Fukushima Prefecture: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fukushima Prefecture
Japanese: 福島県
Fukushima-ken
Map of Japan with Fukushima highlighted
Capital Fukushima (city)
Region Tōhoku
Island Honshū
Governor Yūhei Sato
Area (rank) 13,782.54 km² (3rd)
 - % water 0.9%
Population  (January 1, 2003)
 - Population 2,119,218 (17th)
 - Density 154 /km²
Districts 13
Municipalities 61
ISO 3166-2 JP-07
Website www.pref.fukushima.jp/
index_e.html
Prefectural Symbols
 - Flower Nemotoshakunage (Rhododendron brachycarpum)
 - Tree Japanese zelkova (Zelkova serrata)
 - Bird Narcissus Flycatcher (Ficedula narcissina)
 - Fish {{{Fish}}}
Symbol of Fukushima Prefecture
Symbol of Fukushima Prefecture
Template ■ Discussion ■ WikiProject Japan
Map of Fukushima Prefecture.

Fukushima Prefecture (福島県 Fukushima-ken ?) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Tōhoku region on the island of Honshū. The capital is the city of Fukushima.

Contents

History

In the 4th century, Fukushima was incorporated into the Yamato Province, Japan's first unified nation.

The Shirakawa Barrier and the Nakoso Barrier were built around the 5th century to protect 'civilized Japan' from the 'barbarians' to the north. Fukushima became a Province of Mutsu after the Taika Reforms were established in 646.[1]

The province of Fukushima was conquered by Prince Subaru in 1293. This region of Japan is also known as Michinoku and Ōshū.

The Fukushima Incident took place in the prefecture after Mishima Michitsune was appointed governor in 1882.

Geography

Fukushima is the southernmost prefecture of Tōhoku region, and the closest to Tokyo. It is divided by mountain ranges into three regions called (from west to east) Aizu, Nakadōri, and Hamadōri.

The coastal Hamadōri region lies on the Pacific Ocean and is the flattest and most temperate region, while the Nakadōri region is the agricultural heart of the prefecture and contains the capital, Fukushima City. The mountainous Aizu region has scenic lakes, lush forests, and snowy winters.

Advertisements

Cities

Thirteen cities are located in Fukushima Prefecture:

Towns and villages

Towns and villages in each district:

Ōtama
Kawamata
Kōri
Kunimi
Futaba
Hirono
Katsurao
Kawauchi
Namie
Naraha
Ōkuma
Tomioka
Hanawa
Samegawa
Tanagura
Yamatsuri
Asakawa
Furudono
Hirata
Ishikawa
Tamakawa
Kagamiishi
Tenei
Aizubange
Yanaizu
Yugawa
Hinoemata
Minamiaizu
Shimogō
Tadami
Izumizaki
Nakajima
Nishigō
Yabuki
Aizumisato
Kaneyama
Mishima
Shōwa
Iitate
Shinchi
Miharu
Ono
Bandai
Inawashiro
Kitashiobara
Nishiaizu

Mergers

Future mergers

  • The towns of Kawamata and Iino from the Date District are scheduled to be annexed by the city of Fukushima on July 1, 2008. However, the assembly of Kawamata voted to object to the merger on September 15, 2006, which may lead to the cancellation of this merger.

Economy

The coastal region traditionally specializes in fishing and seafood industries, and is notable for its electric and particularly nuclear power-generating industry, while the upland regions are more focused on agriculture.

The capital region has a strong industry in software and electronics.

Demographics

Culture

Legend has it that an ogress, Adachigahara, once roamed the plain after whom it was named. The Adachigahara plain lies close to the city of Fukushima.

Tourism

Aizuwakamatsu was the site of an important battle in the Boshin war, during which 19 teenage members of the Byakkotai committed ritual seppuku suicide. Their graves on Mt. Iimori are a popular tourist attraction.

Mount Bandai, in the Bandai-Asahi National Park, erupted in 1888, creating a large crater and numerous lakes, including the picturesque 'Five Coloured Lakes' (Goshiki-numa). The area is popular with hikers and skiers.

Famous people

Kitakata is well known for its distinctive Kitakata ramen (Chinese noodles) and well-preserved traditional storehouse buildings, while Ouchijuku in the town of Shimogo retains numerous thatched buildings from the Edo Period.

References

  • Takeda, Toru; Hishinuma, Tomio; Oguma; Takiguchi, R. (July 7, 2001), Fukushima - Today & Tomorrow, Aizu-Wakamatsu City: Rekishi Shunju Publishing Co., ISBN 4-89757-432-3  
  1. ^ Takeda T., page 10.
  2. ^ Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize

External links

Coordinates: 37°24′N 140°28′E / 37.4°N 140.467°E / 37.4; 140.467


Simple English

Fukushima Prefecture (福島県, Fukushima-ken?) is located in the Tōhoku region on the island of Honshū, Japan, approximately 300 km north of Tokyo. The capital is the city of Fukushima.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message