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Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Born 11 November 1821(1821-11-11)
Moscow, Russian Empire
Died 9 February 1881 (aged 59)
Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
Occupation Novelist
Genres suspense, literary fiction
Notable work(s) Crime and Punishment
The Idiot
The Brothers Karamazov
The Possessed
Signature
.Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, Fёdor Mihajlovič Dostoevskij, pronounced [ˈfʲodər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ dəstɐˈjɛfskʲɪj]  ( listen)),[4] sometimes transliterated Dostoevsky, Dostoievsky, Dostojevskij, Dostoevski, Dostojevski or Dostoevskij (11 November [O.S. 30 October] 1821 – 9 February [O.S. 29 January] 1881) was a Russian writer and essayist, known for his novels Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.^ Portrait by Vasily Perov, 1872 Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky listen ) (born November 11 , (October 30, Old Style ), 1821 , Moscow ; died February 9 , (January 28, O.S. ), 1881 , St. Petersburg , Russia ), Russian writer , one of the major figures in Russian literature .
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^ (Quote from wikipedia.org) About the Author "Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, Dostoievsky, Dostojevskij or Dostoevski listen (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821 - February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) was a Russian novelist and writer of fiction whose works, including Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, have had a profound and lasting effect on intellectual thought and world literature.
  • The Idiot (Forgotten Books): Amazon.co.uk: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.co.uk [Source type: General]

^ Fyodor Dostoevsky Forum - Index Fyodor Dostoevsky headquarters - all about the great Russian author of Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.

.Dostoyevsky's literary output explores human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society.^ His work explores political and social 19th century Russia.
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^ Dostoevsky's literary output explores human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society.
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  • The Idiot (Forgotten Books): Amazon.co.uk: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.co.uk [Source type: General]
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^ Dostoevsky's literary output explores human psychology in the troubled political, social and spirituality context of 19th-century Russian society.
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Considered by many as a founder or precursor of 20th-century existentialism, his Notes from Underground (1864), written in the embittered voice of the anonymous "underground man", was called by Walter Kaufmann the "best overture for existentialism ever written."[5] A prominent figure in world literature, Dostoyevsky is often acknowledged by critics as one of the greatest psychologists in world literature.[6]

Contents

Biography

Family origins

Mariinsky Hospital in Moscow, Dostoyevsky's birthplace.
Dostoyevsky's mother was Russian. .His paternal ancestors were from a village called Dostoyev in Belarus, in the guberniya (province) of Minsk, not far from Pinsk; the stress on the family name was originally on the second syllable, matching that of the town (Dostóev), but in the nineteenth century was shifted to the third syllable.^ His paternal ancestors were Lithuanian, from a place called Dostoyeve, natives of the government of Minsk, not far from Pinsk.
  • Great Russian Gifts and Nesting Dolls, RussianWriters6 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.greatrussiangifts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His novels are peopled by characters who dramatize the fierce debates that preoccupied the Russian intelligentsia during the second half of the nineteenth century.

^ What is clear is that Dostoevsky's portrait of Isay Fomitch echoes the bigotry-ridden atmosphere of Russia at the end of the second half of the nineteenth century.

[7] .According to one account, Dostoyevsky's paternal ancestors were Polonized nobles (szlachta) of Ruthenian origin and went to war bearing Polish Radwan Coat of Arms.^ Dostoevsky's paternal ancestors were Polonized nobles (szlachta) and went to war bearing Polish Radwan Coat of Arms.
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^ According to one theory, Dostoevsky's paternal ancestors were Polonized nobles ( szlachta ) and went to war bearing Polish Radwan Coat of Arms .
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^ The family originated from the Polish Szlachta family Dostojewski Radwan Coat of Arms.

.Dostoyevsky (Polish "Dostojewski") Radwan armorial bearings were drawn for the Dostoyevsky Museum in Moscow.^ Dostoevsky (Polish "Dostojewski") Radwan armorial bearings were drawn for the Dostoevsky Museum in Moscow .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky (Polish "Dostojewski") Radwan armorial bearings were drawn for the Dostoevsky Museum in Moscow.
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^ Dostoevsky's paternal ancestors were Polonized nobles (szlachta) and went to war bearing Polish Radwan Coat of Arms.
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[8]

Early life

.Dostoyevsky was the second of six children born to Mikhail and Maria Dostoyevsky.^ Born to parents Mikhail and Maria, Fyodor was the second of seven children.
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^ Fyodor was the second of seven children born to Mikhail and Maria Dostoevsky.
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^ Early life Dostoevsky was the second of seven children born to Mikhail and Maria Dostoevsky.
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[9] .Dostoyevsky's father Mikhail was a retired military surgeon and a violent alcoholic, who had practiced at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor in Moscow.^ It was not long before his father, a retired military surgeon who served as a doctor at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor in Moscow , also died in 1839 .
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^ In 1839 they lost their father, a retired military surgeon and a violent alcoholic, who served as a doctor at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor in Moscow.
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^ Dostoevsky's father was a retired military surgeon and a violent alcoholic, who served as a doctor at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor in Moscow.
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.The hospital was located in one of the city's worst areas; local landmarks included a cemetery for criminals, a lunatic asylum, and an orphanage for abandoned infants.^ The hospital sat in a neighborhood of squalor, one of the worst areas in Moscow.
  • Biography of Dostoevsky - Early Years 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The hospital was situated in one of the worst areas in Moscow.
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^ The landmarks included a cemetery for criminals, a lunatic asylum, and an orphanage for abandoned infants.
  • Biography of Dostoevsky - Early Years 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

.This urban landscape made a lasting impression on the young Dostoyevsky, whose interest in and compassion for the poor, oppressed and tormented was apparent.^ This urban landscape made a lasting impression on the young Dostoevsky, whose interest in and compassion for the poor, oppressed, and tormented was apparent.
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^ This urban landscape made a lasting impression on the young Dostoevsky, whose interests in and compassion for the poor and oppressed tormented him.

^ This urban landscape made a lasting impression on the young Dostoevsky, whose interests in and compassion for the poor, oppressed, and tormented was apparent.
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.Though his parents forbade it, Dostoyevsky liked to wander out to the hospital garden, where the suffering patients sat to catch a glimpse of sun.^ Though his parents forbade it, Dostoevsky liked to wander out to the hospital garden, where the suffering patients sat to catch a glimpse of sun.
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^ Though his parents forbade it, Dostoevsky liked to wander out to the hospital garden, where the suffering patients sat, devouring any small bit of sun.
  • Biography of Dostoevsky - Early Years 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ They were so crumpled and so short that he looked as though he had grown out of them like a boy.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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.The young Dostoyevsky loved to spend time with these patients and hear their stories.^ The young Dostoevsky loved to spend time with these patients.
  • Biography of Dostoevsky - Early Years 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The young Dostoevsky loved to spend time with these patients and hear their stories.
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^ I agree on the whole abandoning of books; I love reading, and am always looking for new books to read, but I do find that I spend far too much time reading books that I just don't connect with.

.There are many stories of Dostoyevsky's father's despotic treatment of his children.^ There are many stories of Dostoevsky's father's despotic treatment of his children.
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^ He was also an alcoholic who was prone to violence, and, although there are numerous accounts of the cruelty with which he treated his children, Dostoevsky’s personal correspondences suggests that he and his father had a loving relationship.
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^ The Double by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Most significant of the Russian novelist's early stories (1846) offers straight-faced treatment of hallucinatory theme.

.After returning home from work, he would take a nap while his children, ordered to keep absolutely silent, stood by their slumbering father in shifts and swatted at any flies that came near his head.^ For example, every afternoon the doctor would return home for a nap.
  • Biography of Dostoevsky - Early Years 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ After returning home from work, he would take a nap and his children, ordered to keep absolutely silent, stood silently by their slumbering father in shifts and swatted flies around his head.

^ Take it home and keep it for yourself.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.However, it is the opinion of Joseph Frank, a biographer of Dostoyevsky, that the father figure in The Brothers Karamazov is not based on Dostoyevsky's own father.^ Here are Dostoyevsky’s own words concerning the writing of The Brothers Karamazov : .
  • Touchstone Archives: Selected Letters of Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.touchstonemag.com [Source type: Original source]

^ However, it is the opinion of Joseph Frank, a biographer of Dostoevsky, that the father figure in The Brothers Karamazov is not based on Dostoevsky's own father.
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^ Based on Dostoyevsky's own experience of financial desperation and the compulsive desire to win money, it focuses on the ...
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.Letters and personal accounts demonstrate that they had a fairly loving relationship.^ Letters and personal accounts demonstrate that they had a fairly loving relationship.
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^ He was also an alcoholic who was prone to violence, and, although there are numerous accounts of the cruelty with which he treated his children, Dostoevsky’s personal correspondences suggests that he and his father had a loving relationship.
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The young Dostoyevsky, in a portrait by Trutovsky, 1847
.Shortly after his mother died of tuberculosis in 1837, Dostoyevsky and his brother were sent to the Military Engineering Academy at Saint Petersburg.^ Fyodor's mother died of an illness in 1837 .
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Biography, Works, and Message Board 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.knowledgerush.com [Source type: General]

^ Shortly after her death in 1837, he was sent to St. Petersburg, where he entered the Academy for Military Engineers.
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^ At the age of 17 he was sent to the military academy in Saint Petersburg.
  • DOSTOYEVSKY, Fyodor Mikhaylovich 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.history.com [Source type: General]

.Fyodor's father died in 1839. Though it has never been proven, it is believed by some that he was murdered by his own serfs.^ Shortly after, the father was murdered by his own serfs.
  • Researching the Brothers Karamazov - Introductions: Anne Fremantle 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Though it has never been proven, it is widely believed that he was murdered by his own serfs.

^ In 1839 Dostoevsky's father died, probably of apoplexy but there were rumors that he was murdered by his own serfs.
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[10] .According to one account, they became enraged during one of his drunken fits of violence, restrained him, and poured vodka into his mouth until he drowned.^ According to one account, they became enraged during one of his drunken fits of violence, restrained him, and poured vodka into his mouth until he drowned.
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^ While not known for certain, it is believed that Mikhail Dostoevsky was murdered by his own serfs, who reportedly became enraged during one of Mikhail's drunken fits of violence, restrained him, and poured vodka into his mouth until he drowned.
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^ According to one account, he was murdered by his own serfs, who restrained him during one of his drunken rages and poured vodka down his throat until he drowned.
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.A similar account appears in Notes from Underground.^ The "speech" of the Underground Man is enclosed in the context of a fictional work, bounded by an introductory and an end note by the author (who in the end note does appear to have some characteristics of a fictional editor).
  • Dostoevsky Studies :: Bakhtin, Dostoevsky, and the Status of the "I" 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.utoronto.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ Number of similar titles: 22 Similar Title: Notes from underground Copyright Claimant: Evelyn Rudie Bernauer Notes: A musical play.
  • Notes from underground. Poor people. The Friend of the family. By Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky), compilation & cover art: Dell Publishing Company & Western Printing and Lithographing Company, as employer in a work made for hire - song, music - Copyright Info 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faqs.org [Source type: Reference]

.Another story holds that Mikhail died of natural causes, and a neighboring landowner invented the story of his murder so that he might buy the estate inexpensively.^ Another account holds that he died of natural causes, and that a neighbour invented the story of his murder so that he might buy the Dostoyevsky estate at a low price.
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^ Another story holds that Mikhail died of natural causes, and a neighboring landowner invented the story of his murder so that he might buy the estate inexpensively.
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^ Another story was that Mikhail died of natural causes, and a neighboring landowner cooked up this story of a peasant rebellion so he could buy the estate cheaply.
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.Some have argued that his father's personality had influenced the character of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, the "wicked and sentimental buffoon", father of the main characters in his 1880 novel The Brothers Karamazov, but such claims fail to withstand the scrutiny of many critics.^ The following is brief summary for the characters in Fyodor Dostoevksy's "The Brothers Karamazov."
  • mccannta: Brothers Karamazov - Character Summary 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC blog.mccannta.com [Source type: General]

^ Some have argued that his father's personality had influenced the character of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, the "wicked and sentimental buffoon", father of the main characters in his 1880 novel The Brothers Karamazov, but such claims fail to withstand the scrutiny of many critics.
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^ For the fifth chapter of novel The Brothers Karamazov .
  • Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC it.stlawu.edu [Source type: Academic]

.Dostoyevsky had epilepsy and his first seizure occurred when he was nine years old.^ Dostoevsky was an epileptic and his first seizure occurred when he was 9 years old.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ Dostoevsky had epilepsy and his first seizure occurred when he was 9 years old.
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^ The story of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, a 24-year-old who shook the Russian Literary World in 1845 with his novel Poor Folk is more illustrative here.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | ajc.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC projects.ajc.com [Source type: General]

[11] .Epileptic seizures recurred sporadically throughout his life, and Dostoyevsky's experiences are thought to have formed the basis for his description of Prince Myshkin's epilepsy in his novel The Idiot and that of Smerdyakov in The Brothers Karamazov, among others.^ Epileptic seizures recurred sporadically throughout his life, and Dostoevsky's experiences are thought to have formed the basis for his description of Prince Myshkin's epilepsy in his novel The Idiot, among others.
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^ The most notable epileptic characters in Dostoyevsky’s novels are Prince Myshkin in The Idiot and Smerdyakov in The Brothers Karamazov .
  • Diagnosing Dostoyevsky’s epilepsy « Neurophilosophy 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC neurophilosophy.wordpress.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Epileptic seizures recurred sporadically throughout his life, and Dostoevsky's experiences are thought to have formed the basis for his description of Prince Myshkin's epilepsy in his novel The Idiot , among others.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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.At the Saint Petersburg Academy of Military Engineering, Dostoyevsky was taught mathematics, a subject he despised.^ At the St Petersburg Academy of Military Engineering, Dostoevsky was taught mathematics , a subject he despised.
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^ Dostoevsky was sent to the St. Petersburg Academy of Military Engineering and since he was not very good at mathematics, a subject he despised, he did not do very well.
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^ He graduated from the St. Petersburg Military Engineering Academy at the age of 22.
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.However, he also studied literature by Shakespeare, Pascal, Victor Hugo and E.T.A. Hoffmann.^ However, he also studied literature by Shakespeare, Pascal, Victor Hugo and E.T.A. Hoffmann.
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^ For general critical consent, among the bundle of universal world authors, next to Dante, Shakespeare, Miguel of Cervantes, Victor Hugo and other, Dostoevsky has influenced decisively in the literature of the century 20, particularly in the existentialism and the expressionism.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ However, he also studied literature by Shakespeare , Pascal , Victor Hugo and E.T.A. Hoffmann .
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.Though he focused on areas different from mathematics, he did well on the exams and received a commission in 1841. That year, he wrote two romantic plays, influenced by the German poet/playwright Friedrich Schiller: Mary Stuart and Boris Godunov.^ That year, he is known to have written two romantic plays, influenced by the German Romantic poet/playwright Friedrich Schiller: Mary Stuart and Boris Godunov .
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ That year, he is known to have written two romantic plays, influenced by the German Romantic poet/playwright Friedrich Schiller: Mary Stuart and Boris Godunov.
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^ That year, he is known to have written two romantic plays, influenced by the German Romantic poet/playwright Friedrich Schiller : Mary Stuart and Boris Godunov .
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The plays have not been preserved. .Dostoyevsky described himself as a "dreamer" when he was a young man, and at that time revered Schiller.^ Dostoevsky described himself as a "dreamer" when he was a young man, and at that time revered Schiller .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky described himself as a "dreamer" when he was a young man, and at that time revered Schiller.
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^ He showed homosexual tendencies as a young man, writing two plays that have fortunately been lost to time.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.However, in the years during which he yielded his great masterpieces, his opinions changed and he sometimes poked fun at Schiller.^ However, in the years during which he yielded his great masterpieces, his opinions changed and he sometimes poked fun at Schiller.
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^ Though Dostoevsky, a self-described "dreamer" as a young man, at the time revered Schiller, in the years which yielded his great masterpieces he usually poked fun at him.
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Beginnings of a literary career

.Dostoyevsky was made a lieutenant in 1842, and left the Engineering Academy the following year.^ BEGINNINGS OF A LITERARY CAREER Dostoevsky was made a lieutenant in 1842, and left the Engineering Academy the following year.
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^ Dostoevsky was made a lieutenant in 1842, and left the Engineering Academy the following year.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ Beginnings of a literary career Dostoevsky was made a lieutenant in 1842, and left the Engineering Academy the following year.
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He completed a translation into Russian of Balzac's novel Eugénie Grandet in 1843, but it brought him little or no attention.^ He completed a translation into Russian of Balzac's novel Eugénie Grandet in 1843, but it brought him little or no attention.
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^ He completed a translation into Russian of Balzac's novel Eugenie Grandet in 1843, but it brought him little or no attention.
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^ He completed a translation into Russian of Balzac 's novel Eugénie Grandet in 1843, but it brought him little or no attention.
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.Dostoyevsky started to write his own fiction in late 1844 after leaving the army.^ Dostoevsky started to write his own fiction in late 1844 after leaving the army.
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^ In what could be an allusion to Dostoyevsky’s own circumstances, we learn that Smerdyakov’s seizures apparently started one week after he is slapped about the face by Grygory, one of the familie’s servants.
  • Diagnosing Dostoyevsky’s epilepsy « Neurophilosophy 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC neurophilosophy.wordpress.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Here are Dostoyevsky’s own words concerning the writing of The Brothers Karamazov : .
  • Touchstone Archives: Selected Letters of Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.touchstonemag.com [Source type: Original source]

.In 1846, his first work, the epistolary short novel, Poor Folk, printed in the almanach A Petersburg Collection (published by N. Nekrasov), was met with great acclaim.^ In winter he conceived the novel Poor Folk .
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^ Nekrasov and Belinsky delighted with the Poor Folk .
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^ His first novel Poor Folk appeared in 1846.
  • Famous Russian People. Russian celebrities. Russian poets, Russian painters, Russian artists 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC stpetersburg-guide.com [Source type: Original source]

As legend has it, the editor of the magazine, poet Nikolai Nekrasov, walked into the office of liberal critic Vissarion Belinsky and announced, "A new Gogol has arisen!" Belinsky, his followers, and many others agreed. After the novel was fully published in book form at the beginning of the next year, Dostoyevsky became a literary celebrity at the age of 24.
.In 1846, Belinsky and many others reacted negatively to his novella, The Double, a psychological study of a bureaucrat whose alter ego overtakes his life.^ In 1846, Belinsky and many others reacted negatively to his novella, The Double, a psychological study of a bureaucrat whose alter ego overtakes his life.
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^ In 1846, Belinsky and many others reacted negatively to his novella, The Double , a psychological study of a bureaucrat whose alter ego overtakes his life.
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^ Belinsky judged the novel Dvoynik (1846; The Double) and the short stories Gospodin Prokharchin (1846; Mr. Prokharchin) and Khozyayka (1847; The Landlady) as devoid of a social message.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

Dostoyevsky's fame began to fade. .Much of his work after Poor Folk received ambivalent reviews and it seemed that Belinsky's prediction that Dostoyevsky would be one of the greatest writers of Russia was mistaken.^ Much of his work after Poor Folk was met with mixed reviews and it seemed that Belinsky's prediction that Dostoevsky would be one of the greatest writers of Russia was mistaken.

^ DOSTOYEVSKY's last work and greatest novel.
  • Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky - My Favorite Author 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC ezinearticles.com [Source type: General]

^ Much of his work after Poor Folk met with mixed reviews and it seemed that Belinsky's prediction that Dostoevsky would be one of the greatest writers of Russia was mistaken.
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Statue of Dostoyevsky in Omsk

Exile in Siberia

.Dostoyevsky was incarcerated on 23 April 1849, for being part of the liberal intellectual group, the Petrashevsky Circle.^ Exile in Siberia Dostoevsky was arrested and imprisoned on April 23, 1849 for being a part of the liberal, intellectual group, the Petrashevsky Circle.
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky was arrested and imprisoned on April 23, 1849 for being a part of the liberal, intellectual group, the Petrashevsky Circle.
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^ Dostoevsky was arrested and imprisoned on April 23 1849 for being a part of the liberal intellectual group, the Petrashevsky Circle .
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.Tsar Nicholas I after seeing the Revolutions of 1848 in Europe was harsh on any sort of underground organization which he felt could put autocracy into jeopardy.^ Tsar Nicholas I after seeing the Revolutions of 1848 in Europe was harsh on any sort of underground organization which he felt could put autocracy into jeopardy.
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^ Czar Nicholas I after seeing the Revolutions of 1848 in Europe was harsh on any sort of underground organization which he felt could put autocracy into jeopardy.
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  • CELLTEXTS | Fyodor M. Dostoevsky: Letters and Reminiscences 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC celltexts.org [Source type: General]

^ Gestalt—Ivan was raised in Orthodox Christian Russia during the time of the tsars and the Age of Enlightenment, just before the revolution that would send Russia into a Communist age.
  • A Psychological Profile of Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov | Panes of Glass 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC panesofglass.org [Source type: General]

.On November 16 of that year, Dostoyevsky, along with the other members of the Petrashevsky Circle, was sentenced to death.^ On November 16 that year Dostoevsky, along with the other members of the Petrashevsky Circle, was sentenced to death .
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^ On November 16 that year he was sentenced to death for anti-government activities linked to a liberal intellectual group, the Petrashevsky Circle.
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^ On November 16 that year Dostoevsky, along with the other members of the Petrashevsky Circle, was sentenced to death.
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.After a mock execution, in which he and other members of the group stood outside in freezing weather waiting to be shot by a firing squad, Dostoyevsky's sentence was commuted to four years of exile with hard labor at a katorga prison camp in Omsk, Siberia.^ He spent four years in prison camp in Siberia and six years in the Army there.
  • Tricky minds | LRB essay | guardian.co.uk Books 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC books.guardian.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ After a mock execution, in which he and other members of the group stood outside in freezing weather waiting to be shot by a firing squad, Dostoevsky's sentence was commuted to four years of exile with hard labor at a katorga prison camp in Omsk, Siberia.
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^ Fortunately, Dostoevsky's sentence was changed to four years hard labor in the prison camp at Omsk, Siberia.
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.Dostoyevsky described later to his brother the sufferings he went through as the years in which he was "shut up in a coffin."^ Dostoevsky described later to his brother the sufferings he went through as the years in which he was "shut up in a coffin."
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^ In 1866, Dostoyevsky published Crime and Punishment , a novel of redemption through suffering that in many respects dramatizes the philosophic principles put forth in Notes from the Underground.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Philosophical Testament of Existentialism, existentialism and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the Realm of Existentialism at DividingLine.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dividingline.com [Source type: General]

^ I’m about 3/4 of the way through Anna Karenina .This is year two on that book, but I keep leaving it up at the deer camp.
  • A Psychological Profile of Ivan Fyodorovich Karamazov | Panes of Glass 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC panesofglass.org [Source type: General]

Describing the dilapidated barracks which, as his view, "should have been torn down years ago," he wrote:
.
In summer, intolerable closeness; in winter, unendurable cold.^ "In summer, intolerable closeness; in winter, unendurable cold.
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^ In summer, intolerable closeness; in winter, unendurable cold.
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^ In the summer it is unbearable hot, in the winter unbearable cold.

.All the floors were rotten.^ All the floors were rotten.
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.Filth on the floors an inch thick; one could slip and fall...We were packed like herrings in a barrel...There was no room to turn around.^ Filth on the floors an inch thick; one could slip and fall...We were packed like herrings in a barrel...There was no room to turn around.
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^ We are packed like herrings in a barrel.

^ On the ground filth lies an inch thick: every instant one is in danger of slipping.

.From dusk to dawn it was impossible not to behave like pigs...Fleas, lice, and black beetles by the bushel...^ From dusk to dawn it was impossible not to behave like pigs...Fleas, lice, and black beetles by the bushel..."
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^ From dusk to dawn it was impossible not to behave like pigs...Fleas, lice, and black beetles by the bushel...
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^ The atmosphere is intolerable: the prisoners stink like pigs: there are vermin by the bushel: we sleep upon bare boards."

[12]
.This experience inspired him to write "The House of the Dead."^ Instead of being executed, he was shipped off to four years at hard labor in Siberia—an experience chronicled in "The House of the Dead" (1862).
  • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

^ His 1860 book, The House of the Dead was based on these experiences.
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^ And it apparently worked: when Dostoevsky returned from Siberian prison (an experience he chronicled in the well-received House of the Dead ), he had switched sides completely.
  • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

.He was released from prison in 1854, and was required to serve in the Siberian Regiment.^ It was liberated of the prison in 1854, and he was demanded to serve in the Siberian Regiment.
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^ He was released from prison in 1854, and was required to serve in the Siberian Regiment.
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^ Dostoevsky had his sentence commuted to five years hard labor in Siberia, and subsequently served four more years of punishment as a common soldier in the Siberian regiment (1854-58).
  • FREE Study Guide-Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky-BIOGRAPHY-Free Booknotes Chapter Summary Plot Synopsis Notes Essay Book Report 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.pinkmonkey.com [Source type: General]

.Dostoyevsky spent the following five years as a private (and later lieutenant) in the Regiment's Seventh Line Battalion, stationed at the fortress of Semipalatinsk, now in Kazakhstan.^ A few years later Dostoyevsky was arrested.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Spotlight 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC spotlightradio.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Dostoevsky spent the following five years as a private (and later lieutenant) in the Regiment's Seventh Line Battalion, stationed at the fortress of Semipalatinsk, now in Kazakhstan.
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^ Dostoevsky spent the following five years as a private (and later lieutenant) in the Regiment's Seventh Line Battalion stationed at the fortress of Semipalatinsk, now in Kazakhstan.
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.While there, he began a relationship with Maria Dmitrievna Isayeva, the wife of an acquaintance in Siberia.^ While there, he began a relationship with Maria Dmitrievna Isaeva, the wife of an acquaintance in Siberia.
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^ While there, he began a relationship with Maria Dmitrievna Isaeva, the wife of an acquaintance in Siberia; they married in February 1857, after her husband's death.
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^ He also returned to the West with a wife, Maria Dmitrievna Isaeva, whom he married on 6 February, 1857.
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.They married in February 1857, after her husband's death.^ They married in February 1857, after her husband's death.
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^ While there, he began a relationship with Maria Dmitrievna Isaeva, the wife of an acquaintance in Siberia; they married in February 1857, after her husband's death.
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^ He also returned to the West with a wife, Maria Dmitrievna Isaeva, whom he married on 6 February, 1857.
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Post-prison maturation as a writer

Dostoyevsky (right) and the Kazakhstani scholar Shokan Walikhanuli in 1859
.Dostoyevsky's experiences in prison and the army resulted in major changes in his political and religious convictions.^ POST-PRISON MATURATION AS WRITER Dostoevsky's experiences in prison and the army resulted in major changes in his political and religious convictions.
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^ Dostoevsky's experiences in prison and the army resulted in major changes in his political and religious convictions.
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^ The House of the Dead by Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Accused of political subversion as a young man, Dostoyevsky was sentenced to 4 years of hard labor at a Siberian prison camp.
  • The Idiot ebook download Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.diesel-ebooks.com [Source type: General]

.First, his ordeal somehow caused him to become disillusioned with "Western" ideas; he repudiated the contemporary Western European philosophical movements, and instead paid greater tribute in his writing to traditional, rustic Russian values exemplified in the Slavophile concept of sobornost.^ Firstly, his ordeal somehow caused him to become disillusioned with 'Western' ideas; he repudiated the contemporary Western European philosophical movements, and instead paid greater tribute in his writing to traditional, rural-based, rustic Russian 'values'.
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^ He became disillusioned with 'Western' ideas, and began to pay greater tribute to traditional Russian values.
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^ Bakhtin’s views ( in Mikhail Bakhtin (Russian philosopher and literary critic) ) contemporary Russian criticism ( in Russia: Education and ideas ) Existentialist thought ( in Existentialism (philosophy): Nature of Existentialist thought and manner ) Gogol’s influence ( in Nikolay Gogol (Russian writer): Influence and reputation.
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.But even more significantly, he had what his biographer Joseph Frank describes as a conversion experience in prison, which greatly strengthened his Christian, and specifically Orthodox, faith (Dostoyevsky would later depict his conversion experience in the short story, The Peasant Marey (1876)).^ But even more significantly, he had what his biographer Joseph Frank describes as a conversion experience in prison, which greatly strengthened his Christian, and specifically Orthodox, faith (Dostoevsky would later depict his conversion experience in the short story, The Peasant Marey (1876)).
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^ But even more significantly, he had what his biographer Joseph Frank describes as a conversion experience in prison, which greatly strengthened his Christian , and specifically Orthodox , faith (Dostoevsky would later depict his conversion experience in the short story, The Peasant Marey (1876)).
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^ Perhaps most significantly, he had what his biographer Joseph Frank describes as a conversion experience in prison, which greatly strengthened his Christian, and specifically Orthodox, faith (the experience is depicted by Dostoevsky in The Peasant Marey ( 1876)).

In his writings, Dostoyevsky started to extol the virtues of humility, submission, and suffering.[13] .He now displayed a much more critical stance on contemporary European philosophy and turned with intellectual rigour against the Nihilist and Socialist movements; and much of his post-prison work—particularly the novel, The Possessed, and the essays, The Diary of a Writer—contains both criticism of socialist and nihilist ideas, as well as thinly-veiled parodies of contemporary Western-influenced Russian intellectuals (Timofey Granovsky), revolutionaries (Sergey Nechayev), and even fellow novelists (Ivan Turgenev).^ His character is based on the intellectual Timofey Granovsky.
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^ But he is a much more complex and interesting writer.
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^ Dostoevsky now displayed a much more critical stance on contemporary European philosophy and turned with intellectual rigour against the Nihilist and Socialist movements; and much of his post-prison work -- particularly the novel, The Possessed and the essays, The Diary of a Writer -- contains both criticism of socialist and nihilist ideas, as well as thinly-veiled parodies of contemporary Western-influenced Russian intellectuals ( Timofey Granovsky ), revolutionaries ( Sergey Nechayev ), and even fellow novelists ( Ivan Turgenev ).
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[14][15] .In social circles, Dostoyevsky allied himself with well-known conservatives, such as the statesman Konstantin Pobedonostsev.^ He later formed a peculiar friendship with the conservative statesman Konstantin Pobedonostsev .
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^ In social circles, Dostoevsky allied himself with well-known conservatives, such as the statesman Konstantin Pobedonostsev.
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^ In social circles, Dostoevsky allied himself with well-known conservatives, such as the statesman Konstantin Pobedonostsev .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.His post-prison essays praised the tenets of the Pochvennichestvo movement, a late-19th century Russian nativist ideology closely aligned with Slavophilism.^ His post-prison essays praised the tenets of the Pochvennichestvo movement, a late-19th Russian nativist ideology closely aligned with Slavophilism.
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^ His post-prison essays praised the tenets of the Pochvennichestvo movement, a late-19th century Russian nativist ideology closely aligned with Slavophilism .
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^ Dostoevsky's primary works, mainly novels, explore human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of his 19th-century Russian society.
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.Dostoyevsky's post-prison fiction abandoned the West-European-style domestic melodramas and quaint character studies of his youthful work in favor of dark, more complex story-lines and situations, played-out by brooding, tortured characters—often styled partly on Dostoyevsky himself—who agonized over existential themes of spiritual torment, religious awakening, and the psychological confusion caused by the conflict between traditional Russian culture and the influx of modern, Western philosophy.^ Dostoevsky's mature fiction explored themes of existentialism, spiritual torment, religious awakening and the psychological confusion caused by the conflict between traditional Russian culture and the influx of modern, Western philosophy.
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^ Dostoevsky's post-prison fiction abandoned the European-style domestic melodramas and quaint character studies of his youthful work in favor of dark, more complex story-lines and situations, played-out by brooding, tortured characters -- often styled partly on Dostoevsky himself -- who agonized over existential themes of spiritual torment, religious awakening, and the psychological confusion caused by the conflict between traditional Russian culture and the influx of modern, Western philosophy.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ While Dostoevsky's post-prison novels abandoned the European-style domestic melodrama and quaint character study which characterized his youthful work, this might also have been the result of his maturation and growing confidence in himself as a writer.
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.This, nonetheless, does not take from the debt which Dostoyevsky owed to earlier Western-influenced writers such as Gogol whose work grew from the irrational and anti-authoritarian spiritualist ideas contained within the Romantic movement which had immediately preceded Dostoyevsky in West Europe.^ This, nonetheless, does not take from the debt which Dostoevsky owed to the earlier (Western influenced within Russia Gogol ) writers whose work grew from out of the irrational and anti-authoritarian spiritualist ideas contained within the Romantic movement which had immediately preceded Dostoevsky in Europe.
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^ Dostoevsky focused his newfound condemnation of Western European philosophy especially on the Nihilist and Socialist movements; and much of his post-prison work -- particularly the novel, The Possessed and the essays, The Diary of a Writer -- contains both criticism of socialist and nihilist ideas, as well as thinly-veiled parodies of contemporary Western-influenced Russian intellectuals (Timofey Granovsky), revolutionaries (Sergey Nechayev), and even fellow novelists (Ivan Turgenev).
  • Great Russian Gifts and Nesting Dolls, RussianWriters6 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.greatrussiangifts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was born in Moscow in 1821, and when he died in 1881, he left a legacy of masterworks that influenced the great thinkers and writers of the Western world and immortalized him as a giant among writers of world literature.
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.However, Dostoyevsky's major novels focused on the idea that utopias and positivist ideas were unrealistic and unobtainable.^ Dostoevsky's novels focused on the idea that utopias and positivist ideas being utilitarian were unrealistic and unobtainable.
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^ I have always loved Dostoyevsky's major novels.
  • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Dostoevsky's novels focusing on the idea that utopias and positivists ideas being utilitarian were unrealistic and unobtainable.
  • Great Russian Gifts and Nesting Dolls, RussianWriters6 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.greatrussiangifts.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[16]

Later literary career

Dostoyevsky in 1863
.In December 1859, Dostoyevsky returned to Saint Petersburg, where he ran a series of unsuccessful literary journals, Vremya (Time) and Epokha (Epoch), with his older brother Mikhail.^ In December 1859, Dostoevsky returned to St. Petersburg, where he ran a series of unsuccessful literary journals, Vremya (Time) and Epokha (Epoch), with his older brother Mikhail.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In December 1859, Dostoevsky returned to St Petersburg, where he ran a series of unsuccessful literary journals, Vremya (Time) and Epokha (Epoch), with his older brother Mikhail.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author:Fyodor Dostoevsky - BookJive 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.bookjive.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In December 1859, Dostoevsky returned to Saint Petersburg , where he ran a series of unsuccessful literary journals, Vremya (Time) and Epokha (Epoch), with his older brother Mikhail.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The latter was shut down as a consequence of its coverage of the Polish Uprising of 1863.^ The latter had to be shut down as a consequence of its coverage of the Polish Uprising of 1863.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The latter had to be shut down as a consequence of its coverage of the Polish Uprising of 1863 .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Between the years 1861 and 1863 he served as editor of the monthly periodical Time , which was later suppressed because of an article on the Polish uprising.

.That year Dostoyevsky traveled to Europe and frequented the gambling casinos.^ That year Dostoevsky traveled to Europe and frequented the gambling casinos.
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  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ We traveled through Europe together gambling and .
  • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Motivated by the dual wish to escape his creditors at home and to visit the casinos abroad, Dostoevsky traveled to Western Europe .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.There he met Apollinaria Suslova, the model for Dostoyevsky's "proud women", such as the two characters named Katerina Ivanovna, in Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.^ Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and punishment .
  • Notes from underground. Poor people. The Friend of the family. By Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky), compilation & cover art: Dell Publishing Company & Western Printing and Lithographing Company, as employer in a work made for hire - song, music - Copyright Info 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faqs.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Dostoyevskys niece, Sofia Alexandrovna Ivanovna was also a model for the character of Sonia.
  • Free-Essays-Free-Essays.com - Life Of Fyodor Dostoyevsky In Crime And Punishment 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.free-essays-free-essays.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Crime and punishment 'is there not such a thing as crime ' .
  • Term Paper on Dostoyevsky. Free Dostoyevsky Essays and Research Papers 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dreamessays.com [Source type: General]

.Dostoyevsky was devastated by his wife's death in 1864, which was followed shortly thereafter by his brother's death.^ Dostoevsky was devastated by his wife's death in 1864, followed shortly thereafter by his brother's death.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - OrthodoxWiki 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC orthodoxwiki.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author:Fyodor Dostoevsky - BookJive 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.bookjive.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky was devastated by his wife's death in 1864, which was followed shortly thereafter by his brother's death.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ The Brothers Karamazov, completed in November 1880 just two months before Dostoyevsky’s death, displays both his mastery as a storyteller and his significance as a thinker.

.He was financially crippled by business debts; furthermore, he decided to assume the responsibility of his deceased brother's outstanding debts, and he also provided for his wife's son from her earlier marriage and his brother's widow and children.^ He was financially crippled by business debts and the need to provide for his wife's son from her earlier marriage and his brother's widow and children.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Author:Fyodor Dostoevsky - BookJive 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.bookjive.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was financially crippled by business debts and the need to provide for his brother's widow and children.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - OrthodoxWiki 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC orthodoxwiki.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was financially broken by the commercial debts and the necessity of maintaining their brother's widow and their children.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Dostoyevsky sank into a deep depression, frequenting gambling parlors and accumulating massive losses at the tables.^ Dostoevsky sank into a deep depression, frequenting gambling parlors and accumulating massive losses at the tables.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC nn-no.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author:Fyodor Dostoevsky - BookJive 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.bookjive.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky sank into a deep depression , frequenting gambling parlors and accumulating massive losses at the tables.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Soon he sank into deep thought, or more accurately speaking into a complete blankness of mind; he walked along not observing what was about him and not caring to observe it.
  • Crime & Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky - CD - WebStore item#2174902 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.webstore.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Dostoyevsky suffered from an acute gambling compulsion and its consequences.^ Dostoevsky suffered from an acute gambling compulsion as well as from its consequences.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ The guilt appeared in Dostoevskys compulsive gambling and the allure of redemption through winning and sufferable penance through losing.

