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Game Boy Color
COLOR.png
Game Boy Color.jpg
Manufacturer Nintendo
Product family Game Boy line
Type Handheld game console
Generation Fifth generation era
Retail availability JP October 21, 1998
NA November 18, 1998
EU November 23, 1998
AUS November 23, 1998
Units sold Worldwide: 118.69 million,[1] including Game Boy units[2]
Media Cartridge
CPU Custom, Zilog Z80-alike
Best-selling game Pokémon Gold and Silver, approximately 14.51 million combined (in Japan and the US) (details).[3][4]
The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages, 3.96 million copies, and Oracle of Seasons, 3.96 million copies (as of March 2004).[5][6]
Backward
compatibility
Game Boy
Predecessor Game Boy Pocket
Successor Game Boy Advance

The Game Boy Color (ゲームボーイカラー Gēmu Bōi Karā"?) is Nintendo's successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan, November 19, 1998 in North America, November 23, 1998 in Europe and November 27, 1998 in UK. It features a color screen and is slightly thicker and taller than the Game Boy Pocket. As with the original Game Boy, it has an 8-bit processor.[7] The Game Boy and Game Boy Color combined have sold 118.69 million units worldwide.[1][2]

Contents

History

The Game Boy Color was a response to pressure from game developers for a new and much more sophisticated system of playing, as they felt that the Game Boy, even in its latest incarnation, the Game Boy Pocket, was insufficient. The resultant product was backward compatible, a first for a handheld system, and leveraged the large library of games and great installed base of the predecessor system. This became a major feature of the Game Boy line, since it allowed each new launch to begin with a significantly larger library than any of its competitors.

Specifications

The processor, which is a Z80 workalike made by Sharp with a few extra (bit manipulation) instructions, has a clock speed of approx. 8 MHz, twice as fast as that of the original Game Boy. The Game Boy Color also has four times as much memory as the original (32 kilobytes system RAM, 16 kilobytes video RAM). The screen resolution was the same as the original Game Boy, which is 160x144 pixels.

The Game Boy Color also featured an infrared communications port for wireless linking. However, the feature was only supported in a few games, and the infrared port was dropped for the Game Boy Advance and later releases. The console was capable of showing up to 56 different colors simultaneously on screen from its palette of 32,768, and could add basic four-color shading to games that had been developed for the original Game Boy. It could also give the sprites and backgrounds separate colors, for a total of more than four colors. This, however, resulted in graphic artifacts in certain games. For example, sometimes a sprite that was supposed to meld into the background would be colored separately, making it easily noticeable.

  • In Super Mario Land, there are many hidden sprites (in the form of hidden enemies/opportunities) exposed by using a multicolored palette. These and other "spoilers" can be avoided by using the monochromatic color palette as described below.
  • In The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (original version) there is an area full of statues, some of which are enemies and some of which are normal. The enemy statues blend in normally but the palette trick in the GBC makes them stand out.
  • In Pokémon Red and Blue, the inside of the Fuchsia City Gym contains a maze made of hidden walls which normally cannot be seen. These walls are exposed when using a multicolored palette. Additionally, trainers in dark caves that would normally be hidden can be displayed as silhouettes using certain palettes.

Cartridges

Games that are designed specifically for, and therefore will only work with, the Game Boy Color or the Game Boy Advance, are housed in clear-colored cartridges. Games that are designed for the Game Boy Color, but which also include backwards-compatibility with the previous Game Boy systems, have a similar design to the original grey Game Boy cartridges, but are colored black for identification. The European and American releases of Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Yellow feature different-colored cartridges, although they are technically identical to the standard black ones.

Color palettes used for original Game Boy games

When playing an original Game Boy game on a later system, the user can choose which color palette is used. This is achieved by pressing certain button combinations, namely either A or B (or neither) and a direction key while the Game Boy logo is displayed on the screen.

Key combination Palette Key combination Palette Key combination Palette
Up Brown Up + A Red Up + B Dark brown
Down Pastel mix Down + A Orange Down + B Yellow
Left Blue Left + A Dark blue Left + B Grayscale
Right Green Right + A Dark green Right + B Inverted

These palettes each contain up to ten colors.[8] In most games, the four shades displayed on the original Game Boy would translate to different subsets of this 10-color palette, such as by displaying movable sprites in one subset and backgrounds, etc. in another. The grayscale (Left + B) palette produces an appearance essentially identical to that experienced on the original Game Boy.

In addition, 89 Game Boy games have a special palette that is enabled when no buttons are pressed. Any game that does not have a special palette will default to the dark green (Right + A) palette. Notable games that do have preset palettes are Metroid II: Return of Samus, Kirby's Dream Land 2, Super Mario Land, Tetris, Bart Simpson's Escape from Camp Deadly and the Wario Land series. The default palettes are stored in a database within the internal boot rom of the GBC, and not the game cartridge itself.[9]

Super Game Boy titles will work too. Despite compatibility with Super Game Boy titles, the Game Boy Color will not recognize the coloring header for Super Game Boy titles which have a color graphics system of its own.

Colors produced

The Atomic Purple Game Boy Color system has a purple tinted translucent case. It is a standard color.

