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In this Japanese name, the family name is Demura.
Fumio Demura

F. Demura, November 2006
Born September 15, 1938 (1938-09-15) (age 71)
Yokohama, Japan
Residence United States Santa Ana, California, United States of America
Nationality Japanese
Style Shitō-ryū Karate
Teacher(s) Ryusho Sakagami, Taira Shinken
Rank 9th dan karate
Official website
This article contains Japanese text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of kanji and kana.

Fumio Demura (出村 文男 Demura Fumio?, September 15, 1938–) is a Japanese master of karate.[1] He is a well known master of karate and kobudo (weaponry),[2] and his martial arts skills featured in the Karate Kid series of films.[3] Demura holds the rank of 9th dan in Shitō-ryū karate.[1]

Early life

Demura was born on September 15, 1938, in Yokohama, Japan.[1] At the age of 9, he began training in karate and kendo under an instructor named Asano.[1] At the age of 12 started training under Ryusho Sakagami in Itosu-kai karate.[1] Demura received his 1st dan black belt in 1956,[1] and won the East Japan Championships in 1957.[1] In 1959, he began training in kobudo, a style of Okinawan weapons training, under the direction of Taira Shinken.[1][2] In 1963, Demura met martial arts scholar Donn Draeger, who introduced him to Dan Ivan, who would eventually bring him to the United States of America as a karate instructor.[3]

United States of America

In 1965, Demura came to the United States, representing the Japan Karate-do Itosu-kai.[1] From his base in southern California, he became well known for his karate and kobudo skills.[3] In 1971, he was ranked 5th dan,[4] and he remained at that rank until at least 1982.[5] Through the 1970s and 1980s, Demura wrote several martial arts books, including: Shito-Ryu Karate (1971),[6] Advanced nunchaku (1976, co-authored),[7] Tonfa: Karate weapon of self-defense (1982),[8] Nunchaku: Karate weapon of self-defense (1986),[9] Bo: Karate weapon of self-defense (1987),[10] and Sai: Karate weapon of self-defense (1987).[11]

In the 1980s, Demura became involved in the Karate Kid series of films.[3] He was the stunt double for Pat Morita, who played Mr. Miyagi.[3] Demura has appeared in several films and documentaries, including: The Warrior within (1976),[12] The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977), The Karate Kid (1984), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989),[13] Shootfighter: Fight to the death (1992),[14] Rising Sun (1993),[15] The next Karate Kid (1994),[16] Masters of the martial arts (1998, presented by Wesley Snipes),[17] Mystic origins of the martial arts (1998),[18] Modern warriors (2002),[19] XMA: Xtreme Martial Arts (2003),[20] and Ninja (2009).[21]

In 1986, Demura was promoted to 7th dan in Shito-ryū karate.[1] In 2001, he was expelled from the Itosu-kai,[22] and became the Director of Shito-ryū Karate-do Genbu-kai.[1] In 2005, he was promoted to 9th dan.[1] He currently resides in Santa Ana, California.[23]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Japan Karate-Do Genbu-Kai International: Sensei Demura at a glance ... (c. 2007). Retrieved on March 3, 2010.
  2. ^ a b Clayton, B. D., Horowitz, R., & Pollard, E. (2004): Shotokan's secret: The hidden truth behind Karate's fighting origins (p. 108). Black Belt Books. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0144-6)
  3. ^ a b c d e USA Dojo: Shihan Fumio Demura (c. 2009). Retrieved on March 3, 2010.
  4. ^ Demura, F. (1971): Shito-Ryu Karate (p. 4). Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0005-0)
  5. ^ Demura, F. (1982): Tonfa: Karate weapon of self-defense (p. 5). Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0080-7)
  6. ^ Demura, F. (1971): Shito-Ryu Karate. Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0005-0)
  7. ^ Demura, F., & Ivan, D. (1976): Advanced nunchaku. Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0021-0)
  8. ^ Demura, F. (1982): Tonfa: Karate weapon of self-defense. Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0080-7)
  9. ^ Demura, F. (1986): Nunchaku: Karate weapon of self-defense. Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0006-7)
  10. ^ Demura, F. (1987): Bo: Karate weapon of self-defense. Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0019-7)
  11. ^ Demura, F. (1987): Sai: Karate weapon of self-defense. Burbank, CA: Ohara. (ISBN 978-0-8975-0010-4)
  12. ^ IMDb: The Warrior within (1976) – Full cast and crew Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  13. ^ IMDb: The Karate Kid, Part III (1989) – Full cast and crew Retrieved on March 3, 2010.
  14. ^ IMDb: Shootfighter – Fight to the death (1992) – Full cast and crew Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  15. ^ IMDb: Rising Sun (1993) – Full cast and crew Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  16. ^ IMDb: The next Karate Kid (1994) – Full cast and crew Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  17. ^ IMDb: Masters of the martial arts (1998) Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  18. ^ IMDb: Mystic origins of the martial arts (1998) Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  19. ^ IMDb: Modern warriors (2002) Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  20. ^ IMDb: XMA – Xtreme Martial Arts (2003) Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  21. ^ IMDb: Ninja (2009) – Full cast and crew Retrieved on March 4, 2010.
  22. ^ Karate World: Fumio Demura expelled from Itosu-kai (November 1, 2001). Retrieved on March 3, 2010.
  23. ^ Demura, F. (2006): Fumio Demura resume (June 6, 2006). Retrieved on March 3, 2010.

External links

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Template:Infobox Martial artist biography

Fumio Demura (born in Yokohama, Japan in 1938) is a Japanese martial artist and martial arts teacher[1], 9th dan in Shitō-ryū, holding the title of shihan.

Contents

Background

At the age of 8 he began training in the martial arts under Asano Sensei, and started training under Ryusho Sakagami in Shito-ryū Itosu Kai karate when he was 12. Demura received his 1st Degree black belt in 1956 and won the East Japan Karate Championship in 1957. In early 1958 Demura began training in kobudō, a style of Okinawan weapons training, under the direction of Sensei Shinken Taira. Demura is renowned for his abilities as a weapons instructor and taught famous martial arts movie performers such as Bruce Lee. In 1961 he won the All-Japan Karate Championships. Four years later, in partnership with Dan Ivan, Demura came to the United States to teach and promote Shito-ryū Karate.

In the following years Demura gained international renown with his innovative martial arts demonstrations in southern California and Las Vegas. He also became the Chief Instructor of Shito-ryū Itosu Kai USA. During his time in Las Vegas he trained Steven Seagal.

Demura has received numerous awards and recognitions from the American and International martial arts communities. In 2005 he celebrated his 40th year in the United States as a martial artist and teacher. Genbu Kai International split off from Itosu Kai International in 2003 after the 2001 political dispute in which he was expelled from Shito-ryū Itosu Kai. He is currently the President and Chief Instructor of Shito-ryū Genbu Kai International.

Demura lives in Southern California, but spends much of his time touring (in the USA and abroad) as a teacher and guest official. He teaches Karate to different students in many U.S. states and in more than 24 countries. Despite having lived in the United States for over 40 years, Demura remains a Japanese citizen but can speak english very well. After recovering from minor heart problems he has been traveling around the globe much of the time, visiting Genbu-Kai dojos, conducting Karate and Kobudō seminars and making movies.

Film Appearances

Bibliography

  • Advanced Nunchaku (2004)[2]
  • Tonfa, Karate Weapon of Self-defense: Karate Weapon of Self-Defense (1982) [3]
  • Shitō-ryū Karate (1971) [4]
  • Bo Karate: Karate Weapon of Self-Defense (1976) [5]
  • Nunchaku, Karate Weapon of Self-defense: Karate Weapon of Self-Defense (1971) [6]
  • Sai: Karate Weapon of Self-Defense: Karate Weapon of Self-Defense (1974) [7]

References


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