.By one account he completed Crime and Punishment, possibly his best known novel, in a mad hurry because he was in urgent need of an advance from his publisher.^ The Idiot is one of the best if not the best novel I have ever read.
  • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ By one account Crime and Punishment, possibly his best known novel, was completed in a mad hurry because Dostoevsky was in urgent need of an advance from his publisher.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 1866, he published Crime and Punishment, one of his most popular works.
  • This Day in History 1849: Fyodor Dostoevsky is sentenced to death 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.history.com [Source type: General]
  • This Day in History 1849: Fyodor Dostoevsky is sentenced to death 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.history.com [Source type: General]

.He had been left practically penniless after a gambling spree.^ He had been left practically penniless after a gambling spree.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC pustakalaya.olenepal.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC nn-no.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Author:Fyodor Dostoevsky - BookJive 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.bookjive.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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.Dostoyevsky wrote The Gambler simultaneously in order to satisfy an agreement with his publisher Stellovsky who, if he did not receive a new work, would have claimed the copyrights to all of Dostoyevsky's writings.^ Dostoevsky wrote The Gambler simultaneously in order to satisfy an agreement with his publisher Stellovsky who, if he did not receive a new work, would have claimed the copyrights to all of Dostoevsky's writings.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ My favorite of all Dostoyevsky's works.
  • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Who would feed it and who would feed them all?
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.Motivated by the dual wish to escape his creditors at home and to visit the casinos abroad, Dostoyevsky traveled to Western Europe.^ To escape from the creditors in San Petersburgo, Dostoevsky traveled to Western Europe .
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Motivated by the dual wish to escape his creditors at home and to visit the casinos abroad, Dostoevsky traveled to Western Europe.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ In 1867, Dostoyevsky fled to Europe with his second wife to escape creditors.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.There, he attempted to rekindle a love affair with Suslova, but she refused his marriage proposal.^ There, he attempted to rekindle a love affair with Apollinaria (Polina) Suslova, a young university student with whom he had had an affair several years prior, but she refused his marriage proposal.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - OrthodoxWiki 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC orthodoxwiki.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There, he attempted to rekindle a love affair with Suslova, but she refused his marriage proposal.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There, he tried having again a loving adventure with Apollinaria (Polina) Suslova, a young university student with who had had a romance already before several years, but she refused to their marriage proposal.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Dostoyevsky was heartbroken, but soon met Anna Grigorevna Snitkina, a twenty-year-old stenographer.^ Dostoevsky was very heartbroken for this reason, but soon he met with Anna Snitkina, a nineteen year-old stenographer with which married in 1867.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky was heartbroken, but soon met Anna Grigorevna Snitkina, a twenty-year-old stenographer .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky was heartbroken, but soon met Anna Grigorevna Snitkina, a twenty-year-old stenographer.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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.Shortly before marrying her in 1867, he dictated The Gambler to her.^ Shortly before marrying her in 1867, he dictated The Gambler to her.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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.From 1873 to 1881 he published the Writer's Diary, a monthly journal of short stories, sketches, and articles on current events.^ From 1873 to 1881 he published the Writer's Diary, a monthly journal full of short stories, sketches, and articles on current events.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Of 1873 at 1881 he claimed their previous journalistic failures publishing a monthly newspaper full with short histories, sketches, and articles on the current events - the Writer's Newspaper.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ From 1873 to 1881 he published the Writer's Diary , a monthly journal full of short stories, sketches, and articles on current events.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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.The journal was an enormous success.^ The journal was an enormous success.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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.Dostoyevsky influenced and was influenced by the philosopher Vladimir Sergeyevich Solovyov.^ Dostoevsky is also known to have influenced and been influenced by famous Russian Philosopher Vladimir Sergeyevich Solovyov .
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - OrthodoxWiki 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC orthodoxwiki.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky is also known to have influenced and been influenced by the philosopher Vladimir Sergeyevich Solovyov.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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  • Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC geneticmatrix.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky is also known to have influenced and been influenced by the philosopher Vladimir Sergeyevich Solovyov .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Solovyov was the inspiration for the characters Ivan Karamazov and Alyosha Karamazov.^ Solovyov is noted as the inspiration for the character Alyosha Karamazov .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Solovyov is noted as the inspiration for the character Alyosha Karamazov.
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^ It is Ivan who is the most completely articulated of all the characters, and the one in whom Dostoevsky has expressed himself most fully; it is Ivan who tells Alyosha the story of The Grand Inquisitor .
  • Researching the Brothers Karamazov - Introductions: Anne Fremantle 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

[17]
.In 1877, Dostoyevsky gave the keynote eulogy at the funeral of his friend, the poet Nekrasov, to much controversy.^ In 1877 Dostoevsky he made the praise note in their friend's funeral, the poet Nekrasov, with a lot of controversy.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography - Chronology - Influence - Major works 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.fedordostoievsky.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 1877, Dostoevsky gave the keynote eulogy at the funeral of his friend, the poet Nekrasov, to much controversy.
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^ In 1877, Dostoevsky gave the keynote eulogy at the funeral of his friend, the poet Nekrasov , to much controversy.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.On 8 June 1880, shortly before he died, he gave his famous Pushkin speech at the unveiling of the Pushkin monument in Moscow.^ In 1880, shortly before he died, he gave his famous Pushkin speech at the unveiling of the Pushkin monument in Moscow.
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^ On June 8 , 1880 , shortly before he died, he gave his famous Pushkin speech at the unveiling of the Pushkin monument in Moscow.
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^ In June 1880 he made a valedictory speech at the unveiling of the Pushkin memorial in Moscow and received a tremendous ovation.
  • Researching the Brothers Karamazov - Introductions: Anne Fremantle 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: Original source]

[18]
.In his later years, Fyodor Dostoyevsky lived for a long time at the resort of Staraya Russa in northwestern Russia, which was closer to Saint Petersburg and less expensive than German resorts.^ In his later years, Fyodor Dostoevsky lived for a long time at the resort of Staraya Russa in northwestern Russia, which was closer to Saint Petersburg and less expensive than German resorts.
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^ Russian statistics and had lived a long time in Russia....
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ In his later years, Fyodor Dostoevsky lived for a long time at the resort of Staraya Russa, which was closer to St Petersburg and less expensive than German resorts.
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.He died on 9 February [O.S. 28 January] 1881 of a lung hemorrhage associated with emphysema and an epileptic seizure.^ He died on February 9 ( January 28 O.S. ), 1881 of a lung hemorrhage associated with emphysema and an epileptic seizure .
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^ He died on February 9 (January 28 O.S.), 1881 of a lung hemorrhage associated with emphysema and an epileptic seizure.
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^ Little more than six months later, on January 28, 1881, Dostoyevsky died of a lung hemorrhage.
  • Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Download - Barnes & Noble 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC search.barnesandnoble.com [Source type: General]

.He was interred in Tikhvin Cemetery at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery in Saint Petersburg.^ Dostoevsky's tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery.
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^ He was buried in the Aleksandr Nevsky monastery, St. Petersburg.
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  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was interred in Tikhvin Cemetery at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery, St Petersburg, Russia.
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.Forty thousand mourners attended his funeral.^ His funeral, attended by nearly thirty thousand mourners, was a national event.
  • Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Download - Barnes & Noble 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC search.barnesandnoble.com [Source type: General]

^ Forty thousand mourners attended his funeral.
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^ Forty thousand mourners attended his funeral.1 His tombstone reads "Verily, Verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit."
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[19] .His tombstone reads "Verily, Verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit."^ His tombstone reads "Verily, Verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit."
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^ Otherwise I had much else to say to you.

^ I took up the New Testament from the table, the Russian translation, and showed him the Gos- pel of St. John, chapter 12, verse 24: ‘Verily, verily, I say unto you, except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.’ I had just been reading that verse when he came in.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

from .John 12:24, which is also the epigraph of his final novel, The Brothers Karamazov.^ John 12:24 .
  • Tolstoy and Dostoevsky: Unifying the Christian Ontology 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.sras.org [Source type: Original source]

^ For the fifth chapter of novel The Brothers Karamazov .
  • Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC it.stlawu.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ John 12:24, which is also the epigraph of his final novel, The Brothers Karamazov.
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Works and influence

Dostoyevsky in 1879
.Some, like journalist Otto Friedrich,[20] consider Dostoyevsky to be one of Europe's major novelists, while others like Vladimir Nabokov maintain that from a point of view of enduring art and individual genius, he is a rather mediocre writer who produced wastelands of literary platitudes.^ Dostoyevsky is considered one of the greatest writers in world literature.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Among the resort?s guests were Fyodor Dostoyevsky -- who lost a fortune at the tables but left with the idea for his novel The Gambler -- and all the major an leaders of the time, including...
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

^ Dostoyevski's last work was Bratya Karamazovy (1880; The Brothers Karamazov ), a family tragedy of epic proportions, which is viewed as one of the great novels of world literature.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

[21] .Dostoyevsky promoted in his novels religious moralities, particularly those of Orthodox Christianity.^ In his fictionalized accounts of his epilepsy, particularly as portrayed through Myshkin, Dostoyevsky emphasises the reactions of those people who witness the seizures.
  • Diagnosing Dostoyevsky’s epilepsy « Neurophilosophy 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC neurophilosophy.wordpress.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Hence, much of the novel centers around the struggle for faith and the anti-religious ideas that threaten Christian society.
  • The Brothers Karamazov Study Guide : Major Themes | GradeSaver 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.gradesaver.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Daily Lit Fyodor Dostoyevsky ’s novel The Brothers Karamazov is one of those books that has eluded me so far: it’s pretty huge, and intimidating, and...
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

[6] .Nabokov argued in his University courses at Cornell, that such religious propaganda, rather than artistic qualities, was the main reason Dostoyevsky was praised and regarded as a 'Prophet' in Soviet Russia.^ Of course, you will note that I am speaking figuratively rather than literally.

^ Belinsky remarked that such atypical "psychopathic" characters belonged in madhouses rather than in works of art.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The author of course, feels the necessity of explaining to the reader why one is given his full title, while the other's name is abbreviated, if only that such a mode of expression may not be regarded as unseemly and rather familiar.

[21]
.Dostoyevsky influenced American novelist Ernest Hemingway, and James Joyce and Virginia Woolf praised his prose.^ American novelist Ernest Hemingway cited Dostoevsky as a major influence on his work in his autobiographical novella A Moveable Feast.
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^ In June of 1880, Dostoyevsky attended a celebration of the great novelist, Pushkin, during which he delivered a speech in praise of the writer.
  • Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Download - Barnes & Noble 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC search.barnesandnoble.com [Source type: General]

^ In a book of interviews with Arthur Power ( Conversations with James Joyce ), James Joyce praised Dostoevsky's influence: In her essay The Russian Point of View , Virginia Woolf stated that, Dostoevsky displayed a nuanced understanding of human psychology in his major works.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Hemingway cited Dostoyevsky as a major influence on his work, in his posthumous collection of sketches A Moveable Feast.^ American novelist Ernest Hemingway cited Dostoevsky as a major influence on his work in his autobiographical novella A Moveable Feast.
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^ American novelist Ernest Hemingway cited Dostoevsky as a major influence on his work in his autobiographical novella A Moveable Feast .
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^ Best Short Stories of Dostoyevsky Offers a collection of the Russian author's shorter fiction that features both his best known works and less familiar writing, including early sketches that reveal the development of his style and his understanding of psychology.
  • Results for Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC isbn.nu [Source type: General]

In a book of interviews with Arthur Power (Conversations with James Joyce), Joyce praised Dostoyevsky's prose:
.
...he is the man more than any other who has created modern prose, and intensified it to its present-day pitch.^ I’m more afraid of Ivan than the other.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ In a book of interviews with Arthur Power (Conversations with James Joyce), James Joyce praised Dostoevsky's influence: ...he is the man more than any other who has created modern prose, and intensified it to its present-day pitch.
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^ Among us it is only the exceptional classes who don't believe, those who, as Yevgeny Pavlovitch splendidly expressed it the other day, have lost their roots.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Wikiquote 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky - Wikiquote 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

It was his explosive power which shattered the Victorian novel with its simpering maidens and ordered commonplaces; books which were without imagination or violence.
In her essay The Russian Point of View, Virginia Woolf said:
.
The novels of Dostoevsky are seething whirlpools, gyrating sandstorms, waterspouts which hiss and boil and suck us in.^ In her essay The Russian Point of View, Virginia Woolf stated that, The novels of Dostoevsky are seething whirlpools, gyrating sandstorms, waterspouts which hiss and boil and suck us in.
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^ Virginia Woolf The novels of Dostoevsky are seething whirlpools, gyrating sandstorms, waterspouts which hiss and boil and suck us in.
  • Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Download - Barnes & Noble 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC search.barnesandnoble.com [Source type: General]

^ "The novels of Dostoevsky are seething whirlpools, gyrating sandstorms, waterspouts which hiss and boil and suck us in.
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.They are composed purely and wholly of the stuff of the soul.^ They are composed purely and wholly of the stuff of the soul.
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.Against our wills we are drawn in, whirled round, blinded, suffocated, and at the same time filled with a giddy rapture.^ Against our wills we are drawn in, whirled round, blinded, suffocated, and at the same time filled with a giddy rapture."
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^ Against our wills we are drawn in, whirled round, blinded, suffocated, and at the same time filled with a giddy rapture.
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^ You declare that you are afraid of nothing and at the same time try to in- gratiate yourself in our good opinion.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.Out of Shakespeare there is no more exciting reading.^ Out of Shakespeare there is no more exciting reading.
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^ There was no more fear.
  • Notes From the Underground › This blog is dedicated to providing news and analysis from the point of view of the “underground”. The title of this blog is borrowed from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel of the same name. 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.enotesunderground.com [Source type: News]

^ "Out of Shakespeare there is no more exciting reading."
  • Walmart.com: The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky, Fyodor M.: Literature & Fiction 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.walmart.com [Source type: General]

[22]
Dostoyevsky beside the Library Moscow
.Dostoyevsky displayed a nuanced understanding of human psychology in his major works.^ In a book of interviews with Arthur Power ( Conversations with James Joyce ), James Joyce praised Dostoevsky's influence: In her essay The Russian Point of View , Virginia Woolf stated that, Dostoevsky displayed a nuanced understanding of human psychology in his major works.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Though a writer of symbolic tales (and in this respect sometimes compared to Herman Melville), Dostoevsky displayed a nuanced understanding of human psychology in his major works.
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^ Best Short Stories of Dostoyevsky Offers a collection of the Russian author's shorter fiction that features both his best known works and less familiar writing, including early sketches that reveal the development of his style and his understanding of psychology.
  • Results for Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC isbn.nu [Source type: General]
  • Results for Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC isbn.nu [Source type: General]

.He created an opus of vitality and almost hypnotic power, characterized by feverishly dramatized scenes where his characters are frequently in scandalous and explosive atmospheres, passionately engaged in Socratic dialogues.^ He created an opus of vitality and almost hypnotic power, characterized by feverishly dramatized scenes where his characters are, frequently in scandalous and explosive atmosphere, passionately engaged in Socratic dialogues à la Russe ; the quest for God, the problem of Evil and suffering of the innocents haunt the majority of his novels.
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.The quest for God, the problem of Evil and suffering of the innocents haunt the majority of his novels.^ He created an opus of vitality and almost hypnotic power, characterized by feverishly dramatized scenes where his characters are, frequently in scandalous and explosive atmosphere, passionately engaged in Socratic dialogues à la Russe ; the quest for God, the problem of Evil and suffering of the innocents haunt the majority of his novels.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ The Legend of the Grand Inquisitor follows from Ivan Karamazov's “rebellion” against God's world, a world in which innocent children, as the extreme example, suffer for no evident reason.
  • The 'Legend of the Grand Inquisitor' 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.lurj.org [Source type: Original source]

^ For Dostoevsky, the gospel of suffering in communal love is the only lasting answer to the perennial problem of evil and thus to the perennial question of human freedom.

.His characters fall into a few distinct categories: humble and self-effacing Christians (Prince Myshkin, Sonya Marmeladova, Alyosha Karamazov, Starets Zosima), self-destructive nihilists (Svidrigailov, Smerdyakov, Stavrogin, the underground man)[citation needed], cynical debauchees (Fyodor Karamazov, Dmitri Karamazov), and rebellious intellectuals (Raskolnikov, Ivan Karamazov, Ippolit); also, his characters are driven by ideas rather than by ordinary biological or social imperatives.^ Discussion : The underground man and Ivan Karamazov .
  • "Dostoevsky as a social philosopher" - a course taught atMiami University by Costica Bradatan 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.webpages.ttu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His characters fall into a few distinct categories: humble and self-effacing Christians (Prince Myshkin, Sonya Marmeladova, Alyosha Karamazov, Starets Zosima), self-destructive nihilists (Svidrigailov, Smerdyakov, Stavrogin, the underground man), cynical debauchees (Fyodor Karamazov), and rebellious intellectuals (Raskolnikov, Ivan Karamazov); also, his characters are driven by ideas rather than by ordinary biological or social imperatives.
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^ His characters fall into a few distinct categories: humble and self-effacing Christians ( Prince Myshkin , Sonya Marmeladova , Alyosha Karamazov , Starets Zosima ), self-destructive nihilists ( Svidrigailov , Smerdyakov , Stavrogin , the underground man ), cynical debauchees ( Fyodor Karamazov ), and rebellious intellectuals ( Raskolnikov , Ivan Karamazov , Ippolit ); also, his characters are driven by ideas rather than by ordinary biological or social imperatives.
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.In comparison with Tolstoy, whose characters are realistic, the characters of Dostoyevsky are usually more symbolic of the ideas they represent, thus Dostoyevsky is often cited as one of the forerunners of Literary Symbolism, especially Russian Symbolism (see Alexander Blok).^ In comparison with Tolstoy, whose characters are realistic, the characters of Dostoevsky are usually more symbolic of the ideas they represent, thus Dostoevsky is often cited as one of the forerunners of Literary Symbolism in specific Russian Symbolism (see Alexander Blok).
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^ In comparison with Tolstoy , whose characters are realistic , the characters of Dostoevsky are usually more symbolic of the ideas they represent, thus Dostoevsky is often cited as one of the forerunners of Literary Symbolism in specific Russian Symbolism (see Alexander Blok ).
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^ Although they were distressing due to financial and personal difficulties, Dostoyevsky's years abroad were fruitful, for he completed one important novel and began another.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

Dostoyevsky beside the birthplace Moscow
.Dostoyevsky's novels are compressed in time (many cover only a few days) and this enables him to get rid of one of the dominant traits of realist prose, the corrosion of human life in the process of the time flux; his characters primarily embody spiritual values, and these are, by definition, timeless.^ Statue of Dostoyevsky in Omsk Dostoevsky's novels are compressed in time (many cover only a few days) and this enables the author to get rid of one of the dominant traits of realist prose, the corrosion of human life in the process of the time flux — his characters primarily embody spiritual values, and these are, by definition, timeless.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoevsky's novels are compressed in time (many cover only a few days) and this enables the author to get rid of one of the dominant traits of realist prose, the corrosion of human life in the process of the time flux — his characters primarily embody spiritual values, and these are, by definition, timeless.
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But as so often with Dostoyevsky, the characters are interesting not only in themselves but because they embody or reflect on greater ideas.
  • Classics Fyodor Dostoevsky : Read reviews and compare prices at Ciao.co.uk 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.ciao.co.uk [Source type: General]

.Other themes include suicide, wounded pride, collapsed family values, spiritual regeneration through suffering, rejection of the West and affirmation of Russian Orthodoxy and Tsarism.^ Other obsessive themes include suicide, wounded pride, collapsed family values, spiritual regeneration through suffering (the most important motif), rejection of the West and affirmation of Russian Orthodoxy and Tsarism.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Other obsessive themes include suicide , wounded pride, collapsed family values, spiritual regeneration through suffering (the most important motif), rejection of the West and affirmation of Russian Orthodoxy and Tsarism .
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Through the story of the brilliant but conflicted young Raskolnikov and the murder he commits, Fyodor Dostoevsky explores the theme of redemption through suffering.
  • Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Download - Barnes & Noble 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC search.barnesandnoble.com [Source type: General]

.Literary scholars such as Bakhtin have characterized his work as "polyphonic": Dostoyevsky does not appear to aim for a "single vision", and beyond simply describing situations from various angles, Dostoyevsky engendered fully dramatic novels of ideas where conflicting views and characters are left to develop unevenly into unbearable crescendo.^ Literary scholars such as Bakhtin have characterized his work as 'polyphonic': unlike other novelists, Dostoevsky does not appear to aim for a 'single vision', and beyond simply describing situations from various angles, Dostoevsky engendered fully dramatic novels of ideas where conflicting views and characters are left to develop unevenly into unbearable crescendo.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Among the resort?s guests were Fyodor Dostoyevsky -- who lost a fortune at the tables but left with the idea for his novel The Gambler -- and all the major an leaders of the time, including...
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

^ Dostoyevski's last work was Bratya Karamazovy (1880; The Brothers Karamazov ), a family tragedy of epic proportions, which is viewed as one of the great novels of world literature.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.Dostoyevsky and the other giant of late 19th century Russian literature, Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, never met in person, even though each praised, criticized, and influenced the other (Dostoyevsky remarked of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina that it was a "flawless work of art"; Henri Troyat reports that Tolstoy once remarked of Crime and Punishment that, "Once you read the first few chapters you know pretty much how the novel will end up").^ I didn’t know how much you were to him!
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I want to get to know you once for all, and I want you to know me.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Alyosha, you know, you are quite pretty!
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.August 2007" style="white-space:nowrap;">[citation needed] There was a meeting arranged, but there was a confusion about where the meeting place was to take place and they never rescheduled.^ There was, however, a meeting arranged, but there was a confusion about where the meeting place was and they never rescheduled.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Do you know that near one monastery there’s a place out- side the town where every baby knows there are none but ‘the monks’ wives’ living, as they are called.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ You are Tchatsky and she is Sofya, and, only fancy, I’ve run down to meet you on the stairs, and in the play the fatal scene takes place on the staircase.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.Tolstoy reportedly burst into tears when he learned of Dostoyevsky's death.^ Tolstoy reportedly burst into tears when he learnt of Dostoevsky's death.
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Oh, my dear, dear Alexey Fyodorovitch, perhaps that’s what’s most important,’ Madame Hohlakov cried, sudden- ly bursting into tears.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ He has gone now to fetch some rusks; he ...’ And suddenly I burst into tears.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.A copy of The Brothers Karamazov was found on the nightstand next to Tolstoy's deathbed at the Astapovo railway station.^ A copy of The Brothers Karamazov was found on the nightstand next to Tolstoy's deathbed at the Astapovo railway station.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Fyodor dostoyevsky encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • WikiSlice 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I have a soft cover copy of Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation (as well as a copy of a translation of this book by Constance Garnett and David Magarshack) This is the third translation that I have read of Dostoevsky's Brother's Karamazov.
  • The Brothers Karamazov: Amazon.ca: Fyodor Dostoevsky: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.ca [Source type: General]
  • The Brothers Karamazov: Amazon.ca: Fyodor Dostoevsky: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.ca [Source type: General]

^ By Count Leo Nikolayevich Tolstoy, newly translated and with a foreword by David Magarshack Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky 1821-1881 E. D. Magarshack (2 documents) example document: The Brothers Karamazov.
  • Notes from underground. Poor people. The Friend of the family. By Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky), compilation & cover art: Dell Publishing Company & Western Printing and Lithographing Company, as employer in a work made for hire - song, music - Copyright Info 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faqs.org [Source type: Reference]

Dostoyevsky's tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery

Dostoyevsky on Jews in Russia

Notable writers, e.g. .Joseph N. Frank, Stephen Cassady, David I. Goldstein, Gary Saul Morson, and Felix Dreizin, have offered various insights and unique suppositions regarding Dostoyevsky’s views on Jews and organized Jewry in Russia – specifically, that Dostoyevsky perceived Jewish ethnocentrism and Jewish influence to be directly threatening the Russian peasantry in the border regions.^ However, as Joseph Frank evaluates this so-called "conversion," it was "not faith in God or Christ…rather, it is a faith in the Russian common people.
  • Grace in the Arts: Dostoevsky and His Theology 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faithalone.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Writer's diary / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated and annotated by Kenneth Lantz ; with an introductory study by Gary Saul Morson.