The logo for Game Boy Color spelled out the word COLOR in the five original colors in which the unit was manufactured. They were named:

  • Strawberry
  • Grape
  • Kiwi
  • Dandelion
  • Teal

Another color released at the same time was "Atomic Purple", made of a translucent purple plastic that was also used on the color-respective Nintendo 64 controller.

Other colors were sold as limited editions or in specific countries. These included:

  • Color-shifting gold/silver paint (Pokémon Gold/Silver edition)
  • Metallic gold/silver paint with a Pikachu & a Pichu around the screen. Pikachu's cheek lights up instead of the usual power light. (Pichu/Pikachu edition)
  • Yellow front, blue back with a red A button, a green B button, and a blue arrow. Has Poké Ball in place of power light. Has Pokémon logo above Start and Select buttons. Has pictures of Pikachu, Togepi, and Jigglypuff around screen (Pokémon edition)
  • Yellow front, blue back with a red A button, a green B button, and a blue arrow with a Pikachu & a Pichu around the screen. Pikachu's cheek lights up instead of the usual power light. (Pichu/Pikachu PAL edition)
  • Yellow or Red with one orange button, one green button, and a light blue arrow decorated in various Pokémon (Pokémon Center edition) (Japan)
  • Pastel pink with Hello Kitty head in the middle (Japan - Hello Kitty edition)
  • Yellow with Tommy Hilfiger Logo above Start/Select (Tommy Hilfiger edition)
  • Clear (Japan)
  • Clear black
  • Clear green (Japan)
  • Midnight blue
  • Ice blue
  • Clear orange (Japan, produced for Turkish soft drink company Yedigün)
  • Clear blue
  • Green and Yellow (Australian Edition)

Games

The last Game Boy Color game released in Japan that was also compatible with the Game Boy and Super Game Boy was From TV Animation - One Piece: Maboroshi no Grand Line Boukenhen! (July 2002). This gave the original Game Boy (1989–2002) one of the longest continuous lifespans of any console, only beaten by the Atari 2600 (1977–1992), and the Neo-Geo AES/MVS (1990–2004). Its North American lifespan was shorter though, as the last Game Boy and Super Game Boy compatible game released there was Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 (September 2001). However, the last Japanese Game Boy Color-exclusive game "Doraemon no Quiz Boy 2" was released in October 2002. In the US, the last game was Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (November 2002).

Sales

The Game Boy and Game Boy Color combined have sold 118.69 million units worldwide, with 32.47 million units in Japan, 44.06 million in the Americas, and 42.16 million in other regions.[1][2]

See also

References

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Category:Game Boy Color article)

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Game Boy Color
The logo for Game Boy Color.
The console image for Game Boy Color.
Manufacturer Nintendo
Active 19982002
Total Games 459 (67 present)
← Game Boy Game Boy Advance →

The Game Boy Color (also referred to as GBC) is Nintendo's successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States. It features a color screen and is slightly thicker and taller than the Game Boy Pocket, but smaller than the original Game Boy.

Contents

History

The Game Boy Color was a response to pressure from game developers for a new system, as they felt that the Game Boy, even in its latest incarnation, the Game Boy Pocket, was insufficient. The resultant product was backward compatible, a first for a handheld console system, and leveraged the large library of games and great installed base of the predecessor system. This became a major feature of the Game Boy line, since it allowed each new launch to begin with a significantly larger library than any of its competitors.

Specifications

The processor, which is a Zilog Z80, has a clock speed twice as fast as that of the original Game Boy. The Game Boy Color also has three times as much memory as the original.

The Game Boy Color also featured an infrared communications port for wireless linking. However, the feature was only supported in a few games, and the infrared port was dropped for the Game Boy Advance and later releases. The console was capable of showing up to 56 different colors simultaneously on screen from its palette of 32,768, and could add basic four-color shading to games that had been developed for the original Game Boy. It could also give the sprites and backgrounds separate colors, for a total of more than four colors. This, however, resulted in graphic artifacts in certain games; a sprite that was supposed to meld into the background was now colored separately, exposing the trick.

  • One such trick occurred in Pokémon Red and Blue. Players were supposed to navigate through Koga's gym by feeling around invisible walls and encountering rival trainers in the gym. On the Game Boy Color and Super Game Boy, these walls could be seen clearly as dots.
  • In Super Mario Land, there are many hidden sprites (and thusly exposed enemies/opportunities) exposed by using a multicolored palette. These and other "spoilers" can be avoided by using the monochromatic color palette as described below.

Cartridges

Game Boy Color games came in a clear plastic cartridge with a raised bump. Nintendo also made black cartridges that were compatible with the Game Boy Color, the older Super Game Boy and the original Game Boy. The black color distinguished these special cartridges from the grey Game Boy carts and the transparent Game Boy Color carts. The black cartridges had notches in the corner like old Game Boy cartridges, allowing an original Game Boy to be turned on when they were inserted, while the Game Boy Color cartridges did not. Special Game Boy Color palettes were built into the black carts, making it impossible to change their palette.

Color Palette

When playing an original Game Boy game on a later system, the user can choose which color palette is used. This is achieved by pressing certain button combinations while the Game Boy logo is displayed on the screen. It is also possible to use a monochromatic color scheme that preserves the original look of the game.

The palettes available for use when an original Game Boy game is played on a later Game Boy system are as follows:

  • Up dpad : Brown
  • Up dpad + A button : Red
  • Up dpad + