.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in The Puzzle Instinct : The Meaning of Puzzles in Human Life‎ (2004) by Marcel Danesi, p.^ Sombre is human life, and as yet without meaning: a buffoon may be fateful to it.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Lead, like me, the flown-away virtue back to the earth- yea, back to body and life: that it may give to the earth its meaning, a human meaning!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .71 from Human All-Too-Human
  • He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster.^ He should also be healthy, and should keep himself so, otherwise he would necessarily become distrustful of himself.
    • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is to be hoped that there are a few people who look upon it as a problem why philologists should be the teachers of our noblest youths.
    • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The preference for antiquity as an abbreviation of the history of the human race, as if there were an autochthonous creation here by which all becoming might be studied.
    • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you.
  • The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.
    • The Dawn, Sec.^ But what you were thinking of was rather a good comrade [ .
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And he prays, suffers and loves with those, in those, who do him evil .
      • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Beyond Good and Evil (trns.
      • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

      297

On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense (1873)

Über Wahrheit und Lüge im außermoralischen Sinn (1873)
In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented knowledge.
Part 1
.
  • Once upon a time, in some out of the way corner of that universe which is dispersed into numberless twinkling solar systems, there was a star upon which clever beasts invented knowing. That was the most arrogant and mendacious minute of "world history," but nevertheless, it was only a minute.^ I should prefer to be miserable, ill, and feared, and live in some out of the way corner, than to be "settled" and given my place in modern mediocrity!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the attempts that I know of to read the history of a “soul” in the Gospels seem to me to reveal only a lamentable psychological levity.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Once natural causation has been swept out of the world by doctrines of reward and punishment some sort of un natural causation becomes necessary: and all other varieties of the denial of nature follow it.
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    After nature had drawn a few breaths, the star cooled and congealed, and the clever beasts had to die. .One might invent such a fable, and yet he still would not have adequately illustrated how miserable, how shadowy and transient, how aimless and arbitrary the human intellect looks within nature.^ The old flood for the sins of Europe is still too much for me; but perhaps some one may yet come to my rescue and help me up to the highlands of Mexico.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why does no one ever look at me with such eyes?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One might imagine a way of writing history which has no drop of the common empirical truth in it and yet which might be entitled to claim the highest rating on a scale of objectivity.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    There were eternities during which it did not exist. And when it is all over with the human intellect, nothing will have happened. .
    • Variant translation: In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented knowledge. That was the highest and most mendacious minute of "world history" — yet only a minute.^ What remains in it are sighs of If only or the knowledge There was once.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      ^ One might imagine a way of writing history which has no drop of the common empirical truth in it and yet which might be entitled to claim the highest rating on a scale of objectivity.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I shall go back a bit, and tell you the authentic history of Christianity.--The very word "Christianity" is a misunderstanding--at bottom there was only one Christian, and he died on the cross.
      • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

      After nature had drawn a few breaths the star grew cold, and the clever animals had to die.
      .One might invent such a fable and still not have illustrated sufficiently how wretched, how shadowy and flighty, how aimless and arbitrary, the human intellect appears in nature.^ But the castration, against all nature, of such a god, making him a god of goodness alone, would be contrary to human inclination.
      • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Let it be recollected how much Goethe knew of antiquity: certainly not so much as a philologist, and yet sufficient to contend with it in such a way as to bring about fruitful results.
      • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

      ^ We are still behindhand in one type of contemplation: to understand how the greatest productions of the intellect have a dreadful and evil background .
      • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

      There have been eternities when it did not exist; and when it is done for again, nothing will have happened.
.
The pride connected with knowing and sensing lies like a blinding fog over the eyes and senses of men, thus deceiving them concerning the value of existence.
  • The pride connected with knowing and sensing lies like a blinding fog over the eyes and senses of men, thus deceiving them concerning the value of existence. For this pride contains within itself the most flattering estimation of the value of knowing.^ He forgets most things in order to do one thing; he is unjust towards what lies behind him and knows only one right, the right of what is to come into being now.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I want to teach men the sense of their existence, which is the Superman, the lightning out of the dark cloud- man.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But just let us consider how a scientific man bungles his life: [Pg 115] what has the teaching of Greek particles to do with the sense of life?—Thus we can also observe how innumerable men merely live, as it were, a preparation for a man, the philologist, for example, as a preparation for the philosopher, who in his turn knows how to utilise his ant-like work to pronounce some opinion upon the value of life.
    • Friedrich Nietzsche - We Philologists 27 January 2010 23:54 UTC www.davemckay.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    .Deception is the most general effect of such pride, but even its most particular effects contain within themselves something of the same deceitful character.
  • Deception, flattering, lying, deluding, talking behind the back, putting up a false front, living in borrowed splendor, wearing a mask, hiding behind convention, playing a role for others and for oneself — in short, a continuous fluttering around the solitary flame of vanity — is so much the rule and the law among men that there is almost nothing which is less comprehensible than how an honest and pure drive for truth could have arisen among them.^ How might statistics demonstrate that there could be laws in history?
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He has to do nothing other than continue to live as he has been living, to continue loving what he has loved, to continue to hate what he has hated, and to continue reading the newspapers which he has been reading.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In other sciences generalizations are the most important thing, insofar as they contain laws.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .They are deeply immersed in illusions and in dream images; their eyes merely glide over the surface of things and see "forms."^ To the mediocre mediocrity is a form of happiness; they have a natural instinct for mastering one thing, for specialization.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nothing could be more unbecoming to them than uncouth manners or a pessimistic look, or an eye that sees ugliness — or indignation against the general aspect of things.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love is the state in which man sees things most decidedly as they are not .
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Variant translation: The constant fluttering around the single flame of vanity is so much the rule and the law that almost nothing is more incomprehensible than how an honest and pure urge for truth could make its appearance among men.
  • What does man actually know about himself? Is he, indeed, ever able to perceive himself completely, as if laid out in a lighted display case?^ I do not know, any more than I know how young I shall yet be.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I can't make out how a German could ever feel Christian .
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nothing could be more untrue.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Does nature not conceal most things from him — even concerning his own body — in order to confine and lock him within a proud, deceptive consciousness, aloof from the coils of the bowels, the rapid flow of the blood stream, and the intricate quivering of the fibers!^ Such a person no longer believes in his own being, no longer believes in himself, sees everything in moving points flowing out of each other, and loses himself in this stream of becoming.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I heard incidentally from him, how even in the University of Tubingen, where I pass for the most negative of spirits, my works are eagerly devoured in secret.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And this most upright existence, the ego- it speaketh of the body, and still implieth the body, even when it museth and raveth and fluttereth with broken wings.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    She threw away the key.
Are designations congruent with things? .Is language the adequate expression of all realities?
  • The liar is a person who uses the valid designations, the words, in order to make something which is unreal appear to be real. He says, for example, "I am rich," when the proper designation for his condition would be "poor."^ If personalities are, first of all, as has been described, inflated to an eternal loss of subjectivity or, as people say, to objectivity, then nothing more can work on them.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For once just measure your height as a knower against your depth as a person who can do something.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My health is really quite normal—but my poor soul is so sensitive to injury and so full of longing for good friends, for people "who are my life."
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    He misuses fixed conventions by means of arbitrary substitutions or even reversals of names. .If he does this in a selfish and moreover harmful manner, society will cease to trust him and will thereby exclude him.^ She has moreover a friendly, accessible and engaging manner, and does not suffer from a desire to be constantly standing on ceremony.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    What men avoid by excluding the liar is not so much being defrauded as it is being harmed by means of fraud. Thus, even at this stage, what they hate is basically not deception itself, but rather the unpleasant, hated consequences of certain sorts of deception. It is in a similarly restricted sense that man now wants nothing but truth: he desires the pleasant, life-preserving consequences of truth. He is indifferent toward pure knowledge which has no consequences; toward those truths which are possibly harmful and destructive he is even hostilely inclined.
.
We believe that we know something about the things themselves when we speak of trees, colors, snow, and flowers; and yet we possess nothing but metaphors for things — metaphors which correspond in no way to the original entities.
  • Are designations congruent with things?^ But the awakened one, the knowing one, saith: "Body am I entirely, and nothing more; and soul is only the name of something in the body."
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One might imagine a way of writing history which has no drop of the common empirical truth in it and yet which might be entitled to claim the highest rating on a scale of objectivity.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are the terrible ones who carry about in themselves the beast of prey, and have no choice except lusts or self-laceration.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Is language the adequate expression of all realities?

    It is only by means of forgetfulness that man can ever reach the point of fancying himself to possess a "truth" of the grade just indicated.^ A religious man thinks only of himself.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In truth, few people serve truthfulness, because only a few have the purity of will to be just, and even among these, the fewest have the strength to be capable of being just.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If only people did not have to hear all the time the eternal hyperbole of all hyperboles, the word World, World, World, when really each person should speak in all honesty only of Men, Men, Men.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .If he will not be satisfied with truth in the form of tautology, that is to say, if he will not be content with empty husks, then he will always exchange truths for illusions.
  • The various languages placed side by side show that with words it is never a question of truth, never a question of adequate expression; otherwise, there would not be so many languages. The "thing in itself" (which is precisely what the pure truth, apart from any of its consequences, would be) is likewise something quite incomprehensible to the creator of language and something not in the least worth striving for.^ But he never wrote a word too many.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Quite seriously, I believe, that Zarathustra turned out to be more cheerful and happier than he would otherwise have been.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One of those is quite enough, at > least until he pops off and we need something to kick in the shins > from time to time.
    • Wagner Fan(AKA Richard Loeb, AKA Jay Kaufman): An appreciation - rec.music.classical.recordings | Google Groups 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .This creator only designates the relations of things to men, and for expressing these relations he lays hold of the boldest metaphors.' To begin with, a nerve stimulus is transferred into an image: first metaphor.^ All these heaviest things the load-bearing spirit taketh upon itself: and like the camel, which, when laden, hasteneth into the wilderness, so hasteneth the spirit into its wilderness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Creating ones were first of all peoples, and only in late times individuals; verily, the individual himself is still the latest creation.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.” (Matthew vi, 33.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    The image, in turn, is imitated in a sound: second metaphor. And each time there is a complete overleaping of one sphere, right into the middle of an entirely new and different one.
  • We believe that we know something about the things themselves when we speak of trees, colors, snow, and flowers; and yet we possess nothing but metaphors for things — metaphors which correspond in no way to the original entities.
.
Nature is acquainted with no forms and no concepts, and likewise with no species, but only with an X which remains inaccessible and undefinable for us.
  • Every word instantly becomes a concept precisely insofar as it is not supposed to serve as a reminder of the unique and entirely individual original experience to which it owes its origin; but rather, a word becomes a concept insofar as it simultaneously has to fit countless more or less similar cases — which means, purely and simply, cases which are never equal and thus altogether unequal.^ This is a parable for every individual among us.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We have become more modest in every way.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To the mediocre mediocrity is a form of happiness; they have a natural instinct for mastering one thing, for specialization.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Every concept arises from the equation of unequal things. Just as it is certain that one leaf is never totally the same as another, so it is certain that the concept "leaf" is formed by arbitrarily discarding these individual differences and by forgetting the distinguishing aspects.
  • We obtain the concept, as we do the form, by overlooking what is individual and actual; whereas nature is acquainted with no forms and no concepts, and likewise with no species, but only with an X which remains inaccessible and undefinable for us.
  • What then is truth?^ To the mediocre mediocrity is a form of happiness; they have a natural instinct for mastering one thing, for specialization.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Just see these superfluous ones!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are in truth no harmonious natures.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .A movable host of metaphors, metonymies, and anthropomorphisms: in short, a sum of human relations which have been poetically and rhetorically intensified, transferred, and embellished, and which, after long usage, seem to a people to be fixed, canonical, and binding.
    Truths are illusions which we have forgotten are illusions — they are metaphors that have become worn out and have been drained of sensuous force, coins which have lost their embossing and are now considered as metal and no longer as coins.
  • We still do not yet know where the drive for truth comes from.^ The instinct of the people no longer comes to meet him.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No longer will my spirit walk on worn-out soles.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That which bids me live, my exceptional and weighty task, bids me also keep out of the way of men and no longer attach myself to anyone.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For so far we have heard only of the duty which society imposes in order to exist: to be truthful means to employ the usual metaphors. Thus, to express it morally, this is the duty to lie according to a fixed convention, to lie with the herd and in a manner binding upon everyone.^ What is the meaning of a "moral order of the world"?
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What is the meaning of a “moral order of the world”?
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In short, we shall make use of every legitimate means in order to establish our monastery upon a secure material basis thus, even for the next few years, we have our appointed tasks.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Now man of course forgets that this is the way things stand for him.^ By that we may now measure how things stand among the virtuosi with the highest demands of modern man for a loftier and purer justice, a virtue which never has anything pleasant, knows no attractive feelings, and is hard and terrifying.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Also to the good, a noble one standeth in the way: and even when they call him a good man, they want thereby to put him aside.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Later on , of course, you will be a rich man, but the thing which is all important now is that you should be spared the care of this "later on."
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Thus he lies in the manner indicated, unconsciously and in accordance with habits which are centuries' old; and precisely by means of this unconsciousness and forgetfulness he arrives at his sense of truth.
  • The venerability, reliability, and utility of truth is something which a person demonstrates for himself from the contrast with the liar, whom no one trusts and everyone excludes.^ Even if that country were found to be ever so well suited to German colonization, no one would admit that precisely you two ought to be the colonizers.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such a person no longer believes in his own being, no longer believes in himself, sees everything in moving points flowing out of each other, and loses himself in this stream of becoming.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My brother, if thou be fortunate, then wilt thou have one virtue and no more: thus goest thou easier over the bridge.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    As a "rational" being, he now places his behavior under the control of abstractions. He will no longer tolerate being carried away by sudden impressions, by intuitions.
.
Everything which distinguishes man from the animals depends upon this ability to volatilize perceptual metaphors in a schema, and thus to dissolve an image into a concept.
  • Everything which distinguishes man from the animals depends upon this ability to volatilize perceptual metaphors in a schema, and thus to dissolve an image into a concept. For something is possible in the realm of these schemata which could never be achieved with the vivid first impressions: the construction of a pyramidal order according to castes and degrees, the creation of a new world of laws, privileges, subordinations, and clearly marked boundaries — a new world, one which now confronts that other vivid world of first impressions as more solid, more universal, better known, and more human than the immediately perceived world, and thus as the regulative and imperative world.
  • One may certainly admire man as a mighty genius of construction, who succeeds in piling an infinitely complicated dome of concepts upon an unstable foundation, and, as it were, on running water.^ Certainly the world would be more redeemed if it were redeemed from these men and old men.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Marriage: so call I the will of the twain to create the one that is more than those who created it.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The transvaluation of Christian values , — an attempt with all available means, all instincts and all the resources of genius to bring about a triumph of the opposite values, the more noble values… This has been the one great war of the past; there has never been a more critical question than that of the Renaissance — it is my question too — ; there has never been a form of attack more fundamental, more direct, or more violently delivered by a whole front upon the center of the enemy!
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Of course, in order to be supported by such a foundation, his construction must be like one constructed of spiders' webs: delicate enough to be carried along by the waves, strong enough not to be blown apart by every wind.
  • As a genius of construction man raises himself far above the bee in the following way: whereas the bee builds with wax that he gathers from nature, man builds with the far more delicate conceptual material which he first has to manufacture from himself.
  • When someone hides something behind a bush and looks for it again in the same place and finds it there as well, there is not much to praise in such seeking and finding.^ This is the first view of it; there is, however, a still more important one.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Not every one may be a Christian: one is not "converted" to Christianity--one must first be sick enough for it.
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Only, one must be rich enough to do so.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Yet this is how matters stand regarding seeking and finding "truth" within the realm of reason.^ Ten truths must thou find during the day; otherwise wilt thou seek truth during the night, and thy soul will have been hungry.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .If I make up the definition of a mammal, and then, after inspecting a camel, declare "look, a mammal' I have indeed brought a truth to light in this way, but it is a truth of limited value.
    That is to say, it is a thoroughly anthropomorphic truth which contains not a single point which would be "true in itself" or really and universally valid apart from man.^ A faith of this sort is not furious, it does not denounce, it does not defend itself: it does not come with “the sword” — it does not realize how it will one day set man against man.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Man himself had been his greatest blunder; he had created a rival to himself; science makes men godlike — it is all up with priests and gods when man becomes scientific!
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If the value of a drama is to lie only in the main and concluding ideas, then drama itself would be the furthest possible route to the goal, crooked and laborious.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    At bottom, what the investigator of such truths is seeking is only the metamorphosis of the world into man.
.
Only by forgetting that he himself is an artistically creating subject, does man live with any repose, security, and consistency...
  • Only by forgetting this primitive world of metaphor can one live with any repose, security, and consistency: only by means of the petrification and coagulation of a mass of images which originally streamed from the primal faculty of human imagination like a fiery liquid, only in the invincible faith that this sun, this window, this table is a truth in itself, in short, only by forgetting that he himself is an artistically creating subject, does man live with any repose, security, and consistency.^ A religious man thinks only of himself.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It does not manifest itself either by miracles, or by rewards and promises, or by “scriptures”: it is itself, first and last, its own miracle, its own reward, its own promise, its own “kingdom of God.” This faith does not formulate itself — it simply lives , and so guards itself against formulae.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I either remain dumb or intentionally only say as much as a polite man of the world is expected to say.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    If but for an instant he could escape from the prison walls of this faith, his "self consciousness" would be immediately destroyed.
    It is even a difficult thing for him to admit to himself that the insect or the bird perceives an entirely different world from the one that man does, and that the question of which of these perceptions of the world is the more correct one is quite meaningless, for this would have to have been decided previously in accordance with the criterion of the correct perception, which means, in accordance with a criterion which is not available.
.
Between two absolutely different spheres, as between subject and object, there is no causality, no correctness, and no expression; there is, at most, an aesthetic relation...
  • Between two absolutely different spheres, as between subject and object, there is no causality, no correctness, and no expression; there is, at most, an aesthetic relation: I mean, a suggestive transference, a stammering translation into a completely foreign tongue — for which I there is required, in any case, a freely inventive intermediate sphere and mediating force.^ The German sounds as if it were a translation from a foreign tongue.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A new pride taught me mine ego, and that teach I unto men: no longer to thrust one's head into the sand of celestial things, but to carry it freely, a terrestrial head, which giveth meaning to the earth!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A historical phenomenon, purely and completely known and resolved into an object of knowledge, is, for the person who has recognized it, dead.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    "Appearance" is a word that contains many temptations, which is why I avoid it as much as possible. .For it is not true that the essence of things "appears" in the empirical world. A painter without hands who wished to express in song the picture before his mind would, by means of this substitution of spheres, still reveal more about the essence of things than does the empirical world.^ These things would have been simply means of increasing the excessive sensitiveness above mentioned.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A breath of illness still hung about me, and so I did not wish to write (unfortunately I have written far too many letters this winter that are full of illness).
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even for things which are still more dear to me than my literary needs, for the delights of a friendly correspondence and for art, I so seldom have a free moment.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Even the relationship of a nerve stimulus to the generated image is not a necessary one. But when the same image has been generated millions of times and has been handed down for many generations and finally appears on the same occasion every time for all mankind, then it acquires at last the same meaning for men it would have if it were the sole necessary image and if the relationship of the original nerve stimulus to the generated image were a strictly causal one.^ And by the same token to say nothing of the entirely unthinking people who write as historians in the naive belief that their own age is exactly right in all its popular views and that to write by the standards of the time generally amounts to being right, a faith in which each and every religion lives and about which, in the case of religion, there is nothing more to say.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is a funny thing that in spite of one's best intentions for the general weal one's own paltry personality with all its wretchedness and weakness comes and trips one up.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps, you know, it might be the last time for many years.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    In the same manner, an eternally repeated dream would certainly be felt and judged to be reality. .But the hardening and congealing of a metaphor guarantees absolutely nothing concerning its necessity and exclusive justification.
  • If each us had a different kind of sense perception — if we could only perceive things now as a bird, now as a worm, now as a plant, or if one of us saw a stimulus as red, another as blue, while a third even heard the same stimulus as a sound — then no one would speak of such a regularity of nature, rather, nature would be grasped only as a creation which is subjective in the highest degree.^ No, let us not speak of marrying!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But it was in a dark room and no one heard it.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even if that country were found to be ever so well suited to German colonization, no one would admit that precisely you two ought to be the colonizers.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .After all, what is a law of nature as such for us?^ But the castration, against all nature, of such a god, making him a god of goodness alone, would be contrary to human inclination.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .We are not acquainted with it in itself, but only with its effects, which means in its relation to other laws of nature — which, in turn, are known to us only as sums of relations.^ When two friends like us write letters to each other, it is well known that the angels rejoice.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus, if the monumental consideration of the past rules over the other forms of analyzing it, I mean, over the antiquarian and the critical methods, then the past itself suffers harm .
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For what means does nature still have at its disposal to deal with super-abundance forcing itself outward?
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .Therefore all these relations always refer again to others and are thoroughly incomprehensible to us in their essence.
  • We produce these representations in and from ourselves with the same necessity with which the spider spins.^ But these are at war with each other, and it appears necessary to overcome them all forcibly, in order not to destroy oneself in their conflict.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ By investigating the dangers of history, we have found ourselves exposed to all these dangers as strongly as possible.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All these things: namely, food, clothing, all the necessities of life.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .If we are forced to comprehend all things only under these forms, then it ceases to be amazing that in all things we actually comprehend nothing but these forms. For they must all bear within themselves the laws of number, and it is precisely number which is most astonishing in things.^ Power they seek for, and above all, the lever of power, much money- these impotent ones!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But they have a taste for all representers and actors of great things.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The sense of form they disavow almost ironically, for indeed they do have the sense of the content : after all, they are the renowned people of the inward life.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    All that conformity to law, which impresses us so much in the movement of the stars and in chemical processes, coincides at bottom with those properties which we bring to things. Thus it is we who impress ourselves in this way
Part 2
.
The drive toward the formation of metaphors is the fundamental human drive, which one cannot for a single instant dispense with in thought, for one would thereby dispense with man himself.
  • We have seen how it is originally language which works on the construction of concepts, a labor taken over in later ages by science.^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A faith of this sort is not furious, it does not denounce, it does not defend itself: it does not come with “the sword” — it does not realize how it will one day set man against man.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Man himself had been his greatest blunder; he had created a rival to himself; science makes men godlike — it is all up with priests and gods when man becomes scientific!
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Just as the bee simultaneously constructs cells and fills them with honey, so science works unceasingly on this great columbarium of concepts, the graveyard of perceptions.
  • Whereas the man of action binds his life to reason and its concepts so that he will not be swept away and lost, the scientific investigator builds his hut right next to the tower of science so that he will be able to work on it and to find shelter for himself beneath those bulwarks which presently exist. And he requires shelter, for there are frightful powers which continuously break in upon him, powers which oppose scientific "truth" with completely different kinds of "truths" which bear on their shields the most varied sorts of emblems.
  • The drive toward the formation of metaphors is the fundamental human drive, which one cannot for a single instant dispense with in thought, for one would thereby dispense with man himself. This drive is not truly vanquished and scarcely subdued by the fact that a regular and rigid new world is constructed as its prison from its own ephemeral products, the concepts.^ And how far away from modernity one would feel there!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And so one cannot judge the German according to a single action.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But where would one find a means of cultivating the power of judgment!
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    It seeks a new realm and another channel for its activity, and it finds this in myth and in art generally. This drive continually confuses the conceptual categories and cells by bringing forward new transferences, metaphors, and metonymies. .It continually manifests an ardent desire to refashion the world which presents itself to waking man, so that it will be as colorful, irregular, lacking in results and coherence, charming, and eternally new as the world of dreams. Indeed, it is only by means of the rigid and regular web of concepts that the waking man clearly sees that he is awake; and it is precisely because of this that he sometimes thinks that he must be dreaming when this web of concepts is torn by art.
  • Because of the way that myth takes it for granted that miracles are always happening, the waking life of a mythically inspired people — the ancient Greeks, for instance — more closely resembles a dream than it does the waking world of a scientifically disenchanted thinker.
  • Man has an invincible inclination to allow himself to be deceived and is, as it were, enchanted with happiness when the rhapsodist tells him epic fables as if they were true, or when the actor in the theater acts more royally than any real king. So long as it is able to deceive without injuring, that master of deception, the intellect, is free; it is released from its former slavery and celebrates its Saturnalia.^ Man must not think.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Parsifal I remember > > > > > because it was presented as more than just borrowing.
    • Wagner Fan(AKA Richard Loeb, AKA Jay Kaufman): An appreciation - rec.music.classical.recordings | Google Groups 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ For in this way, at any rate, our lack of wisdom will have more of a future than their wisdom.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    It is never more luxuriant, richer, prouder, more clever and more daring.
.
There is no regular path which leads from these intuitions into the land of ghostly schemata, the land of abstractions.
^ Then they sighed: "O that there were heavenly paths by which to steal into another existence and into happiness!"
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If that state ever arrives, then no person will let the word World Process pass his lips any more, without these lips breaking into a smile.
  • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

.There exists no word for these intuitions; when man sees them he grows dumb, or else he speaks only in forbidden metaphors and in unheard — of combinations of concepts.
  • That immense framework and planking of concepts to which the needy man clings his whole life long in order to preserve himself is nothing but a scaffolding and toy for the most audacious feats of the liberated intellect. And when it smashes this framework to pieces, throws it into confusion, and puts it back together in an ironic fashion, pairing the most alien things and separating the closest, it is demonstrating that it has no need of these makeshifts of indigence and that it will now be guided by intuitions rather than by concepts.^ I will speak unto them of the most contemptible thing: that, however, is the last man!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love is the state in which man sees things most decidedly as they are not .
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Here and there people go even further, into cynicism, and justify the passage of history, indeed, of the whole development of the world, as essentially for the use of modern man, according to the cynical rule that things must turn out just as they are going right now, that man must be nothing other than what people now are, and that against this Must no one is entitled to rebel.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .There is no regular path which leads from these intuitions into the land of ghostly schemata, the land of abstractions.^ Then they sighed: "O that there were heavenly paths by which to steal into another existence and into happiness!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If that state ever arrives, then no person will let the word World Process pass his lips any more, without these lips breaking into a smile.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .There exists no word for these intuitions; when man sees them he grows dumb, or else he speaks only in forbidden metaphors and in unheard — of combinations of concepts.
    He does this so that by shattering and mocking the old conceptual barriers he may at least correspond creatively to the impression of the powerful present intuition.
  • There are ages in which the rational man and the intuitive man stand side by side, the one in fear of intuition, the other with scorn for abstraction. The latter is just as irrational as the former is inartistic.^ Just see these superfluous ones!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Just think, old man!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ First through this truthfulness will the need, the inner misery of the modern man, see the light of day, and in place of that anxiously concealed convention and masquerade, art and religion will be able to enter as true helpers, in order to cultivate a common culture corresponding to real needs, culture which does not, like the present universal education, just teach one to lie to oneself about these needs and thus to become a wandering lie.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .They both desire to rule over life: the former, by knowing how to meet his principle needs by means of foresight, prudence, and regularity; the latter, by disregarding these needs and, as an "overjoyed hero," counting as real only that life which has been disguised as illusion and beauty.
  • The man who is guided by concepts and abstractions only succeeds by such means in warding off misfortune, without ever gaining any happiness for himself from these abstractions.^ We both know what we have to expect from life.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If they are to be human beings, then they are that only for the man who tests the kidneys.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Antiquarian history knows only how to preserve life, not how to generate it.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    And while he aims for the greatest possible freedom from pain, the intuitive man, standing in the midst of a culture, already reaps from his intuition a harvest of continually inflowing illumination, cheer, and redemption — in addition to obtaining a defense against misfortune.
    To be sure, he suffers more intensely, when he suffers; he even suffers more frequently, since he does not understand how to learn from experience and keeps falling over and over again into the same ditch.

Human, All Too Human (1878)

Our destiny exercises its influence over us even when, as yet, we have not learned its nature: it is our future that lays down the law of our today.
  • Our destiny exercises its influence over us even when, as yet, we have not learned its nature: it is our future that lays down the law of our today.
    • Preface 7
.
One will rarely err if extreme actions be ascribed to vanity, ordinary actions to habit, and mean actions to fear.
  • One must have a good memory to be able to keep the promises one makes.^ One must make one's self superior to humanity, in power, in loftiness of soul, — in contempt.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The rest are merely humanity.--One must make one's self superior to humanity, in power, in loftiness of soul,--in contempt.
    • Nietzsche : The Antichrist 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.fns.org.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ True, for a fairly long time one can keep oneself really busy with history completely harmlessly and thoughtlessly, as if it were an occupation as good as any other.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • I.59
  • Liberalism is the transformation of mankind into cattle. .
    • I.67
  • One will rarely err if extreme actions be ascribed to vanity, ordinary actions to habit, and mean actions to fear.
    • I.74
  • Every tradition grows ever more venerable — the more remote its origin, the more confused that origin is. The reverence due to it increases from generation to generation.^ Each of the three existing types of history is right only for a single area and a single climate; on every other one it grows up into a destructive weed.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wagner played to us before and after supper, and went through every one of the more important passages of the Meistersinger .
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Aye, I wouldn't fear even an attack of that dreadful dysentery if by means of it I could purchase a talk with you every evening.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    The tradition finally becomes holy and inspires awe. .
    • I.96
  • Where there is happiness, there is found pleasure in nonsense. The transformation of experience into its opposite, of the suitable into the unsuitable, the obligatory into the optional (but in such a manner that this process produces no injury and is only imagined in jest), is a pleasure; ...^ And if we were to imagine the most powerful and immense nature, then we would recognize there that for it there would be no frontier at all beyond which the historical sense would be able to grow over or cause damage to it.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then they sighed: "O that there were heavenly paths by which to steal into another existence and into happiness!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Here the word “devil” was a blessing: man had to have an omnipotent and terrible enemy — there was no need to be ashamed of suffering at the hands of such an enemy.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • I.213
  • Unpleasant, even dangerous, qualities can be found in every nation and every individual: it is cruel to demand that the Jew be an exception.^ Between 7 and 9 in the evening I sit still in the dark (I also did this at Genoa, where, without exception, I stayed at home every evening from 6 in the evening onwards; never went to a theatre or a concert).
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .In him, these qualities may even be dangerous and revolting to an unusual degree; and perhaps the young stock-exchange Jew is altogether the most disgusting invention of mankind.^ People may dispute the fact that these youth already have culture, but for what young person would this be a reproach?
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I love him whose soul is deep even in the wounding, and may succumb through a small matter: thus goeth he willingly over the bridge.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This last book, which bears the title of " The Joyful Wisdom ," will act as a special danger signal to many, even to you perhaps, dear old friend Rohde!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • I.475
  • He who thinks a great deal is not suited to be a party man: he thinks his way through the party and out the other side too soon.
    • I.579
  • The advantage of a bad memory is that one can enjoy the same good things for the first time several times.^ Do go out of the way of the bad odour!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ During that time she told me a good deal about old days and recent ones as well; for instance, a lot about you, how Lizzie had grown so thin at Leipzig, and whether she drank cow's milk now, etc., etc.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • I.580
  • No one talks more passionately about his rights than he who in the depths of his soul doubts whether he has any. By enlisting passion on his side he wants to stifle his reason and its doubts: thus he will acquire a good conscience and with it success among his fellow men.^ Thy soul will be dead even sooner than thy body; fear, therefore, nothing any more!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Although I am in my forty-fifth year and have published about fifteen books ( among them that non plus ultra "Zarathustra") no one in Germany has yet succeeded in producing even a moderately good review of a single one of my works.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When people first come to understand Hartmanns joke, then no one will use Hartmanns talk of World Process as anything but a joke.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • I.597
.
In the mountains of truth you will never climb in vain: either you will get up higher today or you will exercise your strength so as to be able to get up higher tomorrow.
  • If you have hitherto believed that life was one of the highest value and now see yourselves disappointed, do you at once have to reduce it to the lowest possible price?^ I have now told you all about my life as a soldier.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I believe that if I possessed all the qualities in which you excel me I should be puffed up with pride and insufferable.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • II.1
  • The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.
    • II.77
  • Many a man fails to become a thinker only because his memory is too good.^ Nevertheless I was content to bear with the Association, not only because it taught me a good deal, but also because I was, on the whole, compelled to acknowledge the intellectual life which formed a part of it.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But it is not the danger of the noble man to turn a good man, but lest he should become a blusterer, a scoffer, or a destroyer.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What I only mention, because neither of us doubts it, is that many more are angry about it.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • II.122
  • The worst readers are those who behave like plundering troops: they take away a few things they can use, dirty and confound the remainder, and revile the whole.
    • II.137
  • A witticism is an epigram on the death of a feeling.^ They would fain crucify those who devise their own virtue- they hate the lonesome ones.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Everywhere resoundeth the voices of those who preach death; and the earth is full of those to whom death hath to be preached.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is possible that they may be among those who understand my “Zarathustra”: how could I confound myself with those who are now sprouting ears?
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    • II.202
  • It says nothing against the ripeness of a spirit that it has a few worms. .
    • II.353
  • With all great deceivers there is a noteworthy occurrence to which they owe their power.^ Power they seek for, and above all, the lever of power, much money- these impotent ones!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In their pity was their spirit drowned; and when they swelled and o'erswelled with pity, there always floated to the surface a great folly.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But they have a taste for all representers and actors of great things.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    In the actual act of deception... they are overcome by belief in themselves. .It is this which then speaks so miraculously and compellingly to those who surround them.
  • In the mountains of truth you will never climb in vain: either you will get up higher today or you will exercise your strength so as to be able to get up higher tomorrow.
  • It is mere illusion and pretty sentiment to expect much from mankind if he forgets how to make war.^ I am almost forgetting how to speak.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And you have the nerve to accuse people of racist and nationalist tendencies, while you and the generation which raised you grew up right in the middle, and as part of the people who perpetrated this racist outrage.
    • Wagner Fan(AKA Richard Loeb, AKA Jay Kaufman): An appreciation - rec.music.classical.recordings | Google Groups 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I either remain dumb or intentionally only say as much as a polite man of the world is expected to say.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    And yet no means are known which call so much into action as a great war, that rough energy born of the camp, that deep impersonality born of hatred, that conscience born of murder and cold-bloodedness, that fervor born of effort of the annihilation of the enemy, that proud indifference to loss, to one's own existence, to that of one's fellows, to that earthquake-like soul-shaking that a people needs when it is losing its vitality.

Daybreak — Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality (1881)

He who is punished is never he who performed the deed. .He is always the scapegoat.
  • He who is punished is never he who performed the deed.^ I love him who scattereth golden words in advance of his deeds, and always doeth more than he promiseth: for he seeketh his own down-going.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .He is always the scapegoat.
    • 252
  • He who lives as children live — who does not struggle for his bread and does not believe that his actions possess any ultimate significance — remains childlike.^ Through the brains of anxious and short-lived animals, who always come back to the same needs and who with difficulty fend off their destruction for a little while.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The children were to learn to believe that they had all already lived a long time dreaming under the earth, where they had been properly kneaded and formed by natures master worker.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 280
  • It is not enough to prove something, one has also to seduce or elevate people to it. That is why the man of knowledge should learn how to speak his wisdom: and often in such a way that it sounds like folly!^ But of this one should not speak.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And why should one not speak like children?
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How I now love every one unto whom I may but speak!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • 330
  • For those who need consolation no means of consolation is so effective as the assertion that in their case no consolation is possible: it implies so great a degree of distinction that they at once hold up their heads again.^ They would fain crucify those who devise their own virtue- they hate the lonesome ones.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I believe she is feeling ill as the result of bad German weather; but the Lama in the atmosphere and the sun of the South holds her head up.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The sort of defensive attitude towards me taken up by all those people who were once my friends has something annoying about it which is much more mortifying than an attack.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • 380
  • One has attained to mastery when one neither goes wrong nor hesitates in the performance.
    • 537

The Gay Science (1882)

Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (1882)
What does your conscience say? — "You shall become the person you are."
Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings — always darker, emptier, simpler.
To what extent can truth endure incorporation? .That is the question; that is the experiment.
  • We are, all of us, growing volcanoes that approach the hour of their eruption; but how near or distant that is, nobody knows — not even God.
    • Sec.^ How can we be so tolerant of the naivete of Christian theologians as to join in their doctrine that the evolution of the concept of god from “the god of Israel,” the god of a people, to the Christian god, the essence of all goodness, is to be described as progress ?: — But even Renan does this.
      • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Shall I tell you all about myself—how every day I set out two hours before the sun rises on the hills and after that take my walks only among the lengthening shadows of the afternoon and evening?
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ God's pity for the only form of distress that invades all paradises knows no bounds: so he forthwith creates other animals.
      • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

      .9
  • Benefiting and hurting others are ways of exercising one's power upon others; that is all one desires in such cases.^ Are we, therefore, necessarily bound to exercise a choice between the one or the other way of living?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Truth is not something that one man has and another man has not: at best, only peasants, or peasant-apostles like Luther, can think of truth in any such way.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such a way of thinking about things has made history the single sovereign, in the place of the other spiritual powers, culture and religion, insofar as history is the self-realizing idea and the dialectic of the spirits of peoples and the last judgment.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .One hurts those whom one wants to feel one's power, for pain is a much more efficient means to that end than pleasure; pain always raises the question about its origin while pleasure is inclined to stop with itself without looking back.^ One can die with it—this is much more than saying that one can live with it.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The transvaluation of Christian values , — an attempt with all available means, all instincts and all the resources of genius to bring about a triumph of the opposite values, the more noble values… This has been the one great war of the past; there has never been a more critical question than that of the Renaissance — it is my question too — ; there has never been a form of attack more fundamental, more direct, or more violently delivered by a whole front upon the center of the enemy!
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In so doing, you are the devils advocate for the very reason that you make success, the fact, your idol; whereas, the fact is always dumb and at all times has looked more like a calf than a god.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .We benefit and show benevolence to those who are already dependent on us in some way (which means that they are used to thinking of us as causes); we want to increase their power because in that way we increase ours, or we want to show them how advantageous it is to be in our power; that way they will become more satisfied with their condition and more hostile to and willing to fight against the enemies of our power.^ We have become more modest in every way.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Today for once we much prefer become joyful in our hearts with our lack of wisdom and to make the day a good one for ourselves as active and progressive people, as those who revere the process.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .13
  • The reasons and purposes for habits are always lies that are added only after some people begin to attack these habits and to ask for reasons and purposes. At this point the conservatives of all ages are thoroughly dishonest: they add lies.^ In truth, few people serve truthfulness, because only a few have the purity of will to be just, and even among these, the fewest have the strength to be capable of being just.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Creating ones were first of all peoples, and only in late times individuals; verily, the individual himself is still the latest creation.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If only people did not have to hear all the time the eternal hyperbole of all hyperboles, the word World, World, World, when really each person should speak in all honesty only of Men, Men, Men.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .29
  • Even the most beautiful scenery is no longer assured of our love after we have lived in it for three months, and some distant coast attracts our avarice: possessions are generally diminished by possession…
  • A thinker sees his own actions as experiments and questions — as attempts to find out something.^ Rather live amid the ice than among modern virtues and other such south-winds!… We were brave enough; we spared neither ourselves nor others; but we were a long time finding out where to direct our courage.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such a person no longer believes in his own being, no longer believes in himself, sees everything in moving points flowing out of each other, and loses himself in this stream of becoming.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No, I don't think Nietzsche will be of any help for you, although you > > may find it useful to help yourself to a few of his phrases quoted out > > of context.
    • Wagner Fan(AKA Richard Loeb, AKA Jay Kaufman): An appreciation - rec.music.classical.recordings | Google Groups 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Success and failure are for him answers above all.
    • Sec. .41
  • Pardon me, my friends, I have ventured to paint my happiness on the wall.^ Like a cry and an huzza will I traverse wide seas, till I find the Happy Isles where my friends sojourn;- .
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Meanwhile may the happiness of my friends increase and flourish.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ MY DEAR FRIEND: It was a happy thought on your part to write me such a letter.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .56
  • But let us not forget this either: it is enough to create new names and estimations and probabilities in order to create in the long run new "things."
    • Sec.^ For in this matter these people have practised giving things new names and have even re-christened the devil.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Cultivate forgetfulness and anything else new and quite different from these things, in order that I may learn to laugh at the loss of such friends!
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .58
  • Without art we would be nothing but foreground and live entirely in the spell of that perspective which makes what is closest at hand and most vulgar appear as if it were vast, and reality itself.
    • Sec.^ For it gets up in the present like a number without any odd fraction left over; it does not know how to play a part, hides nothing, and appears in each moment exactly and entirely what it is.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      ^ For that very reason our modern culture is not something living, because it does let itself be understood at all without that contradiction; that is, it is really no true culture, but only a way of knowing about culture.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      ^ So the Greek idea of culture reveals itself to him, in opposition to the Roman, the idea of culture as a new and improved nature, without inner and outer, without pretence and convention, culture as a unanimous sense of living, thinking, appearing, and willing.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      78
  • Good prose is written only face to face with poetry.
    • Sec. .92
  • Art furnishes us with eyes and hands and above all the good conscience to be able to turn ourselves into such a phenomenon.^ Let us continue to do that which we enjoy doing—that which gives us a clean conscience about ourselves; for the rest, silence or gloria , "as God may please."
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He must shine the bright light of ideas to illuminate their unconscious resistance and turn that into a conscious and loudly uttered consciousness.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With such matter one could not help but produce some effect; for the tongues of many would have been unloosed and enough would have been put into words that could not be so quickly forgotten, much that today is almost as good as forgotten yea, that is scarcely to hand.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 107
  • To what extent can truth endure incorporation? That is the question; that is the experiment.
    • Sec. 110
  • Morality is herd instinct in the individual.
    • Sec. 116
  • Gott ist tot! Gott bleibt tot! Und wir haben ihn getötet. Aph. 125
    • God is dead! God remains dead! And we have killed him.
    • Sec. 125
  • Mystical explanations are considered deep; the truth is, they are not even shallow.
    • Sec. .126; variant translation: Mystical explanations are thought to be deep; the truth is that they are not even shallow.
  • The Christian resolution to find the world ugly and bad has made the world ugly and bad.
    • Sec.^ Go to Bayreuth in the summer and you will find the whole theatrical world of Germany assembled there, even Prince Lichtenstein, etc., etc., Levi, [73] too.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ They made signs in blood along the way that they went, and their folly taught them that the truth is proved by blood.
      • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Therefore must I descend into the deep: as thou doest in the evening, when thou goest behind the sea, and givest light also to the nether-world, thou exuberant star!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .130
  • What is now decisive against Christianity is our taste, no longer our reasons.^ Raise no longer an arm against them!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Really, these dissertations on Christianity and on the opinions of this man and that as to what I should do and ought to think on the subject should no longer be directed to my address.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We let our feelings jump about in ways they no longer do nowadays.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 132
.
We have no dreams at all or interesting ones.
^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ To all those belauded sages of the academic chairs, wisdom was sleep without dreams: they knew no higher significance of life.
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ No one seems to have gained the smallest experience through me, or to have thought about me—all that people say to me is decent and benevolent, but so far, far away.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

.We should learn to be awake the same way — not at all or in an interesting manner.
  • To find everything profound — that is an inconvenient trait. It makes one strain one's eyes all the time, and in the end one finds more than one might have wished.^ But here one should not wish to be sparing.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In so doing, you are the devils advocate for the very reason that you make success, the fact, your idol; whereas, the fact is always dumb and at all times has looked more like a calf than a god.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So now I have said all I had to say on this matter, although I know perfectly well that it will not please you any more than it pleases me.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 158
  • We are always in our own company.
    • Sec. .166
  • Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings — always darker, emptier, simpler.
    • Sec.^ Jacob Burckhardt [43] gave a free lecture on "Historical Greatness," which was quite in keeping with our thought and feeling.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      179
  • The most perfidious way of harming a cause consists of defending it deliberately with faulty arguments.
    • Sec. .191
  • We have no dreams at all or interesting ones.^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No—they one and all "mean well" by me.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To all those belauded sages of the academic chairs, wisdom was sleep without dreams: they knew no higher significance of life.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .We should learn to be awake the same way — not at all or in an interesting manner.
    • Sec.^ And to go out of the way of all who sleep badly and keep awake at night!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Nine Bâle newspapers have now referred to me in all manner of ways, but on the whole much more seriously than that truculent Grenzboten reviewer and humbug.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      232
  • New Domestic Animals. .I want to have my lion and my eagle about me, that I may always have hints and premonitions concerning the amount of my strength or weakness.^ If we assume there is a concern in one mans case with Democritus, then the question always on my lips is this: Why then just Democritus?
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I may take it upon me and rejoice in my strength.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The beast wants to answer, too, and say: That comes about because I always immediately forget what I wanted to say.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    Must I look down on them today, and be afraid of them? .And will the hour come once more when they will look up to me, and tremble?^ The monumental is definitely not to rise up once more.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His son has been a missionary in India since 1858, and is expected to come to Chur next year in order to see his father once more.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I brought a large basketful of books with me to this place, so I am once more fixed up for a spell of three months.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 250
  • Die Leugner des Zufalls. — 'Kein Sieger glaubt an den Zufall.'
    • Those who deny chance. — 'No victor believes in chance.'
      • Sec. 258.
  • Was sagt dein Gewissen? — 'Du sollst der werden, der du bist.'
    • What does your conscience say? — ."You shall become the person you are."
    • Variant translation: Become who you are.
    • It is noted here and here that the phrase was first used by Pindar, and was merely re-used by Nietzsche.
    • Sec.^ And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The true life, the life eternal has been found — it is not merely promised, it is here, it is in you ; it is the life that lies in love free from all retreats and exclusions, from all keeping of distances.
      • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Ye lonesome ones of today, ye seceding ones, ye shall one day be a people: out of you who have chosen yourselves, shall a chosen people arise:- and out of it the Superman.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      270.
The secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and greatest enjoyment is — to live dangerously.
  • What is the seal of liberation? — No longer being ashamed in front of oneself.
    • Sec. .275
  • There is something laughable about the sight of authors who enjoy the rustling folds of long and involved sentences: they are trying to cover up their feet.^ There are the terrible ones who carry about in themselves the beast of prey, and have no choice except lusts or self-laceration.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The sort of defensive attitude towards me taken up by all those people who were once my friends has something annoying about it which is much more mortifying than an attack.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They are getting away from the old thunderous manner, with its long sentences and its tedious grammatical complexities.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 282
  • For believe me! — the secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is: to live dangerously! Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius! Send your ships into uncharted seas! .Live at war with your peers and yourselves!^ So live your life of obedience and of war!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Be robbers and conquerors as long as you cannot be rulers and possessors, you seekers of knowledge!^ And if ye cannot be saints of knowledge, then, I pray you, be at least its warriors.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Soon the age will be past when you could be content to live hidden in forests like shy deer!^ If you choose to do so you may, if you like, talk nonsense about me to your heart's content—that lies in the natura verum [97] ; I have never complained about it or ever expected anything else.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of course, what I should have liked most of all would have been to tell you everything by word of mouth, but the time seems long past when this wish might have been gratified.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .At long last the search for knowledge will reach out for its due: — it will want to rule and possess, and you with it!^ I simply wanted to tell you that I felt just as you do and would regard it as a disgrace if we could not get out of this state of longing thirst by means of some energetic deed.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A mass of diseases that reach out into the world through the spirit; there they want to get their prey.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is the reason why I have kept you waiting so long for news and for an answer to your last letter.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .283; Variant translation: For believe me: the secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and greatest enjoyment is — to live dangerously.
  • Everything good, fine or great they do is first of all an argument against the skeptic inside them.^ But they have a taste for all representers and actors of great things.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Dead are all the Gods: now do we desire the Superman to live."- Let this be our final will at the great noontide!- .
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But the castration, against all nature, of such a god, making him a god of goodness alone, would be contrary to human inclination.
    • The Antichrist - by Friedrich Nietzsche 20 November 2009 10:010 UTC www.antichrist.net [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .284
  • Perhaps man will rise ever higher as soon as he ceases to flow out into a god.^ Ye constrain all things to flow towards you and into you, so that they shall flow back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your love.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wagner himself, as a man, an animal, a god, and an artist rises a thousand miles above the understanding and the lack of understanding of our Germans.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Give us this last man, O Zarathustra,"- they called out- "make us into these last men!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .285
  • We want to be poets of our life — first of all in the smallest most everyday matters.
    • Sec.^ My body (and my philosophy, too, for that matter), feels the cold to be its appointed preservative element—that sounds paradoxical and negative, but it is the most thoroughly demonstrated fact of my life.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ But what seemed to agitate him most of all was the prospect of seeing his opera accepted by the Hanover Theatre and produced for the first time.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ First give me life; then I will make a culture out of it for you!so shouts each individual of this first generation, and all these individuals will recognize each other from this call.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      .299
  • Whatever has value in our world now does not have value in itself, according to its nature — nature is always value-less, but has been given value at some time, as a present — and it was we who gave and bestowed it.
    • Sec.^ And now for a quick look at our time!
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      ^ (I have been in the ladies choir some time now, and had the joy of rehearsing this peace with them.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ What people in earlier times gave the church, people now give, although in scantier amounts, to scientific knowledge.
      • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

      .302
  • It is true that there are men who, on the approach of severe pain, hear the very opposite call of command, and never appear more proud, more martial, or more happy than when the storm is brewing; indeed, pain itself provides them with their supreme moments!^ For the moment I am really very, very tired of everything—more than tired.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Quite seriously, I believe, that Zarathustra turned out to be more cheerful and happier than he would otherwise have been.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These are the heroic men, the great pain-bringers of mankind: those few and rare ones who need just the same apology as pain generally — and verily, it should not be denied them.^ Just see these superfluous ones!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One must discontinue being feasted upon when one tasteth best: that is known by those who want to be long loved.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They would fain crucify those who devise their own virtue- they hate the lonesome ones.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    They are forces of the greatest importance for preserving and advancing the species, be it only because they are opposed to smug ease, and do not conceal their disgust at this kind of happiness.
    • Sec. .318
  • Who can attain to anything great if he does not feel in himself the force and will to inflict great pain?^ At present there is not a soul in Germany who has an inkling of what I want, or of the fact that I want anything at all, or even that I have already attained a not insignificant portion thereof.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The ability to suffer is a small matter: in that line, weak women and even slaves often attain masterliness.^ I love him whose soul is deep even in the wounding, and may succumb through a small matter: thus goeth he willingly over the bridge.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    But not to perish from internal distress and doubt when one inflicts great suffering and hears the cry of it — that is great, that belongs to greatness.
    • Sec. .325
  • Could one count such dilettantes and old spinsters as that mawkish apostle of virginity, Mainlander, as a genuine German?^ What I envy in Epicurus are the disciples in his garden, aye, in such circumstances one could certainly forget noble Greece and more certainly still ignoble Germany!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .In the last analysis he probably was a Jew (all Jews become mawkish when they moralize).^ For they will probably all answer No!, but they will substantiate that No!
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But of time and of becoming shall the best similes speak: a praise shall they be, and a justification of all perishableness!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .357
  • I would not know what the spirit of a philosopher might wish more to be than a good dancer.
    • Sec.^ It is possible I wish to become more of a free spirit than I am capable of becoming.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Quite seriously, I believe, that Zarathustra turned out to be more cheerful and happier than he would otherwise have been.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ So now I have said all I had to say on this matter, although I know perfectly well that it will not please you any more than it pleases me.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .381
  • We "conserve" nothing; neither do we want to return to any past periods; we are not by any means "liberal"; we do not work for "progress"; we do not need to plug up our ears against the sirens who in the market place sing of the future: their song about "equal rights," "a free society," "no more masters and no servants" has no allure for us.
  • We simply do not consider it desirable that a realm of justice and concord should be established on earth (because it would certainly be the realm of the deepest leveling and chinoiserie); we are delighted with all who love, as we do, danger, war, and adventures, who refuse to compromise, to be captured, reconciled, and castrated; we count ourselves among conquerors; we think about the necessity for new orders, also for a new slavery — for every strengthening and enhancement of the human type also involves a new kind of enslavement.^ Better songs would they have to sing, for me to believe in their Saviour: more!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I need living companions, who will follow me because they want to follow themselves- and to the place where I will.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And if it no longer carries us, then that is also all right.
    • New Page 2 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC records.viu.ca [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • The term chinoiserie indicates "unnecessary complication" and some translations point out that this passage invokes ideas in the concluding poem of Beyond Good and Evil: "nur wer sich wandelt bleibt mit mir verwandt" : Only those who keep changing remain akin to me.
  • Is it not clear that with all this we are bound to feel ill at ease in an age that likes to claim the distinction of being the most humane, the mildest, and the most righteous age that the sun has ever seen?^ If only all those who dabble in philosophy were followers of Schopenhauer!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Similes, are all names of good and evil; they do not speak out, they only hint.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One must discontinue being feasted upon when one tasteth best: that is known by those who want to be long loved.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .It is bad enough that precisely when we hear these beautiful words we have the ugliest suspicions.^ And lately, did I hear him say these words: "God is dead: of his pity for man hath God died."- .
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Truth, however glances from their eyes, and these tell me (I hear it well enough): "Friend Nietzsche, you are now quite alone!"
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    What we find in them is merely an expression — and a masquerade — of a profound weakening, of weariness, of old age, of declining energies. What can it matter to us what tinsel the sick may use to cover up their weakness? .Let them parade it as their virtue; after all, there is no doubt that weakness makes one mild, oh so mild, so righteous, so inoffensive, so "humane"!
    • Sec.^ My brother, if thou be fortunate, then wilt thou have one virtue and no more: thus goest thou easier over the bridge.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ There are the terrible ones who carry about in themselves the beast of prey, and have no choice except lusts or self-laceration.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ MY BROTHER, when thou hast a virtue, and it is thine own virtue, thou hast it in common with no one.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      377
  • Preparatory human beings. — .I welcome all signs that a more virile, warlike age is about to begin, which will restore honor to courage above all!^ At Bayreuth I hope to find courage and good cheer once more and to fortify myself in all that is right.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Above all, however, I must set about preparing a more important philological work, the subject of which I have not yet decided, in order to qualify for admittance to the college at Leipzig.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    For this age shall prepare the way for one yet higher, and it shall gather the strength that this higher age will require some day — the age that will carry heroism into the search for knowledge and that will wage wars for the sake of ideas and their consequences.
  • To this end we now need many preparatory courageous human beings who cannot very well leap out of nothing — any more than out of the sand and slime of present-day civilization and metropolitanism: human beings who know how to be silent, lonely, resolute, and content and constant in invisible activities; human beings who are bent on seeking in all things for what in them must be overcome; human beings distinguished as much by cheerfulness, patience, unpretentiousness, and contempt for all great vanities as by magnanimity in victory and forbearance regarding the small vanities of the vanquished; human beings whose judgment concerning all victors and the share of chance in every victory and fame is sharp and free; human beings with their own festivals, their own working days, and their own periods of mourning, accustomed to command with assurance but instantly ready to obey when that is called for, equally proud, equally serving their own cause in both cases; more endangered human beings, more fruitful human beings, happier beings!

Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1885)

Also sprach Zarathustra (In German) Thus Spake Zarathustra (English translation)
.
I tell you: one must have chaos within oneself, to give birth to a dancing star.
  • Du grosses Gestirn!^ I miss you terribly, so give me the comfort of your presence and try to make your stay not too short a one.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I hope shortly to be able to give you an account of my experiences in person, and I am also bringing you one or two chassepot bullets picked up on the battlefields.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have just got hold of a newspaper containing a description of this awful night, which is far more picturesque than the one your humble friend has been able to give you.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Was wäre dein Glück, wenn du nicht Die hättest, welchen du leuchtest!
    • You great star, what would your happiness be had you not those for whom you shine?
    • Prologue 1
  • Ihr habt den Weg vom Wurme zum Menschen gemacht, und Vieles ist in euch noch Wurm.^ What would be thy happiness if thou hadst not those for whom thou shinest!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Oh, how gladly would I not sit with you and your dear wife beneath some Homeric Phæacien sky!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ At the thought of this first great achievement of your life, I feel indescribably happy and solemn; I shall not fail to remember August 24, 1881!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Einst wart ihr Affen, und auch jetzt ist der Mensch mehr Affe, als irgend ein Affe.
    • You have evolved from worm to man, but much within you is still worm.^ Ye have made your way from the worm to man, and much within you is still worm.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Oh, how much that wishes to become word and form still lies concealed within me!
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ It was as this man that you won your friends, and if there are still a few sensible women knocking around you will not have much longer "To wander alone like a rhinoceros."
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Once you were apes, yet even now man is more of an ape than any of the apes.
    • Prologue 3
  • Wahrlich, ein schmutziger Strom ist der Mensch.^ Once were ye apes, and even yet man is more of an ape than any of the apes.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thy soul will be dead even sooner than thy body; fear, therefore, nothing any more!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Man muß schon ein Meer sein, um einen schmutzigen Strom aufnehmen zu können, ohne unrein zu werden.
    • Verily, a polluted stream is man.^ Verily, a polluted stream is man.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .One must be a sea to be able to receive a polluted stream without becoming unclean.
    • Prologue 3
  • Ich sage euch: man muß noch Chaos in sich haben, um einen tanzenden Stern gebären zu können.
    • I tell you: one must have chaos within oneself, to give birth to a dancing star.
    • Prologue 5
  • Kein Hirt und Eine Heerde!^ To continue one's work and to think of oneself as little as possible—that must be the first necessity.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I miss you terribly, so give me the comfort of your presence and try to make your stay not too short a one.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I must return to the cold air of the Engadine; spring attacks me unconsciously; I dare not tell you into what abysses of despair I sink under its influence.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Jeder will das Gleiche, Jeder ist gleich: wer anders fühlt, geht freiwillig in's Irrenhaus.
    • No shepherd, and one herd!^ No shepherd, and one herd!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .Everyone wants the same, everyone is the same: whoever feels different goes wilingly into the madhouse.
    • Prologue 5
  • Welches ist der große Drache, den der Geist nicht mehr Herr und Gott heißen mag?^ Everyone wanteth the same; everyone is equal: he who hath other sentiments goeth voluntarily into the madhouse.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    "Du-sollst" heißt der große Drache. Aber der Geist des Löwen sagt "ich will". "Du-sollst" liegt ihm am Wege, goldfunkelnd, ein Schuppentier, und auf jeder Schuppe glänzt golden "Du sollst!" Tausendjährige Werte glänzen an diesen Schuppen, und also spricht der mächtigste aller Drachen: "aller Wert der Dinge - der glänzt an mir." "Aller Wert ward schon geschaffen, und aller geschaffene Wert - das bin ich. Wahrlich, es soll kein 'Ich will' mehr geben!" .Also spricht der Drache.
    • Who is the great dragon whom the spirit will no longer call lord and god?^ What is the great dragon which the spirit is no longer inclined to call Lord and God?
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Its last Lord it here seeketh: hostile will it be to him, and to its last God; for victory will it struggle with the great dragon.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Of defects did the spirit of those saviours consist; but into every defect had they put their illusion, their stop-gap, which they called God.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ."Thou shalt" is the name of the great dragon.^ "Thou-shalt," is the great dragon called.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      But the spirit of the lion says, "I will." ."Thou shalt" lies in his way, sparkling like gold, an animal covered with scales; and on every scale shines a golden "thou shalt."^ "Thou-shalt," lieth in its path, sparkling with gold- a scale-covered beast; and on every scale glittereth golden, "Thou shalt!"
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ In the tower is the place for thee, thou shouldst be locked up; to one better than thyself thou blockest the way!"- And with every word he came nearer and nearer the first one.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .Values, thousands of years old, shine on these scales; and thus speaks the mightiest of all the dragons: "All value of all things shines on me.^ The values of a thousand years glitter on those scales, and thus speaketh the mightiest of all dragons: "All the values of things- glitter on me.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ All these heaviest things the load-bearing spirit taketh upon itself: and like the camel, which, when laden, hasteneth into the wilderness, so hasteneth the spirit into its wilderness.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .All value has long been created, and I am all created value.^ All values have already been created, and all created values- do I represent.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .Verily, there shall be no more 'I will.'"^ There is no need for me to give you any further assurances as to how seriously I shall pull myself together, for now a great deal depends upon it.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Now it will be seen from these letters that there was no more outspoken critic of the German Empire and its crude and superficial "Kultur" than Friedrich Nietzsche.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Possibly there are no books in the German language richer in ideas or more independent than mine.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      Thus speaks the dragon.
    • Part I, Chapter 1, "Von den drei Verwandlungen"/"On the Three Metamorphoses"
  • Keine geringe Kunst ist schlafen: es thut schon Noth, den ganzen Tag darauf hin zu wachen.
    • It is no small art to sleep: for that purpose you must keep awake all day.
    • Part I, Chapter 2, "Von den Lehrstühlen der Tugend"/"On the Teachers of Virtue"
.
I would only believe in a God that knows how to dance.
  • "Leib bin ich und Seele"–so redet das Kind.^ I should only believe in a God that would know how to dance.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But one must know how to be a sponge, if one would be loved by over-flowing hearts.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you only knew how we live here you would understand this.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Und warum sollte man nicht wie die Kinder reden?
    • "Body am I, and soul"–so says the child.^ But ye, also, my brethren, tell me: What doth your body say about your soul?
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Throughout his whole life this lonely man fought against his Fatherland and for true enlightenment: for harmony between body and soul, between peoples and races, between authorities and subjects.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "Body am I, and soul"- so saith the child.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .And why should one not speak like children?
    • Part I, Chapter 4, "Von den Verächtern des Leibes"/"On the despisers of the Body"
  • Es ist mehr Vernunft in deinem Leibe, als in deiner besten Weisheit.
    • There is more wisdom in your body than in your deepest philosophy.
    • Part I, Chapter 4, "Von den Verächtern des Leibes"/"On the despisers of the Body"
  • Und nichts Böses wächst mehr fürderhin aus dir, es sei denn das Böse, das aus dem Kampfe deiner Tugenden wächst.^ There is more sagacity in thy body than in thy best wisdom.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But of this one should not speak.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ TO THE despisers of the body will I speak my word.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Mein Bruder, wenn du Glück hast, so hast du Eine Tugend und nicht mehr: so gehst du leichter über die Brücke.
    • And nothing evil grows in you any longer, unless it is the evil that grows out of the conflict of your virtues.^ And nothing evil groweth in thee any longer, unless it be the evil that groweth out of the conflict of thy virtues.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Ye constrain all things to flow towards you and into you, so that they shall flow back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your love.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ If possible secure a terrace or flat roof, either at your lodgings or mine, where you and I will be able to sit out together, etc.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .My brother, if you are fortunate, then you will have only one virtue and no more: thus you will go more easily over the bridge.
    • Part I, Chapter 5, "Von den Freuden- und Leidenschaften"/"On Enjoying and Suffering the Passions"
  • Von allem Geschriebenen liebe ich nur Das, was Einer mit seinem Blute schreibt.
    • Of all that is written, I love only what a man has written with his own blood.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • Es ist immer etwas Wahnsinn in der Liebe.^ At you, ye virtuous ones, laughed .
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ OF ALL that is written, I love only what a person hath written with his blood.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Aren't you going to write to him?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Es ist aber immer auch etwas Vernunft im Wahnsinn.
    • There is always some madness in love.^ There is always some madness in love.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ But there is always, also, some method in madness.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The furthest ones are they who pay for your love to the near ones; and when there are but five of you together, a sixth must always die.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      But there is also always some reason in madness.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
.
Brave, unconcerned, mocking, violent – thus wisdom wants us: she is a woman, and loves only a warrior.
  • Muthig, unbekümmert, spöttisch, gewaltthätig - so will uns die Weisheit: sie ist ein Weib und liebt immer nur einen Kriegsmann.
    • Brave, unconcerned, mocking, violent–thus wisdom wants us: she is a woman, and loves only a warrior.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • Es ist wahr: wir lieben das Leben, nicht, weil wir an's Leben, sondern weil wir an's Lieben gewöhnt sind.
    • It is true: we love life not because we are used to living, but because we are used to loving.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • Ich würde nur an einen Gott glauben, der zu tanzen verstünde.
    • I would only believe in a God that knows how to dance.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • Nicht durch Zorn, sondern durch Lachen tödtet man
    • Not by wrath does one kill, but by laughter
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • Ihr seht nach oben, wenn ihr nach Erhebung verlangt.^ It is true we love life; not because we are wont to live, but because we are wont to love.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But one must know how to be a sponge, if one would be loved by over-flowing hearts.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then, perhaps, would he have learned to live, and love the earth- and laughter also!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Und ich sehe hinab, weil ich erhoben bin.
    • You look up when you wish to be exalted. .And I look down because I am exalted.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • Im Gebirge ist der nächste Weg von Gipfel zu Gipfel: aber dazu musst du lange Beine haben.^ Ye look aloft when ye long for exaltation; and I look downward because I am exalted.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Sprüche sollen Gipfel sein: und Die, zu denen gesprochen wird, Grosse und Hochwüchsige.
    • In the mountains, the shortest way is from peak to peak: but for that, you need long legs.^ In the mountains the shortest way is from peak to peak, but for that route thou must have long legs.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .Aphorisms should be peaks: and those to whom they are spoken, big and tall.
    • Part I, Chapter 7, "Vom Lesen und Schreiben"/"On Reading and Writing"
  • "Je mehr er hinauf in die Höhe und Helle will, um so stärker streben seine Wurzeln erdwärts, abwärts, in's Dunkle, Tiefe, — in's Böse."
    • The more one seeks to rise into height and light, the more vigorously do ones roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark, the deep — into evil.
    • Part I, Chapter 8, "Vom Baum am Berge"/"On the Tree on the Mountain"
  • Ihre (Predigern des Todes) Weisheit lautet: "ein Thor, der leben bleibt, aber so sehr sind wir Thoren!^ The more he seeketh to rise into the height and light, the more vigorously do his roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark and deep- into the evil."
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Proverbs should be peaks, and those spoken to should be big and tall.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I trust myself no longer since I sought to rise into the height, and nobody trusteth me any longer; how doth that happen?
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Und das eben ist das Thörichtste am Leben!" —
    .
    • Their (the preachers of death) wisdom speaks thus: "Only a fool remains alive, but such fools are we!^ Their wisdom speaketh thus: "A fool, he who remaineth alive; but so far are we fools!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Thus speak and stammer: "That is my good, that do I love, thus doth it please me entirely, thus only do I desire the good.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .And that is surely the most foolish thing about life!"
    • Part I, Chapter 9, "Von den Predigern des Todes"/"On the Preachers of Death"
  • Ich weiss um den Hass und Neid eures Herzens.^ Free for death, and free in death; a holy Naysayer, when there is no longer time for Yea: thus understandeth he about death and life.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yea, a dying for many hath here been devised, which glorifieth itself as life: verily, a hearty service unto all preachers of death!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Beneath all these simple but outlandish words lie my whole philosophy and the things about which I am most in earnest.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    Ihr seid nicht gross genug, um Hass und Neid nicht zu kennen. .So seid denn gross genug, euch ihrer nicht zu schämen!
    • I know of the hatred and envy of your hearts.^ I know the hatred and envy of your hearts.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I am writing you all this out of the heartiest depths of my heart, and know very well how very good your intentions are where I am concerned.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Ye are not great enough not to know of hatred and envy.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .You are not great enough not to know hatred and envy.^ I know the hatred and envy of your hearts.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Ye are not great enough not to know of hatred and envy.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Every two or three weeks I have to lie in bed for about thirty-six hours in great pain with the usual trouble you know so well.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Then be great enough not to be ashamed of them!
    • Part I, Chapter 10, "Vom Krieg und Kriegsvolke"/"On War and Warriors"
  • Seht sie klettern, diese geschwinden Affen!^ Then be great enough not to be ashamed of them!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Sie klettern über einander hinweg und zerren sich also in den Schlamm und die Tiefe. Hin zum Throne wollen sie Alle: ihr Wahnsinn ist es, — als ob das Glück auf dem Throne sässe! Oft sitzt der Schlamm auf dem Thron — und oft auch der Thron auf dem Schlamme. Wahnsinnige sind sie mir Alle und kletternde Affen und Überheisse. Übel riecht mir ihr Götze, das kalte Unthier: übel riechen sie mir alle zusammen, diese Götzendiener.
    • Watch them clamber, these swift monkeys! .They clamber over one another and thus drag one another into the mud and the depth.^ But they misunderstand one another.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ They clamber over one another, and thus scuffle into the mud and the abyss.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Then they always believe that one has unjustly led them into trouble; whereas success and failure often depend on accidents.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .They all want to get to the throne: that is their madness — as if happiness sat on the throne.^ Towards the throne they all strive: it is their madness- as if happiness sat on the throne!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Suffering was it, and impotence- that created all backworlds; and the short madness of happiness, which only the greatest sufferer experienceth.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Thy wild dogs want liberty; they bark for joy in their cellar when thy spirit endeavoureth to open all prison doors.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      Often, mud sits on the throne — and often the throne also on mud. .Mad they all appear to me, clambering monkeys and overardent.^ Madmen they all seem to me, and clambering apes, and too eager.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Towards the throne they all strive: it is their madness- as if happiness sat on the throne!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      Foul smells their idol, the cold monster: foul, they smell to me altogether, these idolators.
    • Part I, Chapter 11, "Vom neuen Götzen"/"On the New Idol"
When power becomes gracious and descends into the visible — such descent I call beauty. .And there is nobody from whom I want beauty as much as from you who are powerful: let your kindness be your final self-conquest.
  • Wenn die Macht gnädig wird und herabkommt ins Sichtbare: Schönheit heiße ich solches Herabkommen.^ In your love let there be valour!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All ye to whom rough labour is dear, and the rapid, new, and strange- ye put up with yourselves badly; your diligence is flight, and the will to self-forgetfulness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yea, much bitter dying must there be in your life, ye creators!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Und von niemandem will ich so als von dir gerade Schönheit, du Gewaltiger: deine Güte sei deine letzte Selbst-Überwältigung.
    • When power becomes gracious and descends into the visible — such descent I call beauty. .And there is nobody from whom I want beauty as much as from you who are powerful: let your kindness be your final self-conquest.
    • Part II, Chapter 13, "Those Who Are Sublime"
  • Zweierlei will der echte Mann: Gefahr und Spiel.^ In your love let there be valour!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One must discontinue being feasted upon when one tasteth best: that is known by those who want to be long loved.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All ye to whom rough labour is dear, and the rapid, new, and strange- ye put up with yourselves badly; your diligence is flight, and the will to self-forgetfulness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Deshalb will er das Weib als das gefährlichste Spielzeug.
    • The true man wants two things: danger and play.^ Two different things wanteth the true man: danger and diversion.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ In the true man there is a child hidden: it wanteth to play.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .For that reason he wants woman, as the most dangerous toy.
    • Chapter 18, Old and Young Women.
  • Also aber rathe ich euch, meine Freunde: misstraut Allen, in welchen der Trieb, zu strafen, mächtig ist!^ Our old god of War loved young women, not shrivelled old Muses.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then answered me the old woman: "Many fine things hath Zarathustra said, especially for those who are young enough for them.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Therefore wanteth he woman, as the most dangerous plaything.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Das ist Volk schlechter Art und Abkunft; aus ihren Gesichtern blickt der Henker und der Spürhund. Misstraut allen Denen, die viel von ihrer Gerechtigkeit reden! Wahrlich, ihren Seelen fehlt es nicht nur an Honig. .Und wenn sie sich selber 'die Guten und Gerechten' nennen, so vergesst nicht, dass ihnen zum Pharisäer Nichts fehlt als — Macht!
    • But thus do I counsel you, my friends: distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful! They are people of bad race and lineage; out of their countenances peer the hangman and the sleuth-hound.^ I have now told you all about my life as a soldier.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Oh, my darling sister, you imagine that it is all about a book ?
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ MY DEAR OLD FRIEND GERSDORFF: I have just heard of the terrible blow that has befallen you in the loss of your mother.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Distrust all those who talk much of their justice!^ I draw above all a sharp line be tween strong and weak men—those who are destined to rulership, and those who are destined to service, obedience, and devotion.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ For this part in me knows from an all too rich experience with what unrelenting coldness all those who live off the beaten track are dismissed and even dispatched .
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The sort of defensive attitude towards me taken up by all those people who were once my friends has something annoying about it which is much more mortifying than an attack.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      Verily, in their souls not only honey is lacking. .And when they call themselves 'the good and just,' forget not, that for them to be Pharisees, nothing is lacking but — power!^ And if ever I complain the whole world thinks it is entitled to exercise its modicum of power over me as a sufferer—they call it consolation, pity, good advice, etc.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Incidentally I have just called to mind a recent experience that offers a very good illustration of the scholar's morbid symptoms.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .(Thomas Common translation)
    • Variant translation: But thus I counsel you, my friends: Mistrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful. They are people of a low sort and stock; the hangman and the bloodhound look out of their faces.^ I have now told you all about my life as a soldier.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Power they seek for, and above all, the lever of power, much money- these impotent ones!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Oh, my darling sister, you imagine that it is all about a book ?
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      Mistrust all who talk much of their justice! .Verily, their souls lack more than honey.^ Thy soul will be dead even sooner than thy body; fear, therefore, nothing any more!"
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Verily, dear friend, that is more than a philological prize, although I am not insensible even to the kind of encomiums that the Faculty of Leipzig thought fit to bestow upon me.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .And when they call themselves the good and the just, do not forget that they would be pharisees, if only they had — power.
    • Ch.29, The Tarantulas (Similar statements are attributed to Goethe, and to Dostoevsky)
  • Und wer von uns Dichtern hätte nicht seinen Wein verfälscht?^ Herdsmen, I say, but they call themselves the good and just.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As yet had he known only tears, and the melancholy of the Hebrews, together with the hatred of the good and just- the Hebrew Jesus: then was he seized with the longing for death.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is laudable, what they think hard; what is indispensable and hard they call good; and what relieveth in the direst distress, the unique and hardest of all,- they extol as holy.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Manch giftiger Mischmasch geschah in unsern Kellern, manches Unbeschreibliche ward da getan.
    • And who among us poets has not adulterated his wine? .Many a poisonous hodgepodge has been contrived in our cellars; much that is indescribable was accomplished there.
    • Part II, Chapter 39, On Poets
  • Ach, es gibt so viel Dinge zwischen Himmel und Erde, von denen sich nur die Dichter etwas haben träumen lassen.^ Even among them there are heroes; many of them have suffered too much:- so they want to make others suffer.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Und zumal ü b e r dem Himmel: denn alle Götter sind Dichter-Gleichnis, Dichter-Erschleichnis! Wahrlich, immer zieht es uns hinan - nämlich zum Reich der Wolken: auf diese setzen wir unsre bunten Bälge und heißen sie dann Götter und Übermenschen: - Sind sie doch gerade leicht genug für diese Stühle! - alle diese Götter und Übermenschen. Ach, wie bin ich all des Unzulänglichen müde, das durchaus Ereignis sein soll! .Ach, wie bin ich der Dichter müde!
    • Alas, there are so many things between heaven and earth of which only the poets have dreamed.^ Many heavy things are there for the spirit, the strong load-bearing spirit in which reverence dwelleth: for the heavy and the heaviest longeth its strength.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ No words of anger have ever passed between us, not even in my dreams—on the contrary, only words of encouragement and good cheer, and with no one have I ever laughed so much as with him.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .And especially above the heavens: for all gods are poets' parables, poets' prevarications.
      Verily, it always lifts us higher — specifically, to the realm of the clouds: upon these we place our motley bastards and call them gods and overmen.^ All these heaviest things the load-bearing spirit taketh upon itself: and like the camel, which, when laden, hasteneth into the wilderness, so hasteneth the spirit into its wilderness.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "Dead are all the Gods: now do we desire the Superman to live."- Let this be our final will at the great noontide!- .
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Marriage they call it all; and they say their marriages are made in heaven.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .For they are just light enough for these chairs — all these gods and overmen.^ Power they seek for, and above all, the lever of power, much money- these impotent ones!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Badly smelleth their idol to me, the cold monster: badly they all smell to me, these idolaters.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ To all those belauded sages of the academic chairs, wisdom was sleep without dreams: they knew no higher significance of life.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .Ah, how weary I am of all the imperfection which must at all costs become event!^ But I am really heartily tired of all this cleverness and must become absorbed in myself.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Ready must thou be to burn thyself in thine own flame; how couldst thou become new if thou have not first become ashes!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ But you at all events must go to Bayreuth.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Ah, how weary I am of poets!
    • Part II, Chapter 39, On Poets
  • Höheres als alle Versöhnung muss der Wille wollen, welcher der Wille zur Macht ist.^ On my table there lies the new edition (in two volumes) of "Human-all-too-Human," the first part of which I worked out then—how strange!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Higher than all reconciliation must the Will will, which the will to power is.
    • Part II, Chapter 42: Redemption
It is the stillest words that bring on the storm. Thoughts that come on doves' feet guide the world.
  • Und wer unter Menschen nicht verschmachten will, muß lernen, aus allen Gläsern zu trinken; und wer unter Menschen rein bleiben will, muß verstehn, sich auch mit schmutzigem Wasser zu waschen. Und also sprach ich oft mir zum Troste: "Wohlan! Wohlauf! Altes Herz! .Ein Unglück mißriet dir: genieße dies als dein - Glück!"
    • And whoever does not want to die of thirst among men must learn to drink out of all cups; and whoever would stay clean among men must know how to wash even with dirty water. And thus I often comforted myself, "Well then, old heart!^ Shall I tell you all about myself—how every day I set out two hours before the sun rises on the hills and after that take my walks only among the lengthening shadows of the afternoon and evening?
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ On my table there lies the new edition (in two volumes) of "Human-all-too-Human," the first part of which I worked out then—how strange!
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Read it right through again so that in it you may recognize yourself as retoucheur (as well as myself ; for, after all, I too, went to some pains in producing it).
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      One misfortune failed you; enjoy this as your good fortune."
    • Part II, Chapter 43, On Human Prudence
  • Die stillsten Worte sind es, welche den Sturm bringen. Gedanken, die mit Taubenfüßen kommen, lenken die Welt.
    • It is the stillest words that bring on the storm. Thoughts that come on doves' feet guide the world.
    • Part II, Chapter 44, The Stillest Hour
  • Woher kommen die höchsten Berge? so fragte ich einst. Da lernte ich, daß sie aus dem Meere kommen. Dies Zeugnis ist in ihr Gestein geschrieben und in die Wände ihrer Gipfel. Aus dem Tiefsten muß das Höchste zu seiner Höhe kommen.
    • Whence come the highest mountains? I once asked. .Then I learned that they came out of the sea.^ Once did people say God, when they looked out upon distant seas; now, however, have I taught you to say, Superman.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      The evidence is written in their rocks and in the walls of their peaks. .It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height.
    • Part III, Chapter 45, The Wanderer
  • O meine Brüder, ich weihe und weise euch zu einem neuen Adel: ihr sollt mir Zeuger und Züchter werden und Säemänner der Zukunft, - wahrlich, nicht zu einem Adel, den ihr kaufen könntet gleich den Krämern und mit Krämer-Golde: denn wenig Wert hat alles, was seinen Preis hat.^ Provided that I am not led entirely astray in my course, or that my health does not break down, something must certainly come of all this.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am writing you all this out of the heartiest depths of my heart, and know very well how very good your intentions are where I am concerned.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    Nicht, woher ihr kommt, mache euch fürderhin eure Ehre, sondern wohin ihr geht! .Euer Wille und euer Fuß, der über euch selber hinaus will, — das mache eure neue Ehre!
    • O my brothers, I dedicate and direct you to a new nobility: you shall become procreators and cultivators and sowers of the future — verily, not to a nobility that you might buy like shopkeepers and with shopkeepers' gold: for whatever has its price has little value.^ And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Well, yes, dearest friend, I should rejoice at receiving something really personal from you once more if only not always to have the Rohde of the past in my heart, but also the Rohde of the present and, what is more, the Rohde who is developing and willing—yes, the Rohde of the future.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Above all I am delighted to hear that you are sure to come in the autumn, but you have formed an exaggerated opinion of the all too modest space at my disposal in my new quarters if you think I shall be able to put you both up.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Not whence you came shall henceforth constitute your honor, but whither you are going!^ Ye constrain all things to flow towards you and into you, so that they shall flow back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your love.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Your highest thought, however, ye shall have it commanded unto you by me- and it is this: man is something that is to be surpassed.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ With your love shall ye assail him who inspireth you with fear!
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .Your will and your foot which has a will to go over and beyond yourselves — that shall constitute your new honor.
    • Part III, Chapter 56, On Old and New Tablets(12)
  • O meine Brüder, nicht zurück soll euer Adel schauen, sondern h i n a u s !^ All ye to whom rough labour is dear, and the rapid, new, and strange- ye put up with yourselves badly; your diligence is flight, and the will to self-forgetfulness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Your slaying, ye judges, shall be pity, and not revenge; and in that ye slay, see to it that ye yourselves justify life!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Beyond yourselves shall ye love some day!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Vertriebene sollt ihr sein aus allen Vater- und Urväterländern! Eurer Kinder Land sollt ihr lieben: diese Liebe sei euer neuer Adel, — das unentdeckte, im fernsten Meere! Nach ihm heiße ich eure Segel suchen und suchen! An euren Kindern sollt ihr gut machen, daß ihr eurer Väter Kinder seid: alles Vergangene sollt ihr so erlösen! .Diese neue Tafel stelle ich über euch!
    • O my brothers, your nobility should not look backward but ahead! Exiles shall you be from all father- and forefather-lands!^ Above all that you should have finished !
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Found you while on a genealogy search for my brother in law - looking for ...

      ^ I have now told you all about my life as a soldier.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Your children's land shall you love: this love shall be your new nobility — the undiscovered land in the most distant sea.^ And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And now farewell, and may you cross the threshold of your new year of life the same man as you have always been.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ They call you heartless: but your heart is true, and I love the bashfulness of your goodwill.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      For that I bid your sails search and search. .In your children you shall make up for being the children of your fathers: thus shall you redeem all that is past.^ And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ All ye to whom rough labour is dear, and the rapid, new, and strange- ye put up with yourselves badly; your diligence is flight, and the will to self-forgetfulness.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Above all I am delighted to hear that you are sure to come in the autumn, but you have formed an exaggerated opinion of the all too modest space at my disposal in my new quarters if you think I shall be able to put you both up.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      This new tablet I place over you.
    • Part III, Chapter 56, On Old and New Tablets(12)
  • Free from what? As if that mattered to Zarathustra! .But your eyes should tell me brightly: free for what?^ Your art requires that you should be free from worry ; is that not so, my dear friend?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Part I, On the Way of the Creator
  • Then will he who goes under bless himself for being one who goes over and beyond; and the sun of his knowledge will stand at high noon for him.
."Dead are all gods: now we want the overman to live" — on that great noon, let this be our last will.^ "Dead are all the Gods: now do we desire the Superman to live."- Let this be our final will at the great noontide!- .
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Let us beware of awakening those dead ones, and of damaging those living coffins!
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ And now let us banish all care from our brow and chat pleasantly for a while.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Part I, On the Gift-Giving Virtue, 3

On the Genealogy of Morality (1887)

Also translated as Genealogy of Morals
.
  • There still shines the most important nuance by virtue of which the noble felt themselves to be men of a higher rank.^ Higher than love to your neighbour is love to the furthest and future ones; higher still than love to men, is love to things and phantoms.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And even if one have all the virtues, there is still one thing needful: to send the virtues themselves to sleep at the right time.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In your dying shall your spirit and your virtue still shine like an evening after-glow around the earth: otherwise your dying hath been unsatisfactory.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .They designate themselves simply by their superiority in power (as "the powerful," "the masters," "the commanders") or by the most clearly visible signs of this superiority, for example, as "the rich," "the possessors" (this is the meaning of 'Arya,' and of corresponding words in Iranian and Slavic).^ This is by no means a sign of a "cold nature": but you, of course, understand that, my most dear and faithful friend!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Too well, also, do I know what they themselves most believe in.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Essay 1, Section 5
  • As is well known, the priests are the most evil enemies — but why?^ "Beyond Good and Evil" was never known to Spitteler, that is why it is not mentioned in his review.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    Because they are the most impotent. .It is because of their impotence that in them hatred grows to monstrous and uncanny proportions, to the most spiritual and poisonous kind of hatred. The truly great haters in the world history have always been priests; likewise the most ingenious haters: other kinds of spirit hardly come into consideration when compared with the spirit of priestly vengefulness.^ A mass of diseases that reach out into the world through the spirit; there they want to get their prey.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It does come out in this correspondence, which, it may be safely predicted, will mark the end of the "moral" crusade against one of the world's purest spirits.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Essay 1, Section 7
  • While every noble morality develops from a triumphant affirmation of itself, slave morality from the outset says No to what is "outside," what is "different," what is "not itself"; and this No is its creative deed.
    • Essay 1, Section 10
  • Without cruelty there is no festival: thus the longest and most ancient part of human history teaches — and in punishment there is so much that is festive!^ There is no salvation for him who thus suffereth from himself, unless it be speedy death.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Free for death, and free in death; a holy Naysayer, when there is no longer time for Yea: thus understandeth he about death and life.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ On my table there lies the new edition (in two volumes) of "Human-all-too-Human," the first part of which I worked out then—how strange!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Essay 2, Section 6
  • That every will must consider every other will its equal — would be a principle hostile to life, an agent of the dissolution and destruction of man, an attempt to assassinate the future of man, a sign of weariness, a secret path to nothingness.
    • Essay 2, Section 11
  • It is possible to imagine a society flushed with such a sense of power that it could afford to let its offenders go unpunished.^ "And would my powerful longings, all in vain Charm into life that deathless form again—" [45] —as Faust says of Helen?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Every winter now I intend to write just such an essay for myself ,—the thought of getting it published is practically out of the question.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now let me tell you something about my Jupiter, Richard Wagner, to whom I go from time to time for a breath of air, and receive more refreshment by so doing than any of my colleagues could possibly imagine.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Essay 2, Section 11
.
A strong and well-constituted man digests his experiences (deeds and misdeeds all included) just as he digests his meats, even when he has some tough morsels to swallow.
  • The broad effects which can be obtained by punishment in man and beast are the increase of fear, the sharpening of the sense of cunning, the mastery of the desires; so it is that punishment tames man, but does not make him "better."^ In my opinion all modern music seems to be suffering from an ever increasing atrophy of the sense of melody.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am well aware that this vir bonus in the best sense meant even more to you; that, as you often used to tell me in the past, he constituted the ideal to which you aspired, your fixed guiding star amid all the tortuous and difficult highways and byways of life.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nevertheless I agree with him in many respects, particularly when he says he regards Wagner as the representative of a modern dilettantism which is sucking up and digesting all art interests.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Essay 2, Section 15
  • All instincts that do not discharge themselves outwardly turn inward — this is what I call the internalization of man: thus it was that man first developed what was later called his "soul."^ The state, I call it, where all are poison-drinkers, the good and the bad: the state, where all lose themselves, the good and the bad: the state, where the slow suicide of all- is called "life."
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus, once on a time, did I also cast my fancy beyond man, like all backworldsmen.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Later on , of course, you will be a rich man, but the thing which is all important now is that you should be spared the care of this "later on."
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Essay 2, Section 16
  • The advent of the Christian God, as the maximum god attained so far, was therefore accompanied by the maximum feeling of guilty indebtedness on earth.
    • Essay 2, Section 21
  • The sick are the greatest danger for the healthy; it is not from the strongest that harm comes to the strong, but from the weakest.
    • Essay 3, Aphorism 14
  • A strong and well-constituted man digests his experiences (deeds and misdeeds all included) just as he digests his meats, even when he has some tough morsels to swallow.
    • Essay 3, Aphorism 16

Twilight of the Idols (1888)