^ Writer's diary / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; edited and with an introduction by Gary Saul Morson ; translated and annotated by Kenneth Lantz.

For example, in A Writer's Diary, Dostoyevsky wrote:
."Thus, Jewry is thriving precisely there where the people are still ignorant, or not free, or economically backward.^ He is an old man, almost ninety, Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 1 tall and erect, with a withered face and sunken eyes, in which there is still a gleam of light.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ N.B.) This would be still nothing, yet there is the rub, that indeed undoubtedly he would find followers, for thus so is man made.
  • DOSTOEVSKY: Berdyaev 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.krotov.info [Source type: Original source]

^ The first phase of married love Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 1 will pass, it is true, but then there will come a love that is better still.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

It is there that Jewry has a champ libre. .And instead of raising, by its influence, the level of education, instead of increasing knowledge, generating economic fitness in the native population—instead of this the Jew, wherever he has settled, has still more humiliated and debauched the people; there humaneness was still more debased and the educational level fell still lower; there inescapable, inhuman misery, and with it despair, spread still more disgustingly.^ The more I love humanity in general, the less I love man in particular.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the novel, the "Insulted and the Humiliated" ("Prestuplenii i nakazanii") there is nothing, except the revealing of the inner life of man, his experimenting over his unique nature and human nature in general, besides the discovering of all the possibilities and impossibilities, situated within man.
  • DOSTOEVSKY: Berdyaev 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.krotov.info [Source type: Original source]

^ And to Yefim Petrovitch, a man of a generosity and humanity rarely to be met with, the young people were more indebted for their education and bringing up than to anyone.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.Ask the native population in our border regions: What is propelling the Jew—and has been propelling him for centuries?^ Allow me to ask,’ he turned again to Alyosha, ‘what has brought you to our retreat?’ Alyosha looked attentively at him.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ We have all rested our hopes on you.’ ‘Tell me, what made you hope that I should be the one to find him?’ Kolya asked, with great curiosity.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.You will receive a unanimous answer: mercilessness.^ Even at this moment, as I think of you, I feel cheered, for always I can write letters to you, and put into them what I am feeling, and receive from you detailed answers....

^ Will you receive me as your guest?’ ‘You are welcome with all my heart,’ answered the Superior.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Will you receive me as your guest?’ ‘You are welcome with all my heart,’ answered the Su- perior.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.He has been prompted so many centuries only by pitilessness to us, only by the thirst for our sweat and blood."^ The basic contention - and it may account for the disdain many of us have for modern science - is that the only knowledge in the would that has any validity is knowledge derived from the positive sciences.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hate not the atheists, the teachers of evil, the materialists — and I mean not only the good ones — for there are many good ones among them, especially in our day — hate not even the wicked ones.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But then the beast will crawl to us and lick our feet and spatter them with tears of blood.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Grand Inquisitor by Fyodor Dostoyevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.mtholyoke.edu [Source type: Original source]

[23]
."And, in truth, the whole activity of the Jews in these border regions of ours consisted of rendering the native population as much as possible inescapably dependent on them, taking advantage of the local laws.^ We shall tell them that every sin will be expiated, if it is done with our permission, that we allow them to sin because we love them, and the punishment for these sins we take upon ourselves.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky "The Grand Inquisitor" 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Grand Inquisitor by Fyodor Dostoyevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.mtholyoke.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It is impossible within the limited expanse of an article to encompass the whole of Dostoevsky, but it is possible to take note of one of his themes, which suggests itself to me as central and from which he explains everything.
  • DOSTOEVSKY: Berdyaev 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.krotov.info [Source type: Original source]

^ He had to disentangle all this, to take it off as quickly as possible, to show himself to more advantage, for there is no one who does not prefer to show himself to advantage.

.They have always managed to be on friendly terms with those upon whom the people were dependent.^ They always gave me a cordial and friendly reception.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I was sent to the school by distant relations, upon whom I was dependent and of whom I have heard nothing since— they sent me there a forlorn, silent boy, already crushed by their reproaches, already troubled by doubt, and look- ing with savage distrust at everyone.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ But people also of another spiritual dimension wrote about Dostoevsky, they were more akin to him, of another generation, those peering into the spiritual distances: Vl.
  • DOSTOEVSKY: Berdyaev 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.krotov.info [Source type: Original source]

.Point to any other tribe from among Russian aliens which could rival the Jew by his dreadful influence in this connection!^ No other Russian writer of Dostoevsky's stature could equal the range of his familiarity with both the depths and heights of Russian society ” Read an excerpt from "Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time" .
  • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

^ I also have some connection with Russian people because some of my work colleagues are Russian ex-patriots (one even carries a family name mentioned at one point in 'The Idiot').
  • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.You will find no such tribe.^ No matter what there be in the world, you will find it all written down in Rataziaev's works.

^ Where did you find such a tailor in these parts?
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But you know there is no such thing as choice in reality, say what you like,’ you will interpose with a chuckle.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.In this respect the Jew preserves all his originality as compared with other Russian aliens, and of course, the reason therefore is that status of status of his, that spirit of which specifically breathes pitilessness for everything that is not Jew, with disrespect for any people and tribe, for every human creature who is not a Jew...."^ Of course, that’s all nonsense, of course every father would be reason- able at last.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Russian air she breathed that spirit and obtained that manner which the pas de châle would, one would have supposed, long ago have effaced?
  • Tolstoy and Dostoevsky: Unifying the Christian Ontology 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.sras.org [Source type: Original source]

^ For these pitiful creatures are concerned not only to find what one or the other can worship, but to find community of worship is the chief misery, of every man individually and of all humanity from the beginning of time.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky "The Grand Inquisitor" 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

[23]
.Dostoyevsky has been noted as having expressed anti-Semitic sentiments.^ Dostoevsky has also been noted as expressing anti-Semitic views.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In the recent biography by Joseph Frank, The Mantle of the Prophet, Frank spent much time on A Writer's Diary — a regular column which Dostoyevsky wrote in the periodical The Citizen from 1873 to the year before his death in 1881. Frank notes that the Diary is "filled with politics, literary criticism, and pan-Slav diatribes about the virtues of the Russian Empire, [and] represents a major challenge to the Dostoyevsky fan, not least on account of its frequent expressions of antisemitism."^ Dostoevsky : the mantle of the prophet, 1871-1881 / Joseph Frank.

^ Given such a background, Mr. Frank has avoided the usual sort of literary biography, the kind that strings together facts and anecdotes from a writer's public life.
  • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

^ Among the resort?s guests were Fyodor Dostoyevsky -- who lost a fortune at the tables but left with the idea for his novel The Gambler -- and all the major an leaders of the time, including...
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

[24] .Frank, in his foreword for the book Dostoevsky and the Jews, attempts to place Dostoyevsky as a product of his time.^ But faith in Christ formed the core of Dostoevsky's being and from it, as Mr. Frank shows, he confronted what he viewed as the ills and horrors—the demons—of his time.
  • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

^ Well I enjoyed reading Notes From Underground, by Fyodor Dostoevsky/Dostoyevsky, I found the structure of the book a little inhibiting.
  • Amazon.com: Notes from Underground (9780679734529): Fyodor Dostoevsky, Richard Pevear, Larissa Volokhonsky: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

^ Amazon.com: Crime and Punishment (Bantam Classics) (9780553211757): Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constance Garnett, Joseph Frank: Books .
  • Amazon.com: Crime and Punishment (Bantam Classics) (9780553211757): Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constance Garnett, Joseph Frank: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

.Frank notes that Dostoyevsky did make antisemitic remarks, but that Dostoyevsky's writing and stance by and large was one where Dostoyevsky held a great deal of guilt for his comments and positions that were antisemitic.^ Ivan, make a note of it, write it down.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dostoyevski's last work was Bratya Karamazovy (1880; The Brothers Karamazov ), a family tragedy of epic proportions, which is viewed as one of the great novels of world literature.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Making no explanation, as though I, as a sort of higher being, must understand everything without explanations, 1 Notes from the Underground she held out a piece of paper to me.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

[25] .Steven Cassedy, for example, alleges in his book, Dostoevsky's Religion, that much of the depiction of Dostoyevsky’s views as anti-Semitic omits that Dostoyevsky expressed support for the equal rights of the Russian Jewish population, a position that was not widely supported in Russia at the time.^ Dostoevsky has also been noted as expressing anti-Semitic views.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fyodor Dostoevsky at the Internet Book List Dostoyevsky 'Bookweb' on literary website The Ledge, with suggestions for further reading.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ No other Russian writer of Dostoevsky's stature could equal the range of his familiarity with both the depths and heights of Russian society ” Read an excerpt from "Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time" .
  • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

[26] .Cassedy also notes that this criticism of Dostoyevsky also appears to deny his sincerity when he said that he was for equal rights for the Russian Jewish populace and the Serfs of his own country (since neither group at that point in history had equal rights).^ Yes, if you like, everything is lawful since the word has been said, I wont deny it.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky "The Grand Inquisitor" 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ While the youth was at school, his father was murdered by his own serfs at the family's small country estate.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If you can read the texts in Russian, you are welcome and encouraged to do so, but you may still wish to acquire the assigned texts, since many of them contain critical material and notes that will be useful.
  • TOLSTOY AND DOSTOEVSKY 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC mosaic.echonyc.com [Source type: General]

[26] .Cassidy again notes when Dostoyevsky stated that he did not hate Jewish people and was not an Anti-Semite.^ In the notorious essay 'The Jewish Question' the author did not hide his anti-Semitism.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[26] .Even though Dostoyevsky spoke of the potential negative influence of Jewish people, Dostoyevsky advised Czar Alexander II to give them rights to positions of influence in Russian society, such as allowing them access to Professorships at Universities.^ They were well-to-do people of influence and position.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Directed reason on the other hand provides an orientation - an orientation that gives purpose and direction to inquiry - by allowing us to select from an infinite range of possibilities the right path - the right reason.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Russian people want thrashing, as Fyodor Pavlovitch said very truly yesterday, though he is mad, and all his children.’ ‘You said yourself you had such a respect for Ivan Fyodo- rovitch.’ ‘But he said I was a stinking lackey.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.According to Cassedy, labeling Dostoyevsky anti-Semitic does not take into consideration Dostoyevsky's expressed desire to peacefully reconcile Jews and Christians into a single universal brotherhood of all mankind.^ In filtering out the novelist’s theology from his writings, one must take into account the fact that not all Dostoevsky’s characters enunciate the author’s personal beliefs.
  • Grace in the Arts: Dostoevsky and His Theology 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faithalone.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He had to disentangle all this, to take it off as quickly as possible, to show himself to more advantage, for there is no one who does not prefer to show himself to advantage.

^ Dostoevsky has also been noted as expressing anti-Semitic views.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[26]

Dostoyevsky and Existentialism

.With the publication of Crime and Punishment in 1866, Dostoyevsky became one of Russia's most prominent authors.^ With the publication of Crime and Punishment in 1866, Fyodor Dostoevsky became one of Russia's most prominent authors in the nineteenth century.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky () 27.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

^ Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and punishment .
  • Notes from underground. Poor people. The Friend of the family. By Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky), compilation & cover art: Dell Publishing Company & Western Printing and Lithographing Company, as employer in a work made for hire - song, music - Copyright Info 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faqs.org [Source type: Reference]

.Will Durant, in The Pleasures of Philosophy, called Dostoyevsky one of the founding fathers of the philosophical movement known as existentialism, and cited Notes from Underground in particular as a founding work of existentialism.^ Dostoevsky has also been called one of the founding fathers of the philosophical movement known as existentialism.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In particular, his Notes from Underground , first published in 1864, has been depicted as a founding work of existentialism.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The shorter works of one of the world's greatest writers, including The Gambler and Notes from Underground The short works of Dostoevsky exist in the very large shadow of his astonishing longer novels, but they too are among literature's most revered works.
  • Books by Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Angus and Robertson 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.angusrobertson.com.au [Source type: General]
  • Books by Fyodor Dostoyevsky | Whitcoulls 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.whitcoulls.co.nz [Source type: General]

.For Dostoyevsky, war is the people's rebellion against the idea that reason guides everything, and thus, reason is not the ultimate guiding principle for either history or mankind.^ For Dostoevsky, war is the rebellion of the people against the idea that reason guides everything.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ And thus, reason is the ultimate principle of guidance for neither history nor mankind.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ War is described as people's rebellion against the assumption that everything needs to happen for a purpose, because humans do things without purpose, and this is what determines human history.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky Notes | Facebook 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.facebook.com [Source type: Original source]

.After his 1849 exile to the city of Omsk, Siberia, Dostoyevsky focused heavily on notions of suffering and despair in many of his works.^ Having been exiled to the city of Omsk (Siberia) in 1849, many of Dostoevsky's works entail notions of suffering and despair.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fyodor Dostoyevsky ’s Crime and Punishment was referenced (my host said that many locals knew the work.
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

Nietzsche referred to Dostoyevsky as "the only psychologist from whom I have something to learn: he belongs to the happiest windfalls of my life, happier even than the discovery of Stendhal." He said that Notes from Underground "cried truth from the blood." .According to Mihajlo Mihajlov's "The Great Catalyzer: Nietzsche and Russian Neo-Idealism", Nietzsche constantly refers to Dostoyevsky in his notes and drafts throughout the winter of 1886–1887. Nietzsche also wrote abstracts of several Dostoyevsky works.^ Nietzsche also wrote abstracts of several of Dostoevsky's works.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ According to Mihajlo Mihajlov's "The great catalyzer: Nietzsche and Russian neo-Idealism", Nietzsche constantly refers to Dostoevsky in his notes and drafts through out the winter of 1886-1887.
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dostoyevski's last work was Bratya Karamazovy (1880; The Brothers Karamazov ), a family tragedy of epic proportions, which is viewed as one of the great novels of world literature.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.Freud wrote an article titled "Dostoyevsky and Parricide", asserting that the greatest works in world literature are all about parricide; though he is critical of Dostoyevsky's work overall, his inclusion of The Brothers Karamazov among the three greatest works of literature is remarkable.^ About this edition: The Double is a remarkable work of doppelgänger literature.
  • Results for Fyodor Dostoyevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC isbn.nu [Source type: General]

^ Listen, Karamazov,  The Brothers Karamazov I’ll tell you all about it.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Freud wrote an article entitled Dostoevsky and Parricide that asserts that the greatest works in world literature are all about parricide (though he is critical of Dostoevsky's work overall, the inclusion of The Brothers Karamazov in a set of the three greatest works of literature is remarkable).
  • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

List of works

Novels

.
  • 1846 - Bednye lyudi (Бедные люди); English translation: Poor Folk
  • 1846 - Dvojnik (Двойник.^ BEDNYYE LYUDI, 1846 - POOR FOLK (transl.
    • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ He wrote two novels after this time, Poor Folk and The Double , both published in 1846.
    • UC Davis Philosophy 151 Lecture Notes, Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www-philosophy.ucdavis.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ However, his first novel, Poor Folk (1846), was so well received that he abandoned engineering for writing.
    • chapters.indigo.ca: Crime And Punishment: Fyodor Dostoevsky: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.chapters.indigo.ca [Source type: General]

    Петербургская поэма); English translation: The Double: A Petersburg Poem
  • 1849 - Netochka Nezvanova (Неточка Незванова); a proper feminine name, English transliteration: Netochka Nezvanova (Unfinished)
  • 1859 - Dyadyushkin son (Дядюшкин сон); English translation: The Uncle's Dream
  • 1859 - Selo Stepanchikovo i ego obitateli (Село Степанчиково и его обитатели); English translation: The Village of Stepanchikovo
  • 1861 - Unizhennye i oskorblennye (Униженные и оскорбленные); English translation: The Insulted and Humiliated
  • 1862 - Zapiski iz mertvogo doma (Записки из мертвого дома); English translation: The House of the Dead
  • 1864 - Zapiski iz podpolya (Записки из подполья); English translation: Notes from Underground
  • 1866 - Prestuplenie i nakazanie (Преступление и наказание); English translation: Crime and Punishment
  • 1867 - Igrok (Игрок); English translation: The Gambler
  • 1869 - Idiot (Идиот); English translation: The Idiot
  • 1870 - Vechnyj muzh (Вечный муж); English translation: The Eternal Husband
  • 1872 - Besy (Бесы); English translations: The Possessed; The Devils; Demons
  • 1875 - Podrostok (Подросток); English translation: The Raw Youth
  • 1881 - Brat'ya Karamazovy (Братья Карамазовы); English translation: The Brothers Karamazov

Novellas and short stories

  • 1846 - Gospodin Prokharchin (Господин Прохарчин); English translation: Mr. Prokharchin
  • 1847 - Roman v devyati pis'mah (Роман в девяти письмах); English translation: Novel in Nine Letters
  • 1847 - Hozyajka (Хозяйка); English translation: The Landlady
  • 1848 - Polzunkov (Ползунков); English translation: Polzunkov
  • 1848 - Slaboe serdze (Слабое сердце); English translation: A Weak Heart
  • 1848 - Chestnyj vor (Честный вор); English translation:) An Honest Thief
  • 1848 - Elka i svad'ba (Елка и свадьба); English translation: A Christmas Tree and a Wedding
  • 1848 - Chuzhaya zhena i muzh pod krovat'yu (Чужая жена и муж под кроватью); English translation: The Jealous Husband
  • 1848 - Belye nochi (Белые ночи); English translation: White Nights
  • 1849 - Malen'kij geroj (Маленький герой); English translation: A Little Hero
  • 1862 - Skvernyj anekdot (Скверный анекдот); English translation: A Nasty Story
  • 1865 - Krokodil (Крокодил); English translation: The Crocodile
  • 1873 - Bobok (Бобок); English translation: Bobok
  • 1876 - Krotkaja (Кроткая); English translation: A Gentle Creature
  • 1876 - Muzhik Marej (Мужик Марей); English translation: The Peasant Marey
  • 1876 - Mal'chik u Hrista na elke (Мальчик у Христа на ёлке); English translation: The Heavenly Christmas Tree
  • 1877 - Son smeshnogo cheloveka (Сон смешного человека); English translation: The Dream of a Ridiculous Man
.The last five stories (1873-1877) are included in A Writer's Diary.^ Indeed, if a man be a writer of short stories or anything else that is interesting, he can sometimes pocket five hundred roubles, or a thousand, at a time!

^ In his Dnevnik pisatelya (1873-1877; The Diary of a Writer ), initially a column in the Citizen but later an independent periodical, Dostoyevsky published a variety of prose works, including some of his outstanding short stories.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Dnevnik pisatelya (title means The Diary of a Writer Diary of a Writer ) (essays and short stories), [Russia], 1873-77; translated as A Writer's Diary, Writer's Diary, by Kenneth Lantz, Northwestern University Press, 1993.
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky Biography 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC people.brandeis.edu [Source type: Academic]

Non-fiction

  • Winter Notes on Summer Impressions (1863)
  • A Writer's Diary (Дневник писателя) (1873–1881)
  • Letters

See also

References

  1. ^ Dostoevsky's other Quixote.(influence of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote on Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Idiot) Fambrough, Preston
  2. ^ Pamuk, Orhan (2006). Istanbul: Memories of a City. Vintage Books. ISBN 978-1400033881. 
  3. ^ Pamuk, Orhan (2008). Other Colors: Essays and a Story. Vintage Books. ISBN 978-0307386236. 
  4. ^ loose phonetic pronunciation: fyo-der mi-(k)hail-a-vitch das-ta-yef-skee)
  5. ^ Existentialism from Dostoyevsky to Sartre Walter Kaufmann ISBN 0452009308 page 12
  6. ^ a b "Russian literature". Encyclopedia Britannica. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/513793/Russian-literature. Retrieved 2008-04-11. "Dostoyevsky, who is generally regarded as one of the supreme psychologists in world literature, sought to demonstrate the compatibility of Christianity with the deepest truths of the psyche." 
  7. ^ B.O. Unbegaun, Russkie familii (Moscow: "Univers"), pp. 28, 345.
  8. ^ Dostoyevsky, Aimée (2001), FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY: A STUDY, Honolulu, HAWAII: University Press of the Pacific, pp. 1, 6–7, ISBN 0898751659, http://worldcat.org/oclc/61397936 
  9. ^ The Best Short Stories of Dostoevsky: Translated with an Introduction by David Magarshack. New York: The Modern Library, Random House; 1971.
  10. ^ Notes from the Underground Coradella Collegita Bookshelf edition, About the Author.
  11. ^ epilepsy.com Famous authors with epilepsy.
  12. ^ Frank 76. Quoted from Pisma, I: 135-137.
  13. ^ Vladimir Nabokov (1981) Lectures on Russian Literature, lecture on Russian Writers, Censors, and Readers, p.14
  14. ^ Dostoevsky the Thinker James P. Scanlan. Dostoevsky the Thinker. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002. xiii, pp. 251
  15. ^ Dostoevsky's View of Evil Reprinted from In Communion, April 1998.
  16. ^ Sirotkina, Irina (1996). Diagnosing Literary Genius: A Cultural History of Psychiatry in Russia, 1880. Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 55. ISBN 0801867827. 
  17. ^ Zouboff, Peter, Solovyov on Godmanhood: Solovyov’s Lectures on Godmanhood Harmon Printing House: Poughkeepsie, New York, 1944; see Czeslaw Milosz’s introduction to Solovyov’s War, Progress and the End of History. Lindisfarne Press: Hudson, New York 1990.
  18. ^ az.lib.ru
  19. ^ Dostoevsky, Fyodor; Introduction to The Idiot, Wordsworth Ed. Ltd, 1996.
  20. ^ Otto Friedrich. "Freaking-Out with Fyodor". Time Magazine. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,943893,00.html?promoid=googlep. Retrieved 2008-04-10. 
  21. ^ a b Vladimir Nabokov (1981) Lectures on Russian Literature, lecture on Fyodor Dostoyevsky, p.68. Quote: "he is not a great writer, but a rather mediocre one—with flashes of excellent humor, but, alas, with wastelands of literary platitudes in between."
  22. ^ The Russian Point of View Virginia Woolf.
  23. ^ a b F. M. Dostoevsky, The Diary of a Writer, trans. Boris Brasol (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1949)
  24. ^ Dostoevsky's leap of faith This volume concludes a magnificent biography which is also a cultural history. Orlando Figes. Sunday Telegraph (London). Pg. 13. September 29, 2002.
  25. ^ Dostoevsky and the Jews (University of Texas Press Slavic series) (Hardcover) 2 Joseph Frank, "Foreword" pg. xiv. by David I. Goldstein ISBN 0292715285
  26. ^ a b c d Cassedy, Steven (2005). Dostoevsky's Religion. Stanford University Press. pp. 67–80. ISBN 0804751374. 

Biography

.
  • Frank, Joseph: 5 biographical volumes, Princeton University Press, c1976-2002.
  • Seeds of Revolt, 1821-1849.^ Dostoevsky : the seeds of revolt, 1821-1849 / Joseph Frank.

    ^ Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002.
    • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Book , Princeton University Press , 2002 Description .

    (c1976). ISBN 0691062609 (v. .1)
  • Years of Ordeal, 1850-1859.^ Joseph Frank, Dostoevsky: The Years of Ordeal 1850-1859 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983), 43.
    • Grace in the Arts: Dostoevsky and His Theology 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faithalone.org [Source type: Original source]

    ISBN 0691065764 (v. 2)
  • Stir of Liberation, 1860-1865. ISBN 0691066523 (v. .3)
  • Miraculous Years, 1865-1871 ISBN 0691043647 (v.^ Dostoevsky: The Miraculous Years, 1865-1871 .
    • TOLSTOY AND DOSTOEVSKY 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC mosaic.echonyc.com [Source type: General]

    .4)
  • Mantle of the Prophet, 1871-1881 (2002).^ Dostoevsky : The mantle of the prophet, 1871-1881 .
    • TOLSTOY AND DOSTOEVSKY 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC mosaic.echonyc.com [Source type: General]

    ^ In 1976 there appeared "Dostoevsky: The Seeds of Revolt, 1821-1849," followed by four further volumes of critical biography, culminating in 2002 with "Dostoevsky: The Mantle of the Prophet, 1871-1881."
    • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Dostoevsky : the mantle of the prophet, 1871-1881 / Joseph Frank.

    ISBN 0691086656 (v. .5)
  • Frank, Joseph, Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time.^ Joseph Frank, Dostoevsky: The Years of Ordeal 1850-1859 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983), 43.
    • Grace in the Arts: Dostoevsky and His Theology 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faithalone.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Amazon.com: Crime and Punishment (Bantam Classics) (9780553211757): Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constance Garnett, Joseph Frank: Books .
    • Amazon.com: Crime and Punishment (Bantam Classics) (9780553211757): Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constance Garnett, Joseph Frank: Books 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

    ^ By the time of The Brothers of Karamazov (1879-80), Dostoevsky was recognized in his own country as one of its great writers.
    • Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Princeton University Press.^ Joseph Frank, Dostoevsky: The Years of Ordeal 1850-1859 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983), 43.
    • Grace in the Arts: Dostoevsky and His Theology 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.faithalone.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1979-2003 (5 volumes).
    • Literate Lifetime - Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC literatelifetime.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Happily, Princeton University Press promises to keep all five volumes of the full biography in print.
    • Book Review: Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time - WSJ.com 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC online.wsj.com [Source type: General]

    2009. ISBN 9780691128191

External links



Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.
Man is a mystery: if you spend your entire life trying to puzzle it out, then do not say that you have wasted your time.
^ You say that aunt tried to stop her?
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ As soon as Alyosha reached the cross-roads the figure moved out and rushed at him, shouting savagely: ‘Your money or your life!’ ‘So it’s you, Mitya,’ cried Alyosha, in surprise, violently startled however.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If anything is wrong with your nose, they send you to Paris: there, they say, is a European specialist who cures noses.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

I occupy myself with this mystery, because I want to be a man.
Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский (born in Moscow on 1821-11-11 (1821-10-30 O.S.); died in St. Petersburg on 1881-02-09 (1881-01-28 O.S.)) was a Russian writer.
See also: Crime and Punishment

Contents

Sourced

It is not as a child that I believe and confess Jesus Christ. .My hosanna is born of a furnace of doubt.
  • To study the meaning of man and of life — I am making significant progress here.^ Three dozen of champagne for peasants, upon my word, that’s enough to make anyone angry!’ ‘That’s not what I mean.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I should like to tell you, dear friends, of that youth, my brother, for there has been no presence in my life more precious, more significant and touching.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You almost killed him — cursed him — and now — here — you’re making jokes — ‘Your money or your life!’’ ‘Well, what of that?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I have faith in myself.
    Man is a mystery: if you spend your entire life trying to puzzle it out, then do not say that you have wasted your time.^ You say that aunt tried to stop her?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Lies, lies, lies!’ Of course I have myself made up all the things you say.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As soon as Alyosha reached the cross-roads the figure moved out and rushed at him, shouting savagely: ‘Your money or your life!’ ‘So it’s you, Mitya,’ cried Alyosha, in surprise, violently startled however.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I occupy myself with this mystery, because I want to be a man.
    • Personal correspondence (1839), as quoted in Dostoevsky : His Life and Work (1971) by Konstantin Mochulski, as translated by Michael A. Minihan, p.^ Dostoevsky, the man and his work.

      ^ I think about that man because I am that man myself.
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Let me dig up the quote from The Idiot about epilepsy, because I think that's as close as we can get to Dostoevsky's own feelings on the matter.
      • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

      .17
  • If anyone could prove to me that Christ is outside the truth, and if the truth really did exclude Christ, I should prefer to stay with Christ and not with truth.
    • Letter To Mme.^ And so I want to prove to your face this evening that you are the only real murderer in the whole affair, and I am not the real murderer, though I did kill him.
      • Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 91 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.classicbookshelf.com [Source type: Original source]
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And so I want to prove to your face this evening that you are the only real murderer in the whole affair, and I am not the real murder- er, though I did kill him.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ To tell you the truth, I had supposed that YOU were jesting in your letter; wherefore, my heart was feeling heavy at the thought that you could feel so displeased with me.

      .N. D. Fonvisin (1854), as published in Letters of Fyodor Michailovitch Dostoevsky to his Family and Friends (1914), translated by Ethel Golburn Mayne, Letter XXI, p.^ Raw youth / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated from the Russian by Constance Garnett.

      ^ Devils / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated and edited by Michael R. Katz.

      ^ Poor people / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated by Hugh Aplin.

      .71
  • The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.
  • It is not as a child that I believe and confess Jesus Christ.^ House of the dead / by Fyodor Dostoyevsky ; translated by Constance Garnett ; introduction by Ernest J. Simmons.

    ^ House of the dead : a novel in two parts / from the Russian by Constance Garnett.

    ^ House of the dead / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated from the Russian by Constance Garnett.

    .My hosanna is born of a furnace of doubt.
    • As quoted in Kierkegaard, the Melancholy Dane (1950) by Harold Victor Martin.
  • The second half of a man's life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half.^ He saw nothing in life but sensual pleasure, and he brought his children up to be the same.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Suddenly he jerked up his head, listened a moment, and hearing nothing went up to the table, poured out half a glass of brandy from a decanter and drank it off.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nothing did I conceal as I told him about my friendship for him, about my desire to love him, about my scheme for living in sympathy with him and comforting him, and making his life easier.

    • As quoted in Peter's Quotations : Ideas for Our Time (1979) by Laurence J. Peter, p. 299.
  • Russia was a slave in Europe but would be a master in Asia.
    • As quoted in "Dilemmas of Empire 1850-1918: Power, Territory, Identity" by Dominic Livien in Journal of Contemporary History, Vol. 34, No.2 (April 1999), pp. 180.
.
If you want to be respected by others the great thing is to respect yourself.
^ You will know that yourself hereafter, for you will behold all things truly then and will not dispute them.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The second thing is that I don’t want to worm his se- cret out of him, but if he’ll tell me of himself to-day, I shall tell him straight out that I have promised to tell you.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ You won't want to spoil your life for ever by taking such a disgrace on yourself.
  • Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 91 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.classicbookshelf.com [Source type: Original source]

Only by that, only by self-respect will you compel others to respect you.

The Insulted and the Injured (1861)

  • If you want to be respected by others the great thing is to respect yourself. Only by that, only by self-respect will you compel others to respect you.

Notes from the Underground (1864)

.
The characteristics of our romantics are to understand everything, to see everything and to see it often incomparably more clearly than our most realistic minds see it...
  • I am a sick man… I am a spiteful man.^ The characteristics of our romantic are to understand everything, TO SEE EVERYTHING AND TO SEE IT OFTEN INCOMPARABLY MORE CLEARLY THAN OUR MOST REALISTIC MINDS SEE IT; to refuse to accept anyone or anything, but at the same time not to despise anything; to give way, to yield, from policy; never to lose sight of a useful practical object (such as rent-free quarters at the government expense, pensions, decorations), to keep their eye on that object through all the enthusiasms and volumes of lyrical poems, and at the same time to pre- serve ‘the sublime and the beautiful’ inviolate within them to the hour of their death, and to preserve themselves also, incidentally, like some precious jewel wrapped in cotton wool if only for the benefit of ‘the sublime and the beau- tiful.’ Our ‘romantic’ is a man of great breadth and the greatest rogue of all our rogues, I assure you ....
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They will see that we do not change the stones to bread, but in truth they will be more thankful for taking it from our hands than for the bread it- self!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And Russian man is more human than Western man.
    • DOSTOEVSKY: Berdyaev 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.krotov.info [Source type: Original source]

    I am an unpleasant man. I think my liver is diseased.
  • To be acutely conscious is a disease, a real, honest-to-goodness disease.
.
Above all, do not lie to yourself.
^ Above all, don’t lie to yourself.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.A man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus falls into disrespect towards himself and others.
  • The best definition of man is: a being that goes on two legs and is ungrateful.^ The man who wronged me, do I love him or not?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In fact, I believe that the best definition of man is the ungrateful biped.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Variant translation: If I had to define man it would be: a biped, ungrateful.
  • When… in the course of all these thousands of years has man ever acted in accordance with his own interests?
  • The formula 'two plus two equals five' is not without its attractions.
  • Yes — you, you alone must pay for everything because you turned up like this, because I'm a scoundrel, because I'm the nastiest, most ridiculous, pettiest, stupidest, and most envious worm of all those living on earth who're no better than me in any way, but who, the devil knows why, never get embarrassed, while all my life I have to endure insults from every louse — that's my fate.^ Never would I have married you!
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Who the devil can make you out?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You know I can’t live without Gru- sha!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .What do I care that you do not understand any of this?
  • I could never stand more than three months of dreaming at a time without feeling an irresistible desire to plunge into society.^ And to you more readily than to myself.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "You could not stand it, and have been to the Artemyevs?

    ^ Why are you not more careful?

    .To plunge into society meant to visit my superior, Anton Antonich Syetochkin.^ To plunge into society meant to visit my supe- rior at the office, Anton Antonitch Syetotchkin.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I gave up society and visited my neighbours much less frequently.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I had come into my own money, and so I flung myself into a life of pleasure, and plunged headlong into all the recklessness of youth.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .He was the the only permanent acquaintance I have had in my life, and I even wonder at the fact myself now.^ He was the only permanent acquaintance I have had in my life, and I wonder at the fact myself now.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Never in my life have I been so comfortable as now.

    ^ I hasten to emphasise the fact that I am far from esteeming myself capable of reporting all that took place at the trial in full detail, or even in the actual order of events.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But I even went to see him only when that phase came over me, and when my dreams had reached such a point of bliss that it became essential to embrace my fellows and all mankind immediately.^ But I only went to see him when that phase came over me, and when my dreams had reached such a point of bliss that it became essential at once to embrace my fellows and all mankind; and for that pur- pose I needed, at least, one human being, actually existing.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You see, I love him with all my soul, that’s how it is!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the evening, returning home in a savage and brutal humour, I flew into a rage with my or- derly Afanasy, and gave him two blows in the face with all my might, so that it was covered with blood.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .And for that purpose I needed at least one human being at hand who actually existed.^ Yet on one occasion I saw the poor old fellow actually turn pale on being told by his son not to touch the books.

    ^ But I only went to see him when that phase came over me, and when my dreams had reached such a point of bliss that it became essential at once to embrace my fellows and all mankind; and for that pur- pose I needed, at least, one human being, actually existing.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I should have respected myself because I should at least have been capable of being lazy; there would at least have been one quality, as it were, positive in me, in which I could have believed my- self.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I had to call on Anton Antonich, however, on Tuesday — his at-home day; so I always had to adjust my passionate desire to embrace humanity so that it might fall on a Tuesday.
  • Every man has some reminiscences which he would not tell to everyone, but only to his friends. He has others which he would not reveal even to his friends, but only to himself, and that in secret.^ He has other matters in his mind which he would not reveal even to his friends, but only to himself, and that in secret.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He came every day and talked to me as his only friend.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I had to call on Anton Antonitch, however, on Tuesday—his at-home day; so I had always to time my passionate desire to embrace humanity so that it might fall on a Tuesday.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But finally there are still others which a man is even afraid to tell himself, and every decent man has a considerable number of such things stored away.^ But there are other things which a man is afraid to tell even to himself, and every de- cent man has a number of such things stored away in his mind.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The more decent he is, the greater the number of such things in his mind.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is an old man, almost ninety, Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 1 tall and erect, with a withered face and sunken eyes, in which there is still a gleam of light.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .That is, one can even say that the more decent he is, the greater the number of such things in his mind.
  • The characteristics of our "romantics" are absolutely and directly opposed to the transcendental European type, and no European standard can be applied to them.^ No, I’ll say no more.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We need say no more about it.

    ^ The more decent he is, the greater the number of such things in his mind.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .(Allow me to make use of this word "romantic" — an old-fashioned and much respected word which has done good service and is familiar to all.^ It all depends on who makes use of it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ (Allow me to make use of this word ‘romantic’—an old-fashioned and much respected word which has done good service and is familiar to all.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ However, the author has told me that the work is old-fashioned, since, nowadays, books are issued with illustrations and embellishments of different sorts (though I could not make out all that he said).

    ) .The characteristics of our romantics are to understand everything, to see everything and to see it often incomparably more clearly than our most realistic minds see it; to refuse to accept anyone or anything, but at the same time not to despise anything; to give way, to yield, from policy; never to lose sight of a useful practical object (such as rent-free quarters at the government expense, pensions, decorations), to keep their eye on that object through all the enthusiasms and volumes of lyrical poems, and at the same time to preserve "the sublime and the beautiful" inviolate within them to the hour of their death, and to preserve themselves also, incidentally, like some precious jewel wrapped in cotton wool if only for the benefit of "the sublime and the beautiful."^ He practically acknowledged at the time that that was the only object of his visit.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What can be more precious than life?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It all rushed whirling through his mind.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Our "romantic" is a man of great breadth and the greatest rogue of all our rogues, I assure you ....^ He is not a man, I assure you, but an obstinate mule.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "He is not a man, I assure you, but an obstinate mule.
    • Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 91 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.classicbookshelf.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Paper, they say, does not blush, but I assure you it’s not true and that it’s blushing just as I am now, all over.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I can assure you from experience, indeed.^ I can as- sure you from experience, indeed.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    Of course, that is, if he is intelligent. But what am I saying! .The romantic is always intelligent, and I only meant to observe that although we have had foolish romantics they don't count, and they were only so because in the flower of their youth they degenerated into Germans, and to preserve their precious jewel more comfortably, settled somewhere out there — by preference in Weimar or the Black Forest.
  • It was not only that I could not become spiteful, I did not know how to become anything; neither spiteful nor kind, neither a rascal nor an honest man, neither a hero nor an insect.^ The romantic is always intelligent, and I only meant to observe that although we have had foolish romantics they don’t count, and they were only so because in the flower of their youth they degenerat- ed into Germans, and to preserve their precious jewel more comfortably, settled somewhere out there—by preference in 0 Notes from the Underground Weimar or the Black Forest.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The doctors are always confirming; they confirm, — anything.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was not only that I could not become spiteful, I did not know how to become anything; neither spiteful nor kind, neither a rascal nor an honest man, neither a hero nor an insect.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Now, I am living out my life in my corner, taunting myself with the spiteful and useless consolation that an intelligent man cannot become anything seriously, and it is only the fool who becomes anything.
  • Granted I am a babbler, a harmless vexatious babbler, like all of us.^ And what good is it all to us now?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am not out of my mind and I am not a fool.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I cannot answer for all my acquaintances....
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    But what is to be done if the direct and sole vocation of every intelligent man is babble, that is, the intentional pouring of water through a sieve?
  • To care only for well-being seems to me positively ill-bred. Whether it's good or bad, it is sometimes very pleasant, too, to smash things.

Crime and Punishment (1866)

These are just a few samples, for more quotes from this work see Crime and Punishment
  • Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.
.
Accept suffering and achieve atonement through it — that is what you must do.
  • Man grows used to everything, the scoundrel.
  • Talking nonsense is man's only privilege that distinguishes him from all other organisms.
  • "You're a gentleman," they used to say to him.^ But as to the rest you talk nonsense, nonsense, nonsense.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So you’re only stained, not wounded?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You’re bargaining with him for the copse, for the copse.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    "You shouldn't have gone murdering people with a hatchet; that's no occupation for a gentleman."
  • Do a man dirt, yourself you hurt.
  • Nothing in this world is harder than speaking the truth, nothing easier than flattery.
  • Accept suffering and achieve atonement through it — that is what you must do.
  • If not reason, then the devil.

The Idiot (1868)

It's life that matters, nothing but life — the process of discovering, the everlasting and perpetual process, not the discovery itself, at all.
.
Inventors and geniuses have almost always been looked on as no better than fools at the beginning of their career, and very frequently at the end of it also.
  • A widow, the mother of a family, and from her heart she produces chords to which my whole being responds.
  • It wasn't the New World that mattered ...^ You have gladdened my heart, mother.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She was better looked after than ever.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thou seest my whole heart...
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Columbus died almost without seeing it; and not really knowing what he had discovered.^ You yourself know that I am not addicted to bloodthirstiness, and therefore that I cannot really be guilty of the fault in question, seeing that neither my mind nor my heart have participated in it.

    .It's life that matters, nothing but life — the process of discovering, the everlasting and perpetual process, not the discovery itself, at all.
    But what's the use of talking!^ In the novel, the "Insulted and the Humiliated" ("Prestuplenii i nakazanii") there is nothing, except the revealing of the inner life of man, his experimenting over his unique nature and human nature in general, besides the discovering of all the possibilities and impossibilities, situated within man.
    • DOSTOEVSKY: Berdyaev 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.krotov.info [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I didn’t use the word ‘sir’ all my life, but as soon as I sank into low water I began to say ‘sir.’ It’s the work of a higher power.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And I say to myself, ‘What if I’ve been believing all my life, and when I come to die there’s nothing but the burdocks growing on my grave?’ as I read in some author.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I suspect that all I'm saying now is so like the usual commonplaces that I shall certainly be taken for a lower-form schoolboy sending in his essay on "sunrise", or they'll say perhaps that I had something to say, but that I did not know how to "explain" it.^ Mitya’ll be up to something now — I say!
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And how do you know it all beforehand?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now, however, I know all.

    .But I'll add, that there is something at the bottom of every new human thought, every thought of genius, or even every earnest thought that springs up in any brain, which can never be communicated to others, even if one were to write volumes about it and were explaining one's idea for thirty-five years; there's something left which cannot be induced to emerge from your brain, and remains with you forever; and with it you will die, without communicating to anyone perhaps the most important of your ideas.^ To-night, on New Year's Eve, every one is at home with his family.

    ^ I'll not be left penniless and alone when you swallow your tongue.
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What, you are turning up your nose again?
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But if I too have failed to convey all that has been tormenting me for the last six months, it will, anyway, be understood that I have paid very dearly for attaining my present "last conviction."^ It’s been going on nearly six months, and all at once I’ve thrown it off.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I wanted to spend my last day, my last hour in this room, in this very room ...
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But we know that for the last two months he has completely shared our conviction of his brother’s guilt and did not attempt to combat that idea.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .This is what I felt necessary, for certain objects of my own, to put forward in my "Explanation". However, I will continue.
  • Lack of originality, everywhere, all over the world, from time immemorial, has always been considered the foremost quality and the recommendation of the active, efficient and practical man...
  • To kill someone for committing murder is a punishment incomparably worse than the crime itself.^ And all that was certain, Alyosha felt that he was not exaggerating it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I swear by all that is sacred, I fully believe in the explanation of the murder I have just put forward.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Worse and better than all!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    Murder by legal sentence is immeasurably more terrible than murder by brigands.
.
There are two sorts of mind: one that matters, and one that doesn't matter.
  • Roman Catholicism is even worse than Atheism itself, in my opinion! Yes, that's my opinion!^ I even mentioned the matter of my shoes!

    ^ But argue as you may, you can't prevent my thinking that you would like there to be no one unhappy in the whole world when you are getting married.

    ^ And this is even truer in youth, for a young man who is always sensible is to be suspected and is of little worth — that’s my opinion!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    Atheism only preaches a negation, but Catholicism goes further: it preaches a distorted Christ, a Christ calumniated and defamed by themselves, the opposite of Christ! .It preaches the Antichrist, I declare it does, I assure you it does!^ So Thedora declares great happiness to be awaiting you, does she?

    ^ Paper, they say, does not blush, but I assure you it’s not true and that it’s blushing just as I am now, all over.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    This is the conviction I have long held, and it has distressed me, myself... .Roman Catholicism cannot hold its position without universal political supremacy, and cries: 'Non possumus!'^ They cannot behold the living God without hatred, and they cry out that the God of life should be annihilated, that God should de- stroy Himself and His own creation.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They cannot behold the living God without hatred, and they cry out that the God of life should be annihilated, that God should destroy Himself and His own creation.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .To my thinking Roman Catholicism is not even a religion, but simply the continuation of the Western Roman Empire, and everything in it is subordinated to that idea, faith to begin with.^ What, do you think, is an idea that sometimes enters my head?

    ^ One may say it is the most fun- damental feature of Roman Catholicism, in my opinion at least.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even to you, my dear one, I write simply and without tricks, but just as a thought may happen to enter my head.

    .The Pope seized the earth, an earthly throne, and grasped the sword; everything has gone on in the same way since, only they have added to the sword lying, fraud, deceit, fanaticism, superstition, villainy.^ They’re completely set up since then, I tell you, they used to be poor.’ He recalled, in fact, every item of expense and added it all up.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Christ, they will end by flooding the earth with blood, for blood cries out for blood, and he that taketh up the sword shall perish by the sword.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They aim at justice, but, denying Christ, they will end by flooding the earth with blood, for blood cries out for blood, and he that ta- keth up the sword shall perish by the sword.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .They have trifled with the most holy, truthful, sincere, fervent feelings of the people; they have bartered it all, all for money, for base earthly power.^ For the most part they were all timid people—of course, they were petitioners.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No, they are nonplussed in all sincerity.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I say nothing of the sufferings of grown-up people, they have eat- en the apple, damn them, and the devil take them all!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    And isn't that the teaching of Antichrist? .How could Atheism fail to come from them?^ How could one fail to understand?
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How could this money have come into your possession if it is the same money?’ the President asked wonderingly.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Moreover, how could I come and visit you frequently?

    Atheism has sprung from Roman Catholicism itself. It originated with them themselves. .Can they have believed themselves?^ And they will be glad to believe our answer, for it will save them from the great anxiety and terrible agony they endure at present in making a free decision for themselves.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    It has been strengthened by revulsion from them; it is begotten by their lying and their spiritual impotence! Atheism! .Among us it is only the exceptional classes who don't believe, those who, as Yevgeny Pavlovitch splendidly expressed it the other day, have lost their roots.^ There’s no phantom here, but only us two and one other.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Or perhaps they do bring babies from somewhere, but  The Brothers Karamazov only to those who are married.’ Kostya stared at Nastya and listened, pondering pro- foundly.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If they declare that it is they who are advancing towards unity, only the most simple-hearted among them believe it, so that one may positively marvel at such simplicity.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But over there, in Europe, a terrible mass of the people themselves are beginning to lose their faith — at first from darkness and lying, and now from fanaticism and hatred of the church and Christianity.
  • A fool with a heart and no sense is just as unhappy as a fool with sense and no heart.
  • It was evident that he revived by fits and starts.^ I was telling lies just now.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Women of the people are here too now, lying in the portico there waiting.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He went in and said straight out, ‘There is no God.’ To which the great bishop lifted up his finger and answered, ‘The fool has said in his heart there is no God and he fell down at his feet on the spot.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    He would suddenly come to himself from actual delirium for a few minutes; he would remember and talk with complete consciousness, chiefly in disconnected phrases which he had perhaps thought out and learnt by heart in the long weary hours of his illness, in his bed, in sleepless solitude.
  • Inventors and geniuses have almost always been looked on as no better than fools at the beginning of their career, and very frequently at the end of it also.
.
To achieve perfection, one must first begin by not understanding many things!
^ In 1812 there was a great in- vasion of Russia by Napoleon, first Emperor of the French, father of the present one, and it would have been a good thing if they had conquered us.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ She must knit me a scarf; look what a horrid one I've got, the nasty yellow thing, it did me a bad turn to-day!

^ In a few hours one can think of many things.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.And if we understand too quickly, we may not understand well.
  • I consider you the most honest and truthful of men, more honest and truthful than anyone; and if they say that your mind .^ Well, brother, you understand!

    ^ If you hadn't cared more for your dying wife than for me .
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You may as well know.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    . . that is, that you're sometimes afflicted in your mind, it's unjust. .I made up my mind about that, and disputed with others, because, though you really are mentally afflicted (you won't be angry with that, of course; I'm speaking from a higher point of view), yet the mind that matters is better in you than in any of them.^ I simply wanted to show you my point of view.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of course, you will note that I am speaking figuratively rather than literally.

    ^ Not really because the challenge is made in the other direction.
    • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It's something, in fact, they have never dreamed of.^ I accepted the books, but do not, even now, know what books they were, nor whether I looked into them, despite the fact that I never closed my eyes the whole night long.

    ^ But no-- I cannot say that I had NEVER foreseen it, for my mind DID get an inkling of what was coming, through my seeing something very similar to it in a dream.

    For there are two sorts of mind: one that matters, and one that doesn't matter.
The prince says that the world will be saved by beauty! .And I maintain that the reason he has such playful ideas is that he is in love.
  • I have never in my life met a man like him for noble simplicity, and boundless truthfulness. I understood from the way he talked that anyone who chose could deceive him, and that he would forgive anyone afterwards who had deceived him, and that was why I grew to love him.
  • Humiliate the reason and distort the soul...
  • Nor is there any embarrassment in the fact that we're ridiculous, isn't it true?^ The man who wronged me, do I love him or not?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why shouldn’t I develop him if I like him?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But there will be some like him as well.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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    .For it's actually so, we are ridiculous, light-minded, with bad habits, we're bored, we don't know how to look, how to understand, we're all like that, all, you, and I, and they!^ I don’t re- member.’ ‘You don’t remember?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Only Father, I don’t know what we’re to do with you.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And you know, Alyo- sha, I’ve been thinking all this time you were angry with me, because of the day before yesterday, because of that young lady.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Now, you're not offended when I tell you to your face that you're ridiculous?^ D: Just as you're trembling now?
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I’ll tell you now.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And in the saying of it you re-inforce your ridiculous moralising credentials.
    • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

    And if so, aren't you material? .You know, in my opinion it's sometimes even good to be ridiculous, if not better: we can the sooner forgive each other, the sooner humble ourselves; we can't understand everything at once, we cant start right out with perfection!^ You know, I sometimes like him.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You have once before been my benefactor.

    ^ You know what it all comes from from my having a good heart.

    .To achieve perfection, one must first begin by not understanding many things!^ Sitting in your invalid chair you must have thought over many things already.’ ‘Alyosha, give me your hand.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In 1812 there was a great in- vasion of Russia by Napoleon, first Emperor of the French, father of the present one, and it would have been a good thing if they had conquered us.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She must knit me a scarf; look what a horrid one I've got, the nasty yellow thing, it did me a bad turn to-day!

    .And if we understand too quickly, we may not understand well.
    This I tell you, you, who have already been able to understand.^ Well, brother, you understand!

    ^ You may as well know.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So you may as well know that I was laughing at you then.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .. and not understand ... so much. .I'm not afraid for you now;
  • Who consciously throws himself into the water or onto the knife?
  • The prince says that the world will be saved by beauty!^ It’s you he is throwing at now, not us.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I am not afraid of that now, I am not afraid of his knife.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And who can say of himself ‘I am holy’?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    And I maintain that the reason he has such playful ideas is that he is in love.
  • Pass by us, and forgive us our happiness.

The Possessed (1872)

Also known as The Devils Text at Project Gutenberg
.
  • Man is unhappy because he doesn't know he's happy.^ The lowest labourer hires himself as a work- Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 1 man, but he doesn’t make a slave of himself altogether; besides, he knows that he will be free again presently.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Another can never know how much I suffer, because he is another and not I. And what’s more, a man is rarely ready to admit another’s suffering (as though it were a distinction).
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Another can never know how much I suf- fer, because he is another and not I. And what’s more, a man is rarely ready to admit another’s suffering (as though it were a distinction).
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It's only that.
    • Part II, ch.^ The Idiot, Part II, Ch.
      • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

      .I
  • Hold your tongue; you won't understand anything.^ No, I won't part from you for anything."

    ^ And you hold your tongue.’ .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And you hold your tongue.’ And so it was.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .If there is no God, then I am God.
    • Kirilov, Part III, ch.^ As Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote in the Brothers Karamazov: "if there is no eternal God, then there is no virtue and, what's more, absolutely no need for it".
      • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Be not afraid of your sins, even when perceiving them, if only there be penitence, but make no conditions with God.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Hanging on a bitter aspen tree would be too good for, him.’ ‘There would have been no civilisation if they hadn’t in- vented God.’ ‘Wouldn’t there have been?
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      VI, "A busy night"

The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877)

Using primarily the translation of Constance Garnett (1916) - Full text at Wikisource
I am a ridiculous man. They call me a madman now. That would be a distinct rise in my social position were it not that they still regard me as being as ridiculous as ever.
.
I learnt the truth last November — on the third of November, to be precise — and I remember every instant since.
  • I am a ridiculous person.^ It is a long time (indeed I cannot remember when I last did so) since I visited a theatre!

    Now they call me a madman. .That would be a promotion if it were not that I remain as ridiculous in their eyes as before.^ He had, besides, a strong presentiment that something terrible would be the outcome of the situation that was developing before his eyes.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even though I knew it was only pretend, he would become a real monster before my very eyes.
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Every now and then sleep would cause me to nod, and objects grow dim before my eyes.

    .But now I do not resent it, they are all dear to me now, even when they laugh at me — and, indeed, it is just then that they are particularly dear to me.
    I could join in their laughter — not exactly at myself, but through affection for them, if I did not feel so sad as I look at them.^ They looked just the same as before.

    ^ He needs you particularly just now.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ They all went to look on.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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    .Sad because they do not know the truth and I do know it.^ And how many of them depart in solitude, unknown, sad, dejected that no one mourns for them or even knows whether they have lived or not!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ By the very fact that I respect you without envy I prove my dignity as a man.’ In truth if they don’t say this (for they don’t know how to say this yet), that is how they act.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I know nothing better than to be in the forest,’ said he, ‘though all things are good.’ ‘Truly,’ I answered him, ‘all things are good and fair, because all is truth.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Oh, how hard it is to be the only one who knows the truth!^ Yes, he knows how to torment one.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ He is the first, the only one who has pitied me, that’s what it is.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ You know how to console one.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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    But they won't understand that. .No, they won't understand it.
    • I
    • Variant translation: I am a ridiculous man.^ I won’t speak 11 Notes from the Underground of anything else, maybe you won’t understand, but tell me: no doubt you are in debt to your madam?
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ They’re begging because they’ve been burnt out.’ ‘No, no,’ Mitya, as it were, still did not understand.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
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      ^ They had no understanding of such essential things, they took no interest in such striking, im- pressive subjects, that I could not help considering them inferior to myself.
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      They call me a madman now. .That would be a distinct rise in my social position were it not that they still regard me as being as ridiculous as ever.
      But that does not make me angry any more.^ My best feelings, gratitude, for instance, are liter- ally denied me simply from my social position.’ * The devil does not exist.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Only fancy, this was two years after his insult to me, and my challenge would have been a ridiculous anachronism, in spite of all the ingenuity of my letter in disguising and explaining away the anachronism.
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I would have said more but I could not; my voice broke with the sweetness and youthful gladness of it, and there was such bliss in my heart as I had never known before in my life.
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      .They are all dear to me now even while they laugh at me — yes, even then they are for some reason particularly dear to me.^ Because they are all against me, while Dmitri Fyodorovitch is in debt to me, and not a little, but some thousands of which I have documentary proof.
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ It seemed to him that they were all brothers of his dear Vasya, that they were all worried and weeping about him.

      ^ I had not been treated like that even at school, though they all hated me.
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      .I shouldn't have minded laughing with them — not at myself, of course, but because I love them — had I not felt so sad as I looked at them.^ But of course that is because I do not respect myself.
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ He despises me,’ I thought; ‘he won’t even look at me.’ And I felt it so much at last that I wondered at myself for being so frightened of a boy.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Do you know, all this last month, I’ve been saying to myself, ‘Either we shall be friends at once, for ever, or we shall part enemies to the grave!’’ ‘And saying that, of course, you loved me,’ Alyosha laughed gaily.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      .I feel sad because they do not know the truth, whereas I know it.^ And how many of them depart in solitude, unknown, sad, dejected that no one mourns for them or even knows whether they have lived or not!
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I say this not out of pride, but because now I know how much you love me to be thus solicitous for my feelings.

      ^ I have spoken of this because I keep wanting to know for a fact whether other people feel such enjoyment?
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      .Oh, how hard it is to be the only man to know the truth!^ He knew how hard it would be for a man like Mitya to pass at once so suddenly into the society of robbers and murderers, and that he must get used to it by degrees.
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Oh, that is so natural; the unfortunate man has only too well deserved such prejudice.
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I am not a cultivated man, and I don’t even know how to address you properly, but you have been deceived and you have been too good-natured in letting us meet here.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      But they won't understand that. .No, they will not understand.
  • I gave up caring about anything, and all the problems disappeared.^ And they had no one to stand up for them.

    ^ No, they are nonplussed in all sincerity.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No one cares about it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]


    And it was after that that I found out the truth. .I learnt the truth last November — on the third of November, to be precise — and I remember every instant since.
    • I
  • The sky was horribly dark, but one could distinctly see tattered clouds, and between them fathomless black patches.^ Yet these last words he uttered so lingeringly that I could see he was ready to weep with vexation at finding the better sorts of books so expensive.

    ^ And for you, Afanasy Pavlovitch, I have prayed every day since that day, for it all came from you,’ said I. And I explained that to him as well as I could.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You see what a dark night, what clouds, what a wind has risen.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Suddenly I noticed in one of these patches a star, and began watching it intently.^ But now, these three sensualists are watching one another, with their knives in their belts.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A huge star like to a torch’ (that is, to a church) ‘fell on the sources of the waters and they became bitter.’ These heretics began 508 of 1631 .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A huge star like to a torch’ (that is, to a church) ‘fell on the sources of the waters and they became bitter.’ These heretics began blasphemously denying miracles.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .That was because that star had given me an idea: I decided to kill myself that night.^ I shall kill myself, because I loathe everything!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    • I
.
Dreams, as we all know, are very queer things: some parts are presented with appalling vividness, with details worked up with the elaborate finish of jewellery, while others one gallops through, as it were, without noticing them at all...
  • It seemed clear to me that life and the world somehow depended upon me now. I may almost say that the world now seemed created for me alone: if I shot myself the world would cease to be at least for me.^ I did a stupid thing, in the world’s opinion; but perhaps that one stupid thing may be the saving of us all now.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now, however, I know all.

    ^ I am alone in the world, and if I die, what will become of all of them?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I say nothing of its being likely that nothing will exist for anyone when I am gone, and that as soon as my consciousness is extinguished the whole world will vanish too and become void like a phantom, as a mere appurtenance of my consciousness, for possibly all this world and all these people are only me myself.^ If it is not of this world, then it cannot exist on earth at all.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am alone in the world, and if I die, what will become of all of them?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ D: But these conversations are my only happiness.
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    • II
.
They tease me now, telling me it was only a dream.
^ If you could only imagine what’s passing between them now — it’s awful, I tell you it’s lacerating, it’s like some incred- ible tale of horror.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Love will be sufficient only for a moment of life, but the very consciousness of its momentariness will intensify its fire, which now is dissipated in dreams of eternal love beyond the grave’...
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ I wanted to see her for one min- ute only; I wanted to tell her that it has been washed away, it has gone, that blood that was weighing on my heart all night, and that I am not a murderer now!
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.But does it matter whether it was a dream or reality, if the dream made known to me the truth?
  • Dreams, as we all know, are very queer things: some parts are presented with appalling vividness, with details worked up with the elaborate finish of jewellery, while others one gallops through, as it were, without noticing them at all, as, for instance, through space and time.^ And, as we all know, one can’t take a step without money.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And, after all, what does it matter whether it has a ceiling or hasn’t?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s a strong thing made from some herb.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Dreams seem to be spurred on not by reason but by desire, not by the head but by the heart, and yet what complicated tricks my reason has played sometimes in dreams, what utterly incomprehensible things happen to it!^ It’s strange how things happen sometimes.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet my heart had been bursting with grief.

    ^ What, do you think, is an idea that sometimes enters my head?

    .
    • II
  • Yes, I dreamed a dream, my dream of the third of November.^ D: Yes, in my dream, remember?
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .They tease me now, telling me it was only a dream.^ If you could only imagine what’s passing between them now — it’s awful, I tell you it’s lacerating, it’s like some incred- ible tale of horror.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love will be sufficient only for a moment of life, but the very consciousness of its momentariness will intensify its fire, which now is dissipated in dreams of eternal love beyond the grave’...
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps I was only dreaming then and didn’t see you really at all-.’ ‘And why were you so surly with Alyosha just now?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But does it matter whether it was a dream or reality, if the dream made known to me the truth?
    If once one has recognized the truth and seen it, you know that it is the truth and that there is no other and there cannot be, whether you are asleep or awake.^ There’s no knowing what you might build on it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There will be no one there, I can tell you that for certain.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There’s no one else.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Let it be a dream, so be it, but that real life of which you make so much I had meant to extinguish by suicide, and my dream, my dream — oh, it revealed to me a different life, renewed, grand and full of power!
    • II
  • I suddenly dreamt that I picked up the revolver and aimed it straight at my heart — my heart, and not my head; and I had determined beforehand to fire at my head, at my right temple.^ God help you make a difference.'
    • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It makes my heart yearn to look at you.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You think I meant to make her an offer?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .After aiming at my chest I waited a second or two, and suddenly my candle, my table, and the wall in front of me began moving and heaving.^ My mother began weeping, and, careful not to alarm my brother, she entreated him to go to church, to confess and take the sacrament, as he was still able to move about.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s night; I am in my room with a candle and suddenly there are devils all over the place, in all the corners, under the table, and they open the doors; there’s a crowd of them behind the doors and they want to come and seize me.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The room was nearly in darkness, for the candle was flickering, and throwing stray beams of light which suddenly illuminated the room, danced for a moment on the walls, and then disappeared.

    I made haste to pull the trigger. .
    • III
  • In dreams you sometimes fall from a height, or are stabbed, or beaten, but you never feel pain unless, perhaps, you really bruise yourself against the bedstead, then you feel pain and almost always wake up from it.^ Perhaps she really will be able to sleep after seeing you.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Do wake up, and collect yourself.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sometimes they have children, but if so, the children are always being brought up at a distance, at some aunt’s, to whom these gentlemen never allude in good society, seem- ing ashamed of the relationship.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    It was the same in my dream. .I did not feel any pain, but it seemed as though with my shot everything within me was shaken and everything was suddenly dimmed, and it grew horribly black around me.^ I drew myself up in my chair and feverishly seized my glass, prepared for some- thing extraordinary, though I did not know myself precisely what I was going to say.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But this I can say for certain: though I did that cruel thing purposely, it was not an impulse from the heart, but came from my evil brain.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But strange to say, everything that had happened to me in that day seemed to me now, on wak- ing, to be in the far, far away past, as though I had long, long ago lived all that down.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I seemed to be blinded, and it benumbed, and I was lying on something hard, stretched on my back; I saw nothing, and could not make the slightest movement.^ Purposely I kept looking about me for something upon which to fasten my thoughts, with which to distract, to encourage myself; but there was nothing.

    ^ To escape from their derision I purposely began to make all the progress I could  Notes from the Underground with my studies and forced my way to the very top.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But there was nothing for it; he could not take his words back, but his luck had served him before, it would serve him again.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    • III
.
The children of the sun, the children of their sun — oh, how beautiful they were!
  • On our earth we can only love with suffering and through suffering. We cannot love otherwise, and we know of no other sort of love.^ How can we blame children if they measure us according to our measure?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Indeed, many of the strongest feelings and movements of our nature we cannot compre- hend on earth.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The stream of callers was perpetual--although God only knows who they were, or what their business was.

    I want suffering in order to love. .I long, I thirst, this very instant, to kiss with tears the earth that I have left, and I don't want, I won't accept life on any other!"^ In one instant there was no trace left of her tears.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You are dear to me, I don’t want to let you go, and I won’t give you up to your Zossima.’ Ivan for a minute was silent, his face became all at once very sad.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My life won’t be long among you, I may not live another year,’ which seemed now like a prophecy.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • III
  • The children of the sun, the children of their sun — oh, how beautiful they were! Never had I seen on our own earth such beauty in mankind.^ How can we blame children if they measure us according to our measure?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How dare you, sir, how could you venture to disturb a lady who is a stranger to you, in her own house at such an hour!...
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Or, like little children, we brush the dreadful ghosts away and hide our heads in the pillow so as to return to our sports and merriment as soon as they have vanished.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Only perhaps in our children, in their earliest years, one might find, some remote faint reflection of this beauty.^ It was the largest grocery shop in our town, and by no means a bad one, belonging to some rich merchants.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One picture, only one more, because it’s so curious, so characteristic, and I have only just read it in some collec- tion of Russian antiquities.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I mean the elder one, to whom I bowed down.’ ‘I only saw him yesterday and could not find him today,’ said Alyosha.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    The eyes of these happy people shone with a clear brightness. .Their faces were radiant with the light of reason and fullness of a serenity that comes of perfect understanding, but those faces were gay; in their words and voices there was a note of childlike joy.^ There was a wrathful note in Kolya’s voice.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was a sarcastic, angry note in her voice.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was even a supercilious note in his voice.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Oh, from the first moment, from the first glance at them, I understood it all!^ Of course, all these nasty little suspicions as to the truth of her story only arose afterwards and at the first moment all were deeply impressed by it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Alyosha realised at the first glance, at the first word, that all the tragedy of her position in relation to the man she loved so dearly was no secret to her; that she perhaps already knew everything, positively everything.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She understood from all this what a woman understands first of all, if she feels genu- ine love, that is, that I was myself unhappy.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It was the earth untarnished by the Fall; on it lived people who had not sinned.^ If they, too, suffer horribly on earth, they must suffer for their fathers’ sins, they must be punished for their fathers, who have eaten the apple; but that reasoning is of the other world and is 487 of 1631 .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Write to me in fullest detail, both concerning your mode of life, and concerning the people who live with you, and concerning how you fare with them.

    ^ Even among the poor, honest people who live happily?’ ‘H’m ...
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .They lived just in such a paradise as that in which, according to all the legends of mankind, our first parents lived before they sinned; the only difference was that all this earth was the same paradise.^ They looked just the same as before.

    ^ And so in the first place, we will remember him, boys, all our lives.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The prosecutor and counsel for the defence began cross-ex- amining her, chiefly to ascertain what had induced her to conceal such a document and to give her evidence in quite a different tone and spirit just before.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .These people, laughing joyfully, thronged round me and caressed me; they took me home with them, and each of them tried to reassure me.^ He began playing these tricks, they say, as soon as he got home.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ People crowded in a close circle round him; they were all shaking their heads and lamenting.

    ^ At home he borrowed three roubles from the people of the house, who loved him so much that they were pleased to give it him, though it was all they had.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Oh, they asked me no questions, but they seemed, I fancied, to know everything without asking, and they wanted to make haste to smoothe away the signs of suffering from my face.^ They began asking him questions.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Fetyukovitch bowed with dignity and said that he had no more questions to ask of the witness.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of course, I shall give it back.’ The President intervened, but Fetyukovitch declared he had no more questions to ask of the witness.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    • III
.
They showed me their trees, and I could not understand the intense love with which they looked at them; it was as though they were talking with creatures like themselves.
  • Well, granted that it was only a dream, yet the sensation of the love of those innocent and beautiful people has remained with me for ever, and I feel as though their love is still flowing out to me from over there. I have seen them myself, have known them and been convinced; I loved them, I suffered for them afterwards.^ She could not, however, have been called a beauty, though she was tall, strong-looking, and well built.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I feel as though I were coming out of a dream.

    ^ They were well-to-do people of in- fluence and position.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Oh, I understood at once even at the time that in many things I could not understand them at all ...^ This time she understood it all.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But what could he understand even in this ‘laceration’?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All was confusion, confusion in Mitya’s soul, but al- though many things were goading his heart, at that moment his whole being was yearning for her, his queen, to whom he was flying to look on her for the last time.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But I soon realised that their knowledge was gained and fostered by intuitions different from those of us on earth, and that their aspirations, too, were quite different.^ But Ivan soon saw that, though the sun, moon, and stars might be an interesting subject, yet that it was quite secondary to Smerdyakov, and that he was looking for something altogether different.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They desired nothing and were at peace; they did not aspire to knowledge of life as we aspire to understand it, because their lives were full.^ If I don’t dare kill Smerdyakov now, life is not worth living!’ Ivan did not go home, but went straight to Katerina Ivanovna and alarmed her by his appearance.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After the scene was over, nothing further transpired between Aksenti Osipovitch and Peter Petrovitch, for the reason that the latter was so desirous of getting on in life that he held his tongue.

    ^ It was perhaps just because ideas I did not understand were surging up in me, that I used to drink and fight and rage.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But their knowledge was higher and deeper than ours; for our science seeks to explain what life is, aspires to understand it in order to teach others how to love, while they without science knew how to live; and that I understood, but I could not understand their knowledge.^ I could never understand how one can love one’s neighbours.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How could one fail to understand?
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How could you understand it?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • IV
  • They showed me their trees, and I could not understand the intense love with which they looked at them; it was as though they were talking with creatures like themselves.^ He is so in love with truth-.’ The visitor talked, obviously carried away by his own eloquence, speaking louder and louder and looking ironically at his host.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I had not been treated like that even at school, though they all hated me.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I could never understand how one can love one’s neighbours.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And perhaps I shall not be mistaken if I say that they conversed with them.^ Even if parallel lines do meet and I see it myself, I shall see it and say that they’ve met, but still I won’t accept it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What measure ye mete it shall be measured unto you again’ — it’s not I who say Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 1 that, it’s the Gospel precept, measure to others according as they measure to you.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I shall perhaps not be believed when I say that this jealous lover felt not the slightest jealousy of this new rival, who seemed to have sprung out of the earth.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    Yes, they had found their language, and I am convinced that the trees understood them. .They looked at all Nature like that — at the animals who lived in peace with them and did not attack them, but loved them, conquered by their love.^ They all went to look on.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But they are all like that.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If I die, who will care for them, and while I live who but they will care for a wretch like me?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .They pointed to the stars and told me something about them which I could not understand, but I am convinced that they were somehow in touch with the stars, not only in thought, but by some living channel.^ They told me, but I didn’t understand.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Purposely I kept looking about me for something upon which to fasten my thoughts, with which to distract, to encourage myself; but there was nothing.

    ^ They live only for mutual envy, for luxury and ostentation.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • IV
  • They had no temples, but they had a real living and uninterrupted sense of oneness with the whole of the universe; they had no creed, but they had a certain knowledge that when their earthly joy had reached the limits of earthly nature, then there would come for them, for the living and for the dead, a still greater fullness of contact with the whole of the universe.^ Why would they need one?
    • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And there would have been no brandy either.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is one of the representatives of a generation still living.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .They looked forward to that moment with joy, but without haste, not pining for it, but seeming to have a foretaste of it in their hearts, of which they talked to one another.^ They look at one another, and eat cabbages.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They looked at one another in joyful excitement.

    ^ What’s wrong with him?’ asked Alyosha, ‘Is he a telltale or what?’ The boys looked at one another as though derisively.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    • IV
.
The actual forms and images of my dream, that is, the very ones I really saw at the very time of my dream, were filled with such harmony, were so lovely and enchanting and were so actual, that on awakening I was, of course, incapable of clothing them in our poor language...
  • They sang the praises of nature, of the sea, of the woods. They liked making songs about one another, and praised each other like children; they were the simplest songs, but they sprang from their hearts and went to one's heart.^ My story about it is in today's Times .
    • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of course, they went with Karamazov at first.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They were like two enemies in love with one another.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .And not only in their songs but in all their lives they seemed to do nothing but admire one another. It was like being in love with each other, but an all-embracing, universal feeling.^ Only what offends me is that he doesn’t love me at all.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You and I seem to have seen nothing of one another.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They would forgive one another and would begin their lives afresh.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    • IV
.
How it could come to pass I do not know, but I remember it clearly.
^ How clearly I remember my youth!

^ How could I help knowing?
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ How I contrived to leave the house and, passing through Viborskaia Street, to reach the Voskresenski Bridge I do not know.

.The dream embraced thousands of years and left in me only a sense of the whole.
  • Oh, everyone laughs in my face now, and assures me that one cannot dream of such details as I am telling now, that I only dreamed or felt one sensation that arose in my heart in delirium and made up the details myself when I woke up.^ I woke up, and my dear one is close to me.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He made my heart ache.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I made up my mind to let it go at three thousand.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And when I told them that perhaps it really was so, my God, how they shouted with laughter in my face, and what mirth I caused!^ My God, how I hated him!
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yes, they certainly are poor--Oh, my God, how poor!

    ^ He told lies about me to my face.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Oh, yes, of course I was overcome by the mere sensation of my dream, and that was all that was preserved in my cruelly wounded heart; but the actual forms and images of my dream, that is, the very ones I really saw at the very time of my dream, were filled with such harmony, were so lovely and enchanting and were so actual, that on awakening I was, of course, incapable of clothing them in our poor language, so that they were bound to become blurred in my mind; and so perhaps I really was forced afterwards to make up the details, and so of course to distort them in my passionate desire to convey some at least of them as quickly as I could.^ Yes, at such times I slink along with a sense of utter humiliation in my heart.

    ^ And if that is so, if they dare not forgive, what becomes of harmony?
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s not as though it would be immediately; he will have time to make up his mind to it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But on the other hand, how can I help believing that it was all true?^ Yet, no matter how you may be fairing, you must not look for help from me, for only today I burned my left hand with the iron!

    ^ So I shall tell Mitya how you kissed my hand, but I didn’t kiss yours at all.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My heart, believe me, is able to appraise at its true worth all that you have done for me by protecting me from my enemies, and from hatred and persecution.

    .It was perhaps a thousand times brighter, happier and more joyful than I describe it.^ Did he not tell you anything about money — about three thousand roubles?’ ‘He did speak about it, and it’s that more than anything that’s crushing him.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I was perhaps worse than the rest in that respect, for I was so much more impressionable than my companions.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He educated them both at his own expense, and certainly spent far more than a thousand roubles upon each of them.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    Granted that I dreamed it, yet it must have been real. .You know, I will tell you a secret: perhaps it was not a dream at all!
    • IV
  • How it could come to pass I do not know, but I remember it clearly.^ You will know how to do that.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How could you know beforehand of the cellar?’ ‘You don’t seem able to get over that cellar!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s all like an ocean, I tell you.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The dream embraced thousands of years and left in me only a sense of the whole.
    I only know that I was the cause of their sin and downfall.^ Let him give me back only three out of the twenty- eight thousand, and he’ll draw my soul out of hell, and it will atone for many of his sins.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When she died, little Alexey was in his fourth year, and, strange as it seems, I know that he remembered his mother all his life, like a dream, of course.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When she died, little Alexey was in his fourth year, and, strange as it seems, I know that he remembered his moth- er all his life, like a dream, of course.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Like a vile trichina, like a germ of the plague infecting whole kingdoms, so I contaminated all this earth, so happy and sinless before my coming.^ Whether or not my refusal seemed to the company ridiculous I cannot say, but at all events my companions played the whole evening, and were playing when I left.

    ^ One of them is the prisoner before us, all the rest of my speech will deal with him.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I’ll always come to see you, all my life,’ answered Alyo- sha firmly.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    They learnt to lie, grew fond of lying, and discovered the charm of falsehood. .
    • V
  • All became so jealous of the rights of their own personality that they did their very utmost to curtail and destroy them in others, and made that the chief thing in their lives.^ They were all very fine.

    ^ And they are destroying others with them.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tell that to the person whom you hold dearest in the world.’ I had no sooner said this than they all three shouted at me.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    Slavery followed, even voluntary slavery; the weak eagerly submitted to the strong, on condition that the latter aided them to subdue the still weaker. .Then there were saints who came to these people, weeping, and talked to them of their pride, of their loss of harmony and due proportion, of their loss of shame.^ Who are these people?
    • Ruth Gledhill - Times Online - WBLG: Archbishop's welcome to 2010: 'A World Where There is Hope'. 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC timescolumns.typepad.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He sat in pride,’ the most malignant declared vindictively; ‘he considered himself a saint and he took it as his due when people knelt before him.’ ‘He abused the sacrament of confession,’ the fiercest opponents of the institution of elders added in a malicious whisper.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These people had been told many of their lodger’s secrets before, and so looked upon him as a gentleman who was not at all proud, and almost one of themselves.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    They were laughed at or pelted with stones.
    • V
.
I have seen the truth; I have seen and I know that people can be beautiful and happy without losing the power of living on earth.
^ Yet Lise has told me twice that she is never happy except with you.’ Alyosha raised his downcast eyes and again flushed, and again smiled without knowing why.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Humanity will find in itself the power to live for virtue even without believing in immortality.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I had the patience to sit like a fool beside these people for four hours at a stretch, listening to them without knowing what to say to them or venturing to say a word.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.I will not and cannot believe that evil is the normal condition of mankind.^ It ended by my almost believing (per- haps actually believing) that this was perhaps my normal condition.
  • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.And it is just this faith of mine that they laugh at.
  • Alas!^ Noth- ing will restrain them, they just force it along.’ ‘To hell?’ Mitya interrupted, and went off into his abrupt, short laugh.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Everything that was just, but oppressed and looked down upon, they laughed at heartlessly and shamefully.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Once—only once— they turned towards me, just when Zverkov was talking about Shakespeare, and I suddenly gave a contemptuous laugh.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    I always loved sorrow and tribulation, but only for myself, for myself; but I wept over them, pitying them. .I stretched out my hands to them in despair, blaming, cursing and despising myself.^ [Suddenly, his hands over his eyes, D walks between the singers out into the vestibule, followed immediately by MAIKOV] MAIKOV: Fedya, my friend .
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I will behave myself better, even if only out of respect for his Excellency, and guard my every action.

    ^ Then quietly I would slip out of the house to look at my beloved pond, and forget myself in contemplation.

    .I told them that all this was my doing, mine alone; that it was I had brought them corruption, contamination and falsity.^ All that and all my previous conversation with you at the gate the evening before, when I told you how 1273 of 1631 .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have now told you all, Makar Alexievitch, and feel sure that you will understand my despondency.

    ^ I know nothing of his whereabouts and don’t want to.’ ‘But my brother told me that you let him know all that goes on in the house, and promised to let him know when Agrafena Alexandrovna comes.’ .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    I besought them to crucify me, I taught them how to make a cross. .I could not kill myself, I had not the strength, but I wanted to suffer at their hands.^ I could not bear it, I should kill myself.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I won’t give him anything, not a penny, I want my money myself,’ cried the old man, waving his hand.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And I seem to have such strength in me now, that I think I could stand anything, any suffering, only to be able to say and to repeat to myself every moment, ‘I exist.’ In thousands of agonies — I exist.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I yearned for suffering, I longed that my blood should be drained to the last drop in these agonies.^ I had at one time spent some rather soulful moments with him, but these had not lasted long and had somehow been suddenly clouded over.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ During his last night he was especially lightheaded, for then he was in terrible agony, and kept rambling in his speech until my soul was torn with pity.

    ^ If it is not for the benefit of the public why should I not simply re- call these incidents in my own mind without putting them on paper?
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But they only laughed at me, and began at last to look upon me as crazy.^ They stopped to look at her, laughing, and began jesting with unbridled licentiousness.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I will only observe that Mitya looked upon Grushenka’s past as some- thing completely over.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have shed blood.’ They were splendid children, he longed to caress them; ‘and I can’t look at their innocent candid faces, I am unworthy.’ At last he began to be bitterly and ominously haunted by the blood of his murdered victim, by the young life he had destroyed, by the blood that cried out for vengeance.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They justified me, they declared that they had only got what they wanted themselves, and that all that now was could not have been otherwise.^ D: If only I could confess all to you .
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In old days we had all sorts, but now they have taken chiefly to moral punishments — ‘the stings of conscience’ and all that nonsense.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of all the wrangling, quarrelsome party, Dmitri was the only one who could regard the interview seriously.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .At last they declared to me that I was becoming dangerous and that they should lock me up in a madhouse if I did not hold my tongue.^ The incident did not become known at once, but when they came back to the town it penetrated to the school and even reached the ears of the masters.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I keep wondering why he took offence so suddenly, for I assure you, up to the last minute, he did not know that he was going to trample on the notes.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then you ought, as your father’s son, to have had me taken to the lock-up and thrashed at once for my words then...
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Then such grief took possession of my soul that my heart was wrung, and I felt as though I were dying; and then .^ D: With all my heart and soul.
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet my heart had been bursting with grief.

    ^ I tell you frankly, that thought, that venomous thought, so possessed my heart that it almost swooned with suspense.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    . . then I awoke.
    • V
  • I go to spread the tidings, I want to spread the tidings — of what? .Of the truth, for I have seen it, have seen it with my own eyes, have seen it in all its glory.
    • V
  • I have seen the truth; I have seen and I know that people can be beautiful and happy without losing the power of living on earth.^ I know this well--I know it of my own experience.

