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Gabor Rejto (1916–1987) was a renowned Hungarian cellist who performed with the finest artists and chamber music ensembles of, the 20th century.

Contents

Summary

Rejto was born in Budapest. His first 'cello teacher was Frederick Teller, a local teacher whose ideas, for the time, were exceptionally forward looking. At sixteen, Rejto entered the Academy of Music under Adolf Schiffer (a pupil of and later assistant to David Popper), and two years later, with his Artist’s Diploma, he began his European concert career.

Education

From the age of twenty, he studied with Pablo Casals for two years, first in Barcelona and then in Prades. Casals had revolutionized the approach to the 'cello and when he worked with Rejto, they spent almost a month on just basic technique. Rejto then played in concerts throughout Europe, with major symphony orchestras such as those in Vienna, Budapest, Rome and Warsaw, as well as in solo recitals.

Career

In 1952, Gabor Rejto and Yaltah Menuhin [1] undertook a tour of New Zealand together. Over a period of five weeks, they gave twenty-five concerts to great critical acclaim.

Rejto was a resident of the United States from 1939 until his death. During his career, he was on the faculty of the Manhattan and Eastman Schools of Music. From 1954 to his death he was professor of 'cello at the University of Southern California. He was also the 'cellist in the Paganini String Quartet and the Hungarian Quartet, and was a founding member of the Alma Trio. Mr. Rejto taught for a number of years at the Music Academy of the West summer program for gifted students, where his master classes were extremely popular, not just to cellists. His experience in chamber music attracted many students to his 'cello workshops held throughout the United States.

In 1972 Rejto was chosen Artist Teacher of the Year at the American String Teachers Association’s 25th Anniversary Conference. [2]

Gabor Rejto was a founding member of the Alma Trio, a piano trio, and remained with that ensemble from 1942 until it disbanded in 1976. The Alma Trio resumed performing for a few years in the early 1980s, mainly in the San Francisco Bay area.

Family

Rejto's son, Peter Rejto, is a cellist and a former faculty member at the Oberlin Conservatory. He was a founding member of the Los Angeles Piano Quartet. Gabor Rejto's daughter, Nika S. Rejto is a jazz flutist. She recently released a CD entitled "Teazing Socrates," which she dedicated to her late father, Gabor Rejto, who was chairman of the string department at USC Thornton School of Music. Her CD is available at: CD Baby.

Students

References

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External links

Books


Gabor Rejto (1916–1987) was a renowned Hungarian cellist who performed with the finest artists and chamber music ensembles of, the 20th century.

Contents

Summary

Rejto was born in Budapest. His first 'cello teacher was Frederick Teller, a local teacher whose ideas, for the time, were exceptionally forward looking. At sixteen, Rejto entered the Academy of Music under Adolf Schiffer (a pupil of and later assistant to David Popper), and two years later, with his Artist’s Diploma, he began his European concert career.

Education

From the age of twenty, he studied with Pablo Casals for two years, first in Barcelona and then in Prades. Casals had revolutionized the approach to the 'cello and when he worked with Rejto, they spent almost a month on just basic technique. Rejto then played in concerts throughout Europe, with major symphony orchestras such as those in Vienna, Budapest, Rome and Warsaw, as well as in solo recitals.

Career

In 1952, Gabor Rejto and Yaltah Menuhin [1] undertook a tour of New Zealand together. Over a period of five weeks, they gave twenty-five concerts to great critical acclaim.

Rejto was a resident of the United States from 1939 until his death. During his career, he was on the faculty of the Manhattan and Eastman Schools of Music. From 1954 to his death he was professor of 'cello at the University of Southern California. He was also the 'cellist in the Paganini String Quartet and the Hungarian Quartet, and was a founding member of the Alma Trio. Mr. Rejto taught for a number of years at the Music Academy of the West summer program for gifted students, where his master classes were extremely popular, not just to cellists. His experience in chamber music attracted many students to his 'cello workshops held throughout the United States.

In 1972 Rejto was chosen Artist Teacher of the Year at the American String Teachers Association’s 25th Anniversary Conference. [2]

Gabor Rejto was a founding member of the Alma Trio, a piano trio, and remained with that ensemble from 1942 until it disbanded in 1976. The Alma Trio resumed performing for a few years in the early 1980s, mainly in the San Francisco Bay area.

Family

Rejto's son, Peter Rejto, is a cellist and a former faculty member at the Oberlin Conservatory. He was a founding member of the Los Angeles Piano Quartet. Gabor Rejto's daughter, Nika S. Rejto is a jazz flutist. She recently released a CD entitled "Teazing Socrates," which she dedicated to her late father, Gabor Rejto, who was chairman of the string department at USC Thornton School of Music. Her CD is available at: CD Baby.

Students

References

External links

Books


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