Götzen-Dämmerung (1888)
.
Without music, life would be a mistake.
  • Plato ist langweilig
    • Plato is boring.^ And how would ye endure life without that hope, ye discerning ones?
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Think what life would be like without a friend!
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      • What I Owe to the Ancients, 2
  • What is it: is man only a blunder of God, or God only a blunder of man?
    • Maxims and Arrows, 7
  • Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker.
    • What does not destroy me, makes me stronger.
      • Maxims and Arrows, 8
  • Women are considered profound. Why? Because we never fathom their depths. But women aren't even shallow. .
    • Maxims and Arrows, 27
  • Ohne Musik wäre das Leben ein Irrtum.
    • Without music, life would be a mistake.
      • Maxims and Arrows, 33
  • Das Christenthum ist eine Metaphysik des Henkers...
    • Christianity is a metaphysics of the hangman...^ And how would ye endure life without that hope, ye discerning ones?
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Think what life would be like without a friend!
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      • The Four Great Errors, Section 7
  • Two great European narcotics, alcohol and Christianity.
    • What the Germans lack, 2; also in The Antichrist, Sec. 60, and Gay Science, Sec. 147
  • My conception of freedom. — .The value of a thing sometimes does not lie in that which one attains by it, but in what one pays for it — what it costs us. I give an example.^ Or is it this: To love those who despise us, and give one's hand to the phantom when it is going to frighten us?
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One learns a tremendous lot in one term, even in the realm of material things; but it is a pity that one has to pay so dearly for these lessons.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is always a good thing, if one does not wish to become too one-sided, to be educated in different places.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Liberal institutions cease to be liberal as soon as they are attained: later on, there are no worse and no more thorough injurers of freedom than liberal institutions. One knows, indeed, what their ways bring: they undermine the will to power; they level mountain and valley, and call that morality; they make men small, cowardly, and hedonistic [genüsslich] — every time it is the herd animal that triumphs with them.^ (Schiess thinks they are worse than they were some time ago.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No shepherd, and one herd!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Verily, there shall be no 'I will' any more.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Liberalism: in other words, herd-animalization ...
    • Variant translation: Liberal institutions straightway cease from being liberal the moment they are soundly established: once this is attained no more grievous and more thorough enemies of freedom exist than liberal institutions.
    • Expeditions of an Untimely Man, 38
We have already gone beyond whatever we have words for. .In all talk there is a grain of contempt.
  • It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what everyone else says in a whole book — what everyone else does not say in a whole book.
    • Things the Germans Lack, 51
  • The doctrine of equality!^ There s the whole thing!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "And would my powerful longings, all in vain Charm into life that deathless form again—" [45] —as Faust says of Helen?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I should prefer above all to return to Sorrento once more ( δίς καί τοίς τὸ καλόν say the Greeks: "all good things twice or thrice!"
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    … But there is no more venomous poison in existence: for it appears to be preached by justice itself, when it is actually the end of justice … "Equality to the equal; inequality to the unequal" — that would be true justice speaking: and its corollary, "never make the unequal equal".
    • Die Lehre von der Gleichheit! ... Aber es giebt gar kein giftigeres Gift: denn sie scheint von der Gerechtigkeit selbst gepredigt, während sie das Ende der Gerechtigkeit ist... "Den Gleichen Gleiches, den Ungleichen Ungleiches - das wäre die wahre Rede der Gerechtigkeit: und, was daraus folgt, Ungleiches niemals gleich machen."
    • Expeditions of an Untimely Man, §48 Progress in my sense (Streifzüge eines Unzeitgemässen §48 Fortschritt in meinem Sinne). .Chapter title also translated as: Skirmishes of an Untimely Man, Kaufmann/Hollingdale translation, and Raids of an Untimely Man, Richard Polt translation
  • When one gives up Christian belief one thereby deprives oneself of the right to Christian morality.^ I hope shortly to be able to give you an account of my experiences in person, and I am also bringing you one or two chassepot bullets picked up on the battlefields.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nobler is it to own oneself in the wrong than to establish one's right, especially if one be in the right.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Also to the good, a noble one standeth in the way: and even when they call him a good man, they want thereby to put him aside.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .For the latter is absolutely not self-evident: one must make this point clear again and again, in spite of English shallowpates.^ The fact, therefore, that I must destroy some of these interests is perfectly clear to me, as well as the fact that I must allow some new ones to find a home in my brain.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Expeditions of an Untimely Man §5
  • We have already gone beyond whatever we have words for. .In all talk there is a grain of contempt.
    • Expeditions of an Untimely Man §26.
    • Wofür wir Worte haben, darüber sind wir auch schon hinaus.^ "Not at all," said Zarathustra, "thou hast made danger thy calling; therein there is nothing contemptible.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      In allem Reden liegt ein Gran Verachtung.
    • Variant translation: That for which we find words is something already dead in our hearts. .There is always a kind of contempt in the act of speaking.'
  • These same institutions produce quite different effects while they are still being fought for; then they really promote freedom in a powerful way.^ As far as my health is concerned, things are not so good as I really supposed they would be when I effected the complete change in my mode of life here.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All I long for is a little freedom, a taste of the real breath of life; and I kick, I revolt against the many, the unutterably many constraints to which my mind is still subject.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After Luther and Goethe there still remained a third step to be taken—just ask yourself, dear old comrade, whether power, suppleness, and euphony have ever before been united in this way in our language.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    On closer inspection it is war that produces these effects, the war for liberal institutions, which, as a war, permits illiberal instincts to continue. And war educates for freedom. For what is freedom? That one has the will to self-responsibility. That one maintains the distance which separates us. .That one becomes more indifferent to difficulties, hardships, privation, even to life itself.^ Life then becomes a matter of not losing one's thirst for oneself and also of not drinking oneself dry.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Its editor and contributors acquired the nickname of Gesunden (healthy ones) owing to their attitude of indifference to the more subtle manifestations of imaginative genius.—Translator.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Greek philosophers seem to me ever more and more to represent the paragon of what one should aim at in our mode of life.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .That one is prepared to sacrifice human beings for one's cause, not excluding oneself.
  • Freedom means that the manly instincts which delight in war and victory dominate over other instincts, for example, over those of "pleasure."^ One must discontinue being feasted upon when one tasteth best: that is known by those who want to be long loved.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Today I had the pleasure of being proved in the right over a question, which, in itself, might seem extraordinarily daring: to wit—what man up to the present has been the best prepared for Wagner?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Too well do I know those godlike ones: they insist on being believed in, and that doubt is sin.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .The human being who has become free — and how much more the spirit who has become free — spits on the contemptible type of well-being dreamed of by shopkeepers, Christians, cows, females, Englishmen, and other democrats.^ It is possible I wish to become more of a free spirit than I am capable of becoming.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Oh, how much that wishes to become word and form still lies concealed within me!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    The free man is a warrior. —
  • How is freedom measured, in individuals as in nations? By the resistance which must be overcome, by the effort [Mühe] it costs to remain on top. The highest type of free men should be sought where the highest resistance is constantly overcome: five steps from tyranny, close to the threshold of the danger of servitude. .This is true psychologically if by "tyrants" are meant inexorable and dreadful instincts that provoke the maximum of authority and discipline against themselves — most beautiful type: Julius Caesar — ; this is true politically too; one need only go through history.^ But beauty's voice speaketh gently: it appealeth only to the most awakened souls.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But if I knew you only by this one remark of yours about Taine I believe that, owing to the lack of instinct and tact it reveals, I should thoroughly despise you.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And yet it has a balcony from which one can enjoy a most beautiful view.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The nations which were worth something, became worth something, never became so under liberal institutions: it was great danger that made something of them that merits respect.^ Something must be discovered and thought out by means of which the next few years may be made secure and no longer full of dangerous accidents.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Danger alone acquaints us with our own resources, our virtues, our armor and weapons, our spirit — and forces us to be strong ...
  • First principle: one must need to be strong — otherwise one will never become strong.^ Then hast thou its name in common with the people, and hast become one of the people and the herd with thy virtue!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of course, we must take care that we ourselves do not become too deeply influenced during the process of our research; for habit exercises a prodigious power.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They would fain crucify those who devise their own virtue- they hate the lonesome ones.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    — Those large hothouses [Treibhäuser] for the strong, for the strongest kind of human being that has ever been, the aristocratic commonwealths of the type of Rome or Venice, understood freedom exactly in the sense in which I understand the word freedom: as something one has and does not have, something one wants, something one conquers ...

The Antichrist (1888)

The very word "Christianity" is a misunderstanding — in truth, there was only one Christian, and he died on the cross.
Der Antichrist (1888); The Antichrist (English translation at WIkisource) (German) ; for more quotes from this work see The Antichrist
  • Einige werden posthum geboren.
    • Some are born posthumously.
      • Foreword.
  • What is good? .All that heightens the feeling of power in man, the will to power, power itself.^ To grow old and to grow solitary seem to be synonymous, and at last a man is all alone and makes others feel lonely by his death.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    What is bad? All that is born of weakness. What is happiness? The feeling that power is growing, that resistance is overcome.
    • Sec. .2
  • In Christianity neither morality nor religion come into contact with reality at any point.^ It really is too ludicrous; first the Christian obstruction, the 500,000 hymn books, and now the anti-Semitic obstruction these are truly experiences for the founder of a religion.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .16
  • Love is a state in which a man sees things most decidedly as they are not.^ Ye constrain all things to flow towards you and into you, so that they shall flow back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your love.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Verily, not in backworlds and redeeming blood-drops: but in the body do they also believe most; and their own body is for them the thing-in-itself.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The things most urgently needed in Germany at present are precisely independent Educational Institutions, which would actively compete with the slave-drilling education of the State .
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .23
  • ...to the priestly class -- decadence is no more than a means to an end.^ Ye shall love peace as a means to new wars- and the short peace more than the long.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If, however, thou wilt give unto them, give them no more than an alms, and let them also beg for it!"
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What I mean by luck in this connection is no more than the absence of such strokes of ill fortune as that of last year—that is to say, that no other stones should enter the works of my watch.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Men of this sort have a vital interest in making mankind sick, and in confusing the values of "good" and "bad," "true" and "false" in a manner that is not only dangerous to life, but also slanders it.^ The state, I call it, where all are poison-drinkers, the good and the bad: the state, where all lose themselves, the good and the bad: the state, where the slow suicide of all- is called "life."
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nevertheless I was content to bear with the Association, not only because it taught me a good deal, but also because I was, on the whole, compelled to acknowledge the intellectual life which formed a part of it.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Verily, men have given unto themselves all their good and bad.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .24
  • The very word "Christianity" is a misunderstanding — in truth, there was only one Christian, and he died on the cross.
    • This has commonly been paraphrased: The last Christian died on the cross.
    • Sec.^ Verily, there are chaste ones from their very nature; they are gentler of heart, and laugh better and oftener than you.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Only the fetter for the thousand necks is still lacking; there is lacking the one goal.
      • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ No words of anger have ever passed between us, not even in my dreams—on the contrary, only words of encouragement and good cheer, and with no one have I ever laughed so much as with him.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      39
  • As an artistic triumph in psychological corruption ... the Gospels, in fact, stand alone ... .Here we are among Jews: this is the first thing to be borne in mind if we are not to lose the thread of the matter.^ Here in our land of sunshine what different things we have in mind!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This positive genius for conjuring up a delusion of personal "holiness" unmatched anywhere else, either in books or by men; this elevation of fraud in word and attitude to the level of an art — all this is not an accident due to the chance talents of an individual, or to any violation of nature.^ It is a funny thing that in spite of one's best intentions for the general weal one's own paltry personality with all its wretchedness and weakness comes and trips one up.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nevertheless I agree with him in many respects, particularly when he says he regards Wagner as the representative of a modern dilettantism which is sucking up and digesting all art interests.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You can take my word for it, that for men like me, a marriage after the type of Goethe's would be the best of all—that is to say, a marriage with a good housekeeper!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    The thing responsible is race.
    • Sec. .44
  • The whole disaster was only made possible by the fact that there already existed in the world a similar megalomania, allied to this one in race, to wit, the Jewish.^ Go to Bayreuth in the summer and you will find the whole theatrical world of Germany assembled there, even Prince Lichtenstein, etc., etc., Levi, [73] too.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Was I made for solitude or for a life in which there was no one to whom I could speak?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our lives, our work, and our enjoyment will then be for one another; possibly this is the only way in which we can work for the world as a whole.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 44
  • What follows, then? That one had better put on gloves before reading the New Testament. The presence of so much filth makes it very advisable. .One would as little choose early Christians for companions as Polish Jews: not that one need seek out an objection to them — neither has a pleasant smell.^ By-the-bye, a little while ago I sent him one or two passages out of your letters for Frau von Bülow, who had often asked me for them.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Would that ye could not endure it with any kind of near ones, or their neighbours; then would ye have to create your friend and his overflowing heart out of yourselves.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One evening I got an undeniable proof of this, in the form of a little piece of bone which came out of the wound with the matter.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 46
.
Against boredom even gods struggle in vain.
  • The God that Paul invented for himself, a God who "reduced to absurdity" "the wisdom of this world" (especially the two great enemies of superstition, philology and medicine), is in truth only an indication of Paul's resolute determination to accomplish that very thing himself: to give one's own will the name of God, Torah — that is essentially Jewish.^ How can I give every one his own!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Verily, he believeth only in gods that make a great noise in the world!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is a funny thing that in spite of one's best intentions for the general weal one's own paltry personality with all its wretchedness and weakness comes and trips one up.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 47'
  • God created woman. And boredom did indeed cease from that moment — but many other things ceased as well! Woman was God's second mistake.
    • Sec. 48
  • Against boredom even gods struggle in vain.
    • Sec. .48
  • That faith makes blessed under certain circumstances, that blessedness does not make of a fixed idea a true idea, that faith moves no mountains but puts mountains where there are none: a quick walk through a madhouse enlightens one sufficiently about this.^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are the terrible ones who carry about in themselves the beast of prey, and have no choice except lusts or self-laceration.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Evil do I call it and misanthropic: all that teaching about the one, and the plenum, and the unmoved, and the sufficient, and the imperishable!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .51; Often paraphrased as: "A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything."
  • "Faith" means not wanting to know what is true.^ If the poet [57] be not a true genius then I do not know what genius means.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 52
  • Nihilist und Christ: das reimt sich, das reimt sich nicht bloss.
    • Nihilist and Christian. They rhyme, and do not merely rhyme...
    • Sec. 58, as translated by R. J. Hollingdale. .In German these words do rhyme; variant translation: Nihilist and Christian.^ These words are a quotation from a well-known poem of Schiller's conveying the idea of a jolly fellow being alone amongst a lot of wooden creatures.—Translator.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      .They rhyme, and they do indeed do more than just rhyme.
  • Christianity destroyed for us the whole harvest of ancient civilization, and later it also destroyed for us the whole harvest of Mohammedan civilization.^ And just as at night, when they are in bed and hear a man abroad long before sunrise, so they ask themselves concerning us: Where goeth the thief?
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Bad enemies are they: nothing is more revengeful than their meekness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I believe that just as my work makes a stronger and more discomfiting impression upon you than upon anyone else, so everything that proceeds from you has a more soothing effect upon me than upon anyone else.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The wonderful culture of the Moors in Spain, which was fundamentally nearer to us and appealed more to our senses and tastes than that of Rome and Greece, was trampled down (—I do not say by what sort of feet—) Why?^ The curtain falls on our past when our mother dies; it is then for the first time that our childhood and youth be come nothing more than a memory.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our experiences have been somewhat similar; but you have this advantage over me—a better temperament, a better, calmer, and more lonely past—and better health than I have.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With regard to what you so kindly said to me at the last moment, I wonder whether it might not prove both refreshing and fruitful for us both once more to join our two solitudes in closest and heartiest proximity!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    Because it had to thank noble and manly instincts for its origin—because it said yes to life, even to the rare and refined luxuriousness of Moorish life! .The crusaders later made war on something before which it would have been more fitting for them to have grovelled in the dust—a civilization beside which even that of our nineteenth century seems very poor and very "senile."[...] Intrinsically there should be no more choice between Islam and Christianity than there is between an Arab and a Jew.^ Verily, there shall be no 'I will' any more.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Quite seriously, I believe, that Zarathustra turned out to be more cheerful and happier than he would otherwise have been.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Verily, there are chaste ones from their very nature; they are gentler of heart, and laugh better and oftener than you.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    The decision is already reached; nobody remains at liberty to choose here. Either a man is a Chandala or he is not.... “War to the knife with Rome! .Peace and friendship with Islam!”: this was the feeling, this was the act, of that great free spirit, that genius among German emperors, Frederick II.^ Jacob Burckhardt [43] gave a free lecture on "Historical Greatness," which was quite in keeping with our thought and feeling.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .60
  • I call Christianity the one great curse, the one great intrinsic depravity, the one great instinct for revenge for which no expedient is sufficiently poisonous, secret, subterranean, petty — I call it the one immortal blemish of mankind.^ I always imagine Rome of the Christian Councils as a terribly poisonous place—no, I shall not write any more; for I have a feeling that the secrecy of a letter is not sufficiently secure for the discussion of ecclesiastical and Jesuitical matters.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Evil do I call it and misanthropic: all that teaching about the one, and the plenum, and the unmoved, and the sufficient, and the imperishable!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To be sure, ye say: "The delight in petty evils spareth one many a great evil deed."
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 62

Ecce Homo (1888)

"Ecce Homo" (Behold the Man) indicates the phrase Pontius Pilate used in presenting Jesus to the crowd after his scourging.
.
One must pay dearly for immortality; one has to die several times while still alive.
  • Der Mensch der Erkenntniss muss nicht nur seine Feinde lieben, er muss auch seine Freunde hassen können.
    • The knight of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies, but also to hate his friends.
      • Foreword, in the Oscar Levy authorized translation.
    • Variant translations:
    • The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends.
  • Nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly than the passion of resentment.
  • One must pay dearly for immortality; one has to die several times while still alive.
  • I know my fate.^ In one's friend one shall have one's best enemy.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Bad enemies are they: nothing is more revengeful than their meekness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One can die with it—this is much more than saying that one can live with it.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .One day my name will be associated with the memory of something tremendous — a crisis without equal on earth, the most profound collision of conscience, a decision that was conjured up against everything that had been believed, demanded, hallowed so far.^ Believe me, my friends: the sting of conscience teacheth one to sting.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is really intended to be sung "to my memory" one day.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The old flood for the sins of Europe is still too much for me; but perhaps some one may yet come to my rescue and help me up to the highlands of Mexico.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I am no man, I am dynamite.
    • "Why I am a Destiny", 1
  • was ihn nicht umbringt, macht ihn stärker
    • What does not kill him, makes him stronger.
    • "Why I Am So Wise", 2; this is often paraphrased as: What does not kill me, makes me stronger.
  • All things considered, I could never have survived my youth without Wagnerian music.^ It was all right, the man had my things.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why does no one ever look at me with such eyes?
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    For I seemed condemned to the society of Germans. If a man wishes to rid himself of a feeling of unbearable oppression, he may have to take to hashish. Well, I had to take to Wagner...
    • Why I am So Clever, 6. Trans. .Clifton P. Fadiman.
  • To become what one is, one must not have the faintest idea what one is.^ One must be a sea, to receive a polluted stream without becoming impure.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Why I am So Clever, 9

The Will to Power (1888)

.Der Wille zur Macht (1888) has been called a "historic forgery" artificially assembled by Nietzsche's sister" who was a well known Nazi sympathizer.^ I rejoice over this fact because in it I find the racial peculiarity of those who call themselves Nietzsche, and I possess it myself.
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Yours, NIETZSCHE. [ edit ] Nietzsche To His Sister - January, 1888 .
  • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

It was published after Nietzsche's death and portions with seemingly racist and nationalist overtones have been attributed to his sister's beliefs, not Nietzsche's. .See also "Thus Spake Elisabeth" in The Weekly Standard (13 March 2004).^ The saint laughed at Zarathustra, and spake thus: "Then see to it that they accept thy treasures!
  • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

  • This is the antinomy: Insofar as we believe in morality we pass sentence on existence.
    • Sec. .6
  • Moralities and religions are the principal means by which one can make whatever one wishes out of man, provided one possesses a superfluity of creative forces and can assert one's will over long periods of time — in the form of legislation, religions, and customs.^ One evening I got an undeniable proof of this, in the form of a little piece of bone which came out of the wound with the matter.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have no greater wish than to be allowed sufficient time to mature properly and then out of my plenitude produce something.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Not long ago I had occasion to speak to a man who was on the point of going out to India as a missionary.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .144
  • A man as he ought to be: that sounds to us as insipid as "a tree as it ought to be."^ To feel alike about Chamfort too ought to be a point of honour for us both; he was a man of the stamp of Mirabeau in character, heart, and magnanimity; this was Mirabeau's own opinion of his friend.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. .332
  • To those human beings who are of any concern to me I wish suffering, desolation, sickness, ill-treatment, indignities - I wish that they should not remain unfamiliar with profound self-contempt, the torture of self-mistrust, the wretchedness of the vanquished: I have no pity for them, because I wish them the only thing that can prove today whether one is worth anything or not - that one endures.^ But here one should not wish to be sparing.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But these are studies which, for the time being only, concern me.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And, moreover, it would no longer be possible, because no man would join these colours voluntarily, colours with which the idea of the "one-year volunteer" cannot be associated at all.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Sec 481
  • The stronger becomes master of the weaker, in so far as the latter cannot assert its degree of independence — here there is no mercy, no forbearance, even less a respect for "laws."^ Possibly there are no books in the German language richer in ideas or more independent than mine.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When ye despise pleasant things, and the effeminate couch, and cannot couch far enough from the effeminate: there is the origin of your virtue.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is no need for me to speak to anyone; no one knows me; I am absolutely alone and could stay here for weeks, sitting and walking about.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 630
  • Morality is: the mediocre are worth more than the exceptions ... I abhore Christianity with a deadly hatred.
    • Sec. .685
  • The states in which we infuse a transfiguration and a fullness into things and poetize about them until they reflect back our fullness and joy in life...three elements principally: sexuality, intoxication and cruelty — all belonging to the oldest festal joys.^ All these heaviest things the load-bearing spirit taketh upon itself: and like the camel, which, when laden, hasteneth into the wilderness, so hasteneth the spirit into its wilderness.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ye constrain all things to flow towards you and into you, so that they shall flow back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your love.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Beneath all these simple but outlandish words lie my whole philosophy and the things about which I am most in earnest.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 801
  • The Beautiful exists just as little as the True. .In every case it is a question of the conditions of preservation of a certain type of man: thus the herd-man will experience the value feeling of the True in different things than will the Overman.^ Two different things wanteth the true man: danger and diversion.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Values did man only assign to things in order to maintain himself- he created only the significance of things, a human significance!
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 804
  • A declaration of war on the masses by Higher Men is needed! ... Everything that makes soft and effeminate, that serves the end of the People or the Feminine, works in favor of Universal Suffrage, i.e. the domination of the Inferior Men. But we should take reprisal and bring this whole affair to light and the bar of judgment.
    • Sec. .864
  • The rights a man arrogates to himself are related to the duties he imposes on himself, to the tasks to which he feels equal.^ He also entrusted me with the task of making his music known to his sister and his relations, a duty which I undertook very solemnly to fulfil.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    The great majority of men have no right to existence, but are a misfortune to higher men.
    • Sec. 872
  • The homogenizing of European man ... requires a justification: it lies in serving a higher sovereign species that stands upon the former which can raise itself to its task only by doing this. Not merely a Master Race whose sole task is to rule, but a Race with its own sphere of life, with an excess of strength ... strong enough to have no need of the tyranny of the virtue-imperative.
    • Sec. 898
  • There is only nobility of birth, only nobility of blood. When one speaks of "aristocrats of the spirit," reasons are usually not lacking for concealing something. As is well known, it is a favorite term among ambitious Jews. For spirit alone does not make noble. .Rather, there must be something to ennoble the spirit.^ Besides, there is this important point to remember: if a man wishes to understand his age and his contemporaries, he must be something of a colour student.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    What then is required? Blood.
    • Sec. .942
  • The possibility has been established for the production of...a Master Race, the future "masters of the earth"...made to endure for millennia — a higher kind of men who...employ democratic Europe as their most pliant and supple instrument for getting hold of the destinies of the earth.^ Higher than love to your neighbour is love to the furthest and future ones; higher still than love to men, is love to things and phantoms.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For a miserable foreign race of men, who will not even thank her—and not for me.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ On all sides the chasm has become too great, and I have to have recourse to every possible kind of chastening influence in order not to descend among the men of resentment myself.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Sec. 960

Disputed

.
  • Underneath the reality in which we live and have our being, another and altogether different reality lies concealed.^ Our lives, our work, and our enjoyment will then be for one another; possibly this is the only way in which we can work for the world as a whole.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • As quoted by Charles de Lint in The Little Country (1991), but no earlier sources yet found.
  • I am a pure-blooded Polish nobleman, without a single drop of bad blood, certainly not German blood.

Unsourced

.
  • Here the ways of men part: if you wish to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe; if you wish to be a devotee of truth, then inquire.^ I shall take care not to make this confession to anyone else, but once, I believe, you alone expressed the pleasure my style had given you.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For once again I believe in life, in men, in Paris, and even in myself; and very shortly I shall see you again.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I deeply sympathized with you when I heard the news, and, believe me, your wishes are mine.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • From a letter to his sister.
  • The future influences the present just as much as the past.
  • Every word is a prejudice.^ Much of the excellent past reaches my ears through your music and, as you perceive, some of the future as well.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But, my dear sister, just study "Dawn of Day" and "Joyful Wisdom" books whose contents and whose future are the richest on earth!
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To me these essays constitute a veritable treasure which every author of the past and future will have to envy me.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    (The Wanderer and his Shadow, sec. 55)
  • The greatest events are not our loudest hours, but rather our most quiet.
  • Ah, women. They make the highs higher and the lows more frequent. .(Beyond Good and Evil)
  • A woman may very well form a friendship with a man, but for this to endure, it must be assisted by a little physical antipathy.
  • At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid.^ I either remain dumb or intentionally only say as much as a polite man of the world is expected to say.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ During that time she told me a good deal about old days and recent ones as well; for instance, a lot about you, how Lizzie had grown so thin at Leipzig, and whether she drank cow's milk now, etc., etc.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Much intellect in a woman amounts to very little as far as I am concerned, for this so-called intellect, by which only the most superficial men are deceived, is nothing more than the most absurd pretentiousness.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .(Thus Spoke Zarathustra)
  • For out of fear and need each religion is born, creeping into existence on the byways of reason.
  • I cannot believe in a God who wants to be praised all the time.
  • In heaven all the interesting people are missing.^ And thus spake Zarathustra unto the people: .
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And all the people laughed at Zarathustra.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And Zarathustra spake thus unto the people: .
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • From the Nachlaß, KSA 13: 11[153]
    • Original context: Die Kirche hat deutsche Kaiser auf Grund ihrer Laster in Bann getan: als ob ein Mönch oder Priester über das mitreden dürfte, was ein Friedrich der Zweite von sich fordern darf. Ein Don Juan wird in die Hölle geschickt: das ist sehr naiv. .Hat man bemerkt, daß im Himmel alle interessanten Menschen fehlen?
    • Translated: The Church has excommunicated German emperors because of their vices: As if a monk or a priest had a say in what someone like Friedrich II [the Staufer, 1194-1250] may demand of himself.^ You can take my word for it, that for men like me, a marriage after the type of Goethe's would be the best of all—that is to say, a marriage with a good housekeeper!
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      A Don Juan is sent to hell: that is very naïve. .Is it noticed that in Heaven all the interesting people are missing?
  • After the old god has been assassinated, I am ready to rule the world.
  • Swallow your poison, for you need it badly.
  • Blessed are the forgetful, for they get the best of even their blunders.
  • What is bad?^ MY DEAR OLD FRIEND GERSDORFF: I have just heard of the terrible blow that has befallen you in the loss of your mother.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Do you need Web space for your genealogy ?

    ^ They call you heartless: but your heart is true, and I love the bashfulness of your goodwill.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spake Zarathustra, 1891 20 September 2009 14:31 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .But I have said this already: all that comes of weakness, of envy, of revenge.^ It is a funny thing that in spite of one's best intentions for the general weal one's own paltry personality with all its wretchedness and weakness comes and trips one up.
    • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    The anarchist and the Christian have the same origin.
  • We have art in order not to die of the truth.
  • Your pride can't hurt me — I have no beliefs!
  • No price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.
  • He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying.
  • People demand freedom only when they have no power.
  • He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.
  • Madness is rare in individuals, but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.
  • Many are stubborn in pursuit of the path they have chosen, few in pursuit of the goal.
  • The errors of great men are venerable because they are more fruitful than the truths of little men.
  • To predict the behavior of ordinary people in advance, you only have to assume that they will always try to escape a disagreeable situation with the smallest possible expenditure of intelligence.

Quotes about Nietzsche

  • The degree of introspection achieved by Nietzsche had never been achieved by anyone, nor is it ever likely to be achieved again.
    • Sigmund Freud, in remarks (28 October 1908), as reported in Freud, Adler, and Jung (1980) by Walter Arnold Kaufmann, p. .265
    • Variant: Freud several times said of Nietzsche that he had a more penetrating knowledge of himself than any other man who ever lived or was likely to live.^ But for you also, especially when I think of the sort of free spirit you have lighted upon!—a man who longs for nothing more than daily to be rid of some comforting belief, and who seeks and finds his happiness in this daily increase in the emancipation of his spirit.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Like the most modest of the visitors here, I live incognito ; in the visitors list I appear as "Schoolmaster Nietzsche."
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ So now I have said all I had to say on this matter, although I know perfectly well that it will not please you any more than it pleases me.
      • Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikisource 24 January 2010 14:014 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

      • As reported in Freud, Adler, and Jung (1980) by Walter Arnold Kaufmann, p. 266 (part of this statement has sometimes been taken as a direct quote of Freud, rather than a summation of what he said).

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Simple English

Friedrich Nietzsche
Full name Friedrich Nietzsche
Era 19th century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Weimar Classicism; precursor to Continental philosophy, existentialism, postmodernism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis
Main interests aesthetics, ethics, ontology, philosophy of history, psychology, value-theory
Notable ideas Apollonian and Dionysian, death of God, eternal recurrence, herd-instinct, master-slave morality, Übermensch, perspectivism, will to power, ressentiment

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (born October 15, 1844 - died August 25, 1900) was a German author and philosopher. He wrote several books that he hoped would change the world. Many people have found his books interesting and acknowledged them as great works of literature and philosophy.

Contents

Beliefs

Nietzsche wrote a lot about how people should live their lives. He attacked most of the moral ideas that were popular at the time because he did not believe that there are any real facts about what is right or wrong. He thought people should create their own facts about morality.

He also often attacked the morality of the Christian religion. He believed that the Christian idea that one should feel pity when one sees weakness was unhelpful. According to him, weak people rely on other people's love as a way of protecting themselves. Nietzsche believed that people should be stronger than that.

He thought that people should be very aware of their body and of the real world in which they actually live. He told his readers not to live in a daydream or make decisions based on unrealistic thoughts. He believed that ideas of heaven came from an inability to cope with life in the world.

Nietzsche considered the world to be one connected thing, including mankind and nature. He invented the idea of the "will to power". This idea is that everyone and everything is trying to overcome itself, or defeat or take control from itself. Therefore, if the world is just one thing, this is the force that makes the world.

Nietzsche thought that human beings would be successful at overcoming themselves, and he thought that when they did, they would be different and better. He named the person who would do this someday a "superman" (or Übermensch" in German). He thought that the supermen would be stronger than normal humans, and not restricted by other people's ideas of right and wrong.

Ideas

The Death of God

  • The Übermensch (Overman)
  • The Will to Power
  • Apollo & Dionysus
  • Master & Slave Morality
  • Amor Fati (Love of Fate)
  • Eternal Recurrence

Influence

Adolf Hitler, the German Chancellor and leader of the Nazis in World War II, read Nietzsche's work. Some people say that Hitler did not understand Nietzsche's ideas, but he used them to try to show that his actions were right.

Nietzsche wrote in a very fiery and exciting way. However, what he wrote later in his life became more and more odd. When he was forty years old, Nietzsche went insane. Supposedly, one day in the city of Turin, Italy, he saw a horse being whipped by its owner and ran to save it, hugging it around the throat. After this, Nietzsche never wrote again and could not look after himself. This illness may have been caused by the disease syphillis, or a brain tumour.

His writing and ideas are still popular and of interest to academics and intellectuals.

Weblinks

mrj:Ницше, Фридрих Вильгельм


rue:Фрідріх Ніцше


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 14, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Friedrich Nietzsche, which are similar to those in the above article.








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