    ^ You know I can’t live without Gru- sha!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet Lise has told me twice that she is never happy except with you.’ Alyosha raised his downcast eyes and again flushed, and again smiled without knowing why.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I will not and cannot believe that evil is the normal condition of mankind.^ It ended by my almost believing (per- haps actually believing) that this was perhaps my normal condition.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .And it is just this faith of mine that they laugh at.
    But how can I help believing it?^ Noth- ing will restrain them, they just force it along.’ ‘To hell?’ Mitya interrupted, and went off into his abrupt, short laugh.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ People laugh and ask: ‘When will that time come and does it look like com- ing?’ I believe that with Christ’s help we shall accomplish this great thing.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You tell me so as to make me laugh, that's how you must tell me; I don't want anything important; or else you are no true friend of mine.

    .I have seen the truth — it is not as though I had invented it with my mind, I have seen it, seen it, and the living image of it has filled my soul for ever.^ Allow me, Father Superior, though I am a buffoon and play the buffoon, yet I am the soul of honour, and I want to speak my mind.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I was not long in coming to myself; everything came back to my mind at once, without an effort, as though it had been in ambush to pounce upon me again.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s just one’s neighbours, to my mind, that one can’t love, though one might love those at a distance.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I have seen it in such full perfection that I cannot believe that it is impossible for people to have it.^ Yet such dreams are sometimes seen not by writers, but by the most ordinary people, offi- cials, journalists, priests....
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But,’ reasonable people will exclaim perhaps, ‘every young man cannot believe in such a superstition and your hero is no model for others.’ To this I reply again, ‘Yes!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    • V
  • A dream! What is a dream? .And is not our life a dream? I will say more.^ I am sorry I can say nothing more consoling to you, for love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared with love in dreams.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And so I accept God and am glad to, and what’s more, I accept His wisdom, His purpose which are utterly beyond our ken; I believe in the underlying order and the meaning of life; I believe in the eternal harmony in which they say we shall one day be blended.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And so I accept God and am glad to, and what’s more, I accept His wisdom, His purpose which are utterly beyond our ken; I believe in the underlying order and the mean- ing of life; I believe in the eternal harmony in which they say we shall one day be blended.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Suppose that this paradise will never come to pass (that I understand), yet I shall go on preaching it.^ But I am going far away, and shall never come back....
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I simply beg you to go to Lise and find out everything from her, as you alone can, and come back and tell me — me, her mother, for you understand it will be the death of me, simply the death of me, if this goes on, or else I shall run away.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He could not take offence at this contempt, if it existed; yet, with an uneasy embarrassment which he did not himself understand, he waited for his brother to come nearer to him.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And yet how simple it is: in one day, in one hour everything could be arranged at once!^ How could one fail to understand?
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How dare you, sir, how could you venture to disturb a lady who is a stranger to you, in her own house at such an hour!...
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I could never understand how one can love one’s neighbours.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The chief thing is to love others like yourself, that's the chief thing, and that's everything; nothing else is wanted — you will find out at once how to arrange it all. And yet it's an old truth which has been told and retold a billion times — but it has not formed part of our lives!^ Yet how will it fare with you now?

    ^ I want to love you for ever.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How many times I have told you: Arkasha, it's really not funny, not funny at all!

    .The consciousness of life is higher than life, the knowledge of the laws of happiness is higher than happiness — that is what one must contend against.^ It will always be my one happiness in life.

    ^ I think everyone should love life above everything in the world.’ ‘Love life more than the meaning of it?’ ‘Certainly, love it, regardless of logic as you say, it must be regardless of logic, and it’s only then one will understand the meaning of it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ DEAREST LITTLE BARBARA,--It is YOU who have committed a fault-- and one which must weigh heavily upon your conscience.

    And I shall. If only everyone wants it, it can be arranged at once.
    • V

The Brothers Karamazov (1879 - 1880)

.
Beauty is a terrible and awful thing!
^ The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible.
  • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Beauty is a terrible and awful thing!
  • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

It is terrible because it has not been fathomed, for God sets us nothing but riddles.
Here the boundaries meet and all contradictions exist side by side.
.
In most cases, people, even the most vicious, are much more naive and simple-minded than we assume them to be.
^ Much more than that.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naive and simple-hearted than we suppose.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ She knew that His heart was open even to the simple, art- less merrymaking of some obscure and unlearned people, who had warmly bidden Him to their poor wedding.
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.And this is true of ourselves too.
  • Is there in the whole world a being who would have the right to forgive and could forgive? I don't want harmony.^ Brother,’ said Alyosha suddenly, with flashing eyes, ‘you said just now, is there a being in the whole world who would have the right to forgive and could forgive?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I don’t want harmony.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I don't want harmony.
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

    .From love for humanity I don't want it.^ From love for humanity I don’t want it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ From love for humanity I don't want it.
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I don’t want to be happy.’ ‘You are in love with disorder?’ ‘Yes, I want disorder.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I would rather be left with the unavenged suffering.^ I would rather be left with the unavenged suffering.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would rather remain with my unavenged suffering and unsatisfied indignation, even if I were wrong.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I would rather remain with my unavenged suffering and unsatisfied indignation, even if I were wrong.^ Then there would be an end to my sufferings.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would rather remain with my unavenged suffering and unsatisfied indignation, even if I were wrong .
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would rather be left with the unavenged suffering.
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Besides, too high a price is asked for harmony; it's beyond our means to pay so much to enter on it.^ Besides, too high a price is asked for harmony; it’s beyond our means to pay so much to enter on it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A: Even if it means delaying our wedding as much as a year?
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet I cannot help fearing that such an amusement is beyond our means.

    .And so I hasten to give back my entrance ticket, and if I am an honest man I am bound to give it back as soon as possible.^ And so I hasten to give back my entrance ticket, and if I am an honest man I am bound to give it back as soon as possible.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As soon as I turn my back he gives way to it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Will my brother Dmitri soon be back?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    And that I am doing. .It's not God that I don't accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return him the ticket.
  • The stupider one is, the closer one is to reality.^ It’s not God that I don’t accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return him the ticket.’ 503 of 1631 .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And secondly, the stupider one is, the closer one is to reality.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s not 0 The Brothers Karamazov God that I don’t accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return him the ticket.’ ‘That’s rebellion,’ murmered Alyosha, looking down.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The stupider one is, the clearer one is.^ The stupider one is, the clearer one is.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Stupidity is brief and artless, while intelligence wriggles and hides itself.^ Stupidity is brief and artless, while intelligence wriggles and hides itself.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Intelligence is a knave, but stupidity is honest and straightforward.
  • Fathers and teachers, I ponder, "What is hell?"^ Intelligence is a knave, but stupidity is honest and straight forward.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Fathers and teachers, I ponder, ‘What is hell?’ I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Intelligence is a knave, but stupidity is hon- est and straight forward.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.
    • Dostoevsky (1999) [1880].^ Fathers and teachers, I ponder, ‘What is hell?’ I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      The Brothers Karamazov. .Constance Garnett, translator.^ Grand inquisitor on the nature of man / Translated by Constance Garnett with an introduction by William Hubben.

      ^ Crime and punishment / translated from the Russian by Constance Garnett ; with an introd.

      ^ Possessed, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky; translated from the Russian by Constance Garnett; with a foreword by Avrahm Yarmolinsky.

      Signet Classic. pp. p. .312. ISBN 0451527348.
       
  • People talk sometimes of a bestial cruelty, but that's a great injustice and insult to the beasts; a beast can never be so cruel as a man, so artistically cruel. The tiger only tears and gnaws, that's all he can do.^ People talk sometimes of bestial cruelty, but that’s a great injustice and insult to the beasts; a beast can never be so cruel as a man, so artistically cruel.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The tiger only tears and gnaws, that’s all he can do.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Only fancy, this was two years after his insult to me, and my challenge would have been a ridiculous anachronism, in spite of all the ingenuity of my letter in disguising and explaining away the anachronism.
    • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .He would never think of nailing people by the ears, even if he were able to do it.
  • I think the devil doesn't exist, but man has created him, he has created him in his own image and likeness.
  • If you were to destroy in mankind the belief in immortality, not only love but every living force maintaining the life of the world would at once be dried up. Moreover, nothing then would be immoral; everything would be lawful, even cannibalism.^ Never would I have married you!
    • dostoevsky in love 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.csus.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When everything was over for him and nothing was possible!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Would you like some sweets?
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Variant translation : Everything is permitted.
    • Variant translation: All is lawful.
    • Paraphrased variant: If God does not exist, everything is permitted.^ The pity of it all is that, while you are depriving yourself of everything, I keep solacing myself with various amenities-- which is why I am telling you this, that the pangs of conscience may not torment me.

      ^ Yet would you believe it, in the final result I don’t accept this world of God’s, and, although I know it exists, I don’t accept it at all.
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Everything is lawful, is that it?’ Ivan scowled, and all at once turned strangely pale.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
      • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

      • This is a paraphrase of ideas presented in the story but this statement is not found within the work.
.
The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible.
^ The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible.
  • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Beauty is a terrible and awful thing!
  • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

.God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
  • Beauty is a terrible and awful thing!^ God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ God and the devil are fighting there and the battle- field is the heart of man.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It is terrible because it has not been fathomed, for God sets us nothing but riddles.^ It is terrible because it has not been fathomed and never can be fathomed, for God sets us nothing but riddles...
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is terrible because it has not been fathomed and never can be fathomed, for God sets us nothing but riddles.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And the son who breaks into his father’s house and murders him without murdering him is not even a romance- this is a sphinx setting us a riddle which he cannot solve him- self.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Here the boundaries meet and all contradictions exist side by side.
  • In most cases, people, even the most vicious, are much more naive and simple-minded than we assume them to be.^ Much more than that.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naive and simple-hearted than we suppose.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Here the boundaries meet and all contradictions exist side by side.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And this is true of ourselves too.
  • The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible.^ The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Beauty is a terrible and awful thing!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
  • Even those who have renounced Christianity and attack it, in their inmost being still follow the Christian ideal, for hitherto neither their subtlety nor the ardor of their hearts has been able to create a higher ideal of man and of virtue than the ideal given by Christ.
  • A man who lies to himself, and believes his own lies, becomes unable to recognize truth, either in himself or in anyone else, and he ends up losing respect for himself and for others.^ For even those who have renounced Christianity and attack it, in their inmost being still follow the Christian ideal, for hitherto neither their subtlety nor the ardour of their hearts has been able to create a higher ideal of man and of virtue than the ideal given by Christ of 348 of 1631 .
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For even those who have renounced Christianity and attack it, in their inmost being still follow the Chris- tian ideal, for hitherto neither their subtlety nor the ardour of their hearts has been able to create a higher ideal of man and of virtue than the ideal given by Christ of old.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .When he has no respect for anyone, he can no longer love, and in him, he yields to his impulses, indulges in the lowest form of pleasure, and behaves in the end like an animal in satisfying his vices.^ But the elder was no longer watching him.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I myself had told him long before that I did not love Dmitri, that I loved no one but him!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And to shelter him would be no bur- den, but, on the contrary, would probably be looked on as a pleasure.’ He did not finish his studies at the gymnasium.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .And it all comes from lying-to others and to yourself.
    • A more extensive variant translation: Above all, do not lie to yourself.^ Above all, don’t lie to yourself.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ She has very strong feelings and memories, and, what’s more, she uses these phrases, most unexpected words, which come out all of a sudden when you least expect them.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      .A man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus falls into disrespect towards himself and others.
      Not respecting anyone, he ceases to love, and having no love, he gives himself up to passions and coarse pleasures, in order to occupy and amuse himself, and in his vices reaches complete bestiality, and it all comes from lying continually to others and to himself.^ The man who wronged me, do I love him or not?
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ That is, not everyone, but all the clever people who come to him.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      .A man who lies to himself is often the first to take offense. It sometimes feels very good to take offense, doesn't it?^ Dostoevsky's nameless Underground Man is a babbling, contradictory narrator who spends the first half of the novella outlining his philosophy, and the second half illustrating it in practice.
      • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Notes from the Underground V C ome, can a man who attempts to find enjoyment in the very feeling of his own degradation possibly have a spark of respect for himself?
      • Notes from the Underground By Fyodor Dostoevsky 22 January 2010 11:43 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Somebody takes all the credit Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 101 of what’s good for Himself, and nothing but nastiness is left for me.
      • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      And surely he knows that no one has offended him, and that he himself has invented the offense and told lies just for the beauty of it, that he has exaggerated for the sake of effect, that he has picked on a word and made a mountain out of a pea — he knows all of that, and still he is the first to take offense, he likes feeling offended, it gives him great pleasure, and thus he reaches the point of real hostility… Do get up from your knees and sit down, I beg you, these posturings are false, too.
.
What terrible tragedies realism inflicts on people.
  • Men reject their prophets and slay them, but they love their martyrs and honor those they have slain.
  • So long as man remains free he strives for nothing so incessantly and so painfully as to find some one to worship.
  • If they drive God from the earth, we shall shelter Him underground.
  • Even there, in the mines, underground, I may find a human heart in another convict and murderer by my side, and I may make friends with him, for even there one may live and love and suffer.^ They are not men who do anything real.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even there, in the mines, underground, I may find a human heart in another con- vict and murderer by my side, and I may make friends with him, for even there one may live and love and suffer.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But there will be some like him as well.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .One may thaw and revive a frozen heart in that convict, one may wait upon him for years, and at last bring up from the dark depths a lofty soul, a feeling, suffering creature; one may bring forth an angel, create a hero!^ One may thaw and revive a frozen heart in that convict, one may wait upon him for years, and at last bring up from the dark depths a lofty soul, a feeling, suffering creature; one may bring forth an angel, create a hero!
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And how shall I, too, put up with the rabble out there, though they may be better than I, every one of them?
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Brothers Karamazov Chapter 3 The Sufferings of a Soul The First Ordeal A ND so Mitya sat looking wildly at the people round him, not understanding what was said to him.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .There are so many of them, hundreds of them, and we are to blame for them.
  • My feelings, gratitude, for instance, are denied me simply because of my social position.^ My best feelings, gratitude, for instance, are literally denied me simply from my social position.’ * The devil does not exist.
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My best feelings, gratitude, for instance, are liter- ally denied me simply from my social position.’ * The devil does not exist.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are so many of them, hundreds of them, and we are all to blame for them.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • The Devil (Ivan's Nightmare)
  • Do you know that ages will pass and mankind will proclaim in its wisdom and science that there is no crime and, therefore no sin, but that there are only hungry people.^ He has given us fire from heaven!’ Dost Thou know that the ages will pass, and humanity will proclaim by the lips of their sages that there is no crime, and therefore no sin; there is only hunger?
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ See, therefore, to what a pass you have brought me!

    ^ There’s no knowing what you might build on it.
    • The Brothers Karamazov By Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1880 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    'Feed them first and then demand virtue of them!' — that is what they will inscribe on their banner which they will raise against you and which will destroy your temple.
  • To be in love is not the same as loving. You can be in love with a woman and still hate her.
  • It's the great mystery of human life that old grief passes gradually into quiet tender joy.
  • The more I detest men individually the more ardent becomes my love for humanity.
  • What terrible tragedies realism inflicts on people.

On Dostoevsky

.
  • In the preface to an anthology of Russian literature, Vladimir Nabokov stated that he had not found a single page of Dostoevsky worthy of inclusion.^ Vladimir Nabokov once dismissed Dostoevsky entirely, saying that not a single page of his works was worthy of inclusion in any history of Russian literature.
    • Daily Kos: Literature for Kossacks: Fyodor Dostoevsky 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.dailykos.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dostoevsky's underground man in Russian literature.

    ^ Beyond those two stories, the rest found in this book are timeless masterpieces of the period of Russian literature.
    • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    .This ought to mean that Dostoevsky should not be judged by each page but rather by the total of all the pages that comprise the book.^ You ought not so to act, my friend, even though you write that you would rather sell your all than let me want for anything.

    ^ Some will have trouble maintaining interest in the book for all 350 pages, but for those willing to make it to page 300, the last 50 pages are the reward.
    • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    ^ Then, in a hundred or so pages, Dostoevsky all but forces us to see how alike they are.
    • Geometry.Net - Authors Books: Dostoevsky Fyodor 30 January 2010 2:02 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    • Jorge Louis Borges (trans. Eliot Weinberger), Preface to Dostoevsky's Demons in Borges's "A Personal Library" series; reported in Jorge Luis Borges – Selected Non-Fictions, Penguin Group: 1999.

Misattributed

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Simple English

File:Dostoevsky
Fyodor Dostoevsky. Portrait by Vasily Perov, 1872

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, Fëdor Mihajlovič Dostoevskij, sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky  listen (info • help)) (November 11,1821 (October 30, old style) – February 9,1881 (January 28,old style) was a Russian writer. Many people see him as one of the greatest of Russian writers. His works have had a big effect on twentieth-century fiction. Very often, he wrote about characters who live in poor conditions. Those characters are sometimes in extreme states of mind. They might show both a strange grasp of human psychology as well as good analyses of the political, social and spiritual states of Russia of Dostoevsky's time. Many of his best-known works are prophetic. He is sometimes considered to be a founder of existentialism, most frequently for Notes from Underground, which has been described by Walter Kaufmann as the best overture for existentialism ever written. He is also famous for writing The Brothers Karamazov, which many critics have suggested one of the best novels ever written.[needs proof]

Contents

List of works

Novels

  • 1846 - Bednye lyudi (Бедные люди); English translation: Poor Folk
  • 1846 - Dvojnik (Двойник. Петербургская поэма); English translation: The Double: A Petersburg Poem
  • 1849 - Netochka Nezvanova (Неточка Незванова); a proper feminine name, English transliteration: Netochka Nezvanova (Unfinished)
  • 1859 - Dyadushkin son (Дядюшкин сон); English translation: The Uncle's Dream
  • 1859 - Selo Steanchikovo i ego obitateli (Село Степанчиково и его обитатели); English translation: The Village of Stepanchikovo
  • 1861 - Unizhennye i oskorblennye (Униженные и оскорбленные); English translation: The Insulted and Humiliated
  • 1862 - Zapiski iz mertvogo doma (Записки из мертвого дома); English translation: The House of the Dead
  • 1864 - Zapiski iz podpolya (Записки из подполья); English translation: Notes from Underground
  • 1866 - Prestuplenie i nakazanie (Преступление и наказание); English translation: Crime and Punishment
  • 1867 - Igrok (Игрок); English translation: The Gambler
  • 1869 - Idiot (Идиот); English translation: The Idiot
  • 1870 - Vechnyj muzh (Вечный муж); English translation: The Eternal Husband
  • 1872 - Besy (Бесы); English translations: The Possessed; The Devils; Demons
  • 1875 - Podrostok (Подросток); English translation: The Raw Youth
  • 1881 - Brat'ya Karamazovy (Братья Карамазовы); English translation: The Brothers Karamazov

Novellas and short stories

  • 1846 - Gospodin Prokharchin (Господин Прохарчин); English translation: Mr. Prokharchin
  • 1847 - Roman v devyati pis'mah (Роман в девяти письмах); English translation: Novel in Nine Letters
  • 1847 - Hozyajka (Хозяйка); English translation: The Landlady
  • 1848 - Polzunkov (Ползунков); English translation: Polzunkov
  • 1848 - Slaboe serdze (Слабое сердце); English translation: A Weak Heart
  • 1848 - Chestnyj vor (Честный вор); English translation:) An Honest Thief
  • 1848 - Elka i svad'ba (Елка и свадьба); English translation: A Christmas Tree and a Wedding
  • 1848 - Chuzhaya zhena i muzh pod krovat'yu (Чужая жена и муж под кроватью); English translation: The Jealous Husband
  • 1848 - Belye nochi (Белые ночи); English translation: White Nights
  • 1849 - Malen'kij geroj (Маленький герой); English translation: A Little Hero
  • 1862 - Skvernyj anekdot (Скверный анекдот); English translation: A Nasty Story
  • 1865 - Krokodil (Крокодил); English translation: The Crocodile
  • 1873 - Bobok (Бобок); English translation: Bobok
  • 1876 - Krotkaja (Кроткая); English translation: A Gentle Creature
  • 1876 - Muzhik Marej (Мужик Марей); English translation: The Peasant Marey
  • 1876 - Mal'chik u Hrista na elke (Мальчик у Христа на ёлке); English translation: The Heavenly Christmas Tree
  • 1877 - Son smeshnogo cheloveka (Сон смешного человека); English translation: The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

The last five stories (1873-1877) are included in A Writer's Diary.

Non-fiction

  • Winter Notes on Summer Impressions (1863)
  • A Writer's Diary (Дневник писателя) (1873–1881)
  • Letters

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