Fuchsia (color): Wikis

  

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Fuchsia(#FF00FF)

Flower of Fuchsia plant.

Fuchsia is a pinkish-purple color named after the flower of the fuchsia plant. Fuchsia is used as an alias for electric magenta.

There is also a somewhat redder and slightly less saturated hue termed fashion fuchsia that is used in women's fashion (it is also called Hollywood cerise).

The first recorded use of fuchsia as a color name in English was in 1892. [1]

Contents

Web color

Fuchsia (web color)
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #FF00FF
sRGBB (r, g, b) (255, 0, 255)
HSV (h, s, v) (300°, 100%, 100[2]%)
Source HTML/CSS[3]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

This color gained currency in computer usage as an alias for #FF00FF, full magenta (often semi-erroneously called bright pink or vivid pink). Specifying fuchsia in Cascading Style Sheets will yield that color. It is part of the 16-color palette of most computer systems. It is also commonly used to indicate transparency.

Before 1958, the color magenta was called brilliant rose in Crayola crayons. (See the website "Lost Crayola Crayon Colors": [1]) After 1958, the name of the color was changed to Magenta, though the Crayola color magenta is not identical to the web color fuchsia--it is much closer to the color Rose.

There are a number of colors in the fuchsia/magenta range. Some of them are indicated below and color bands displaying the various shades of magenta for comparison are appended to the variations of magenta article.

In 1949, the color names of Crayola crayons were reformed and became more scientific, more of the names of the colors of the crayons being based on the names of colors in the original 1930 edition of the Dictionary of Color and the color names of the Munsell color system. Crayola crayons set up a color naming system similar to that used in the Munsell Color Wheel, except that violet instead of purple was used as the primary color on the color wheel between red and blue. The web color fuchsia is equivalent to the pure chroma on Munsell Color Wheel of the Munsell color system that is designated as "5RP" (reddish purple) i.e., a purple that is shaded toward red (the color we can achieve today with computers is a much more saturated pure color wheel chroma hue than the original color chip shown on the Munsell color wheel diagram in the Munsell color system article). In 1972, a new Crayola crayon color was introduced called hot magenta which is the closest equivalent to the web color fuchsia in Crayola crayons. (See List of Crayola crayon colors.)

The color shown in the color box above is the color called "Fuchsia" in A Dictionary of Color. That is why the name fuchsia was chosen as the equivalent to one of the three secondary additive primary colors, electric magenta, because A Dictionary of Color' was the primary reference on color names (besides the Munsell Book of Color) before the introduction of personal computers. The color shown above is somewhat brighter than most actual flowers of the fuchsia plant. The color shown as magenta in A Dictionary of Color is a somewhat different color than the color shown in that book as fuchsia--it is the original color magenta now called rich magenta or magenta (dye) (see the article on magenta for a color box displaying a sample of this original magenta).

Light fuchsia pink (pale magenta)

Light Fuchsia Pink
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #F984EF
RGBB (r, g, b) (249, 132, 229)
HSV (h, s, v) (300°, 27%, 94%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color light fuchsia pink.

This color is also called pale magenta.

Fuchsia pink (light magenta)

Fuchsia Pink
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #FF77FF
RGBB (r, g, b) (255, 119, 255)
HSV (h, s, v) (300°, 47%, 84%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color fuchsia pink.

This color is also called light magenta.

Fashion fuchsia (Hollywood cerise)

Fashion Fuchsia
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #F400A1
RGBB (r, g, b) (244, 0, 161)
HSV (h, s, v) (320°, 100%, 96%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

In women's fashion industry circles, the color displayed at right, fashion fuchsia is known as a popular color for clothing, shoes, and accessories, where it is a slightly less saturated hue of pink than Shocking pink.

In the 1950s, a popular brand of colored pencils, Venus Paradise, had a colored pencil called Hollywood cerise which was this color. (See Hollywood cerise.) Before being renamed "Hollywood cerise" in the 1940s, the color had before that, since 1922, been known simply as Hollywood. [4]

Royal fuchsia

Royal Fuchsia
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #CA2C92
RGBB (r, g, b) (202, 44, 146)
HSV (h, s, v) (290°, 67%, 44%)
Source Internet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color royal fuchsia.

The source of this color is the following color chart: [2] (See color sample of Royal Fuchsia)

Deep fuchsia

Deep Fuchsia
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #C154C1
RGBB (r, g, b) (193, 84, 193)
HSV (h, s, v) (300°, 67%, 72%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color deep fuchsia. Parts of some fuchsia flowers are colored this deeper color of fuchsia.

This color has equal proportions of red and blue like the web color fuchsia, but has some green also and therefore is a deeper (darker) color. This is the color that is labeled fuchsia in the List of Crayola crayon colors.

Fandango

Fandango
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #B53389
RGBB (r, g, b) (181, 51, 137)
HSV (h, s, v) (320°, 72%, 71[5]%)
Source Maerz and Paul
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color fandango.

The first recorded use of fandango as a color name in English was in 1925. [6]

Antique fuchsia

Antique Fuchsia
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #915C83
RGBB (r, g, b) (145, 92, 131)
HSV (h, s, v) (316°, 37%, 57[7]%)
Source Plochere
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color antique fuchsia.

The first recorded use of antique fuchsia as a color name in English was in 1928. [8]

The source of this color is the Plochere Color System, a color system formulated in 1948 that is widely used by interior designers. [9]



Fuchsia in human culture

Lexicography
  • In gay slang, a beautiful, attractive woman is known as a fuchsia queen.[10]
Sexuality

See also

References

  1. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill--Page 195; Color Sample of Fuchsia Page 123 Plate 50 Color Sample I 12
  2. ^ web.forrett.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #FF00FF (Fuchsia) :
  3. ^ W3C TR CSS3 Color Module, HTML4 color keywords
  4. ^ Maerz and Paul, A Dictionary of Color New York:1930--McGraw-Hill See Hollywood in Index, Page 196 and Color Sample of Hollywood, Page 33, Plate 5, Color Sample K5
  5. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #B53389 (Fandango):
  6. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill--Page 195; Color Sample of Fandango Page 127 Plate 52 Color Sample L 10
  7. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #915C83 (Antique Fuchsia):
  8. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill--Page 189; Color Sample of Antique Fuchsia Page 109 Plate 43 Color Sample K7
  9. ^ Plochere Color System:
  10. ^ Rodgers, Bruce Gay Talk: The Queen's Vernacular – A Dictionary of Gay Slang New York:1972Paragon Books, G.P. Putnam's Sons Page 87 – Fuchsia queen
  11. ^ Martine, Lord. (2001-11-16.) "A friendly pocket in the Castro." San Francisco Chronicle, via sfgate.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-24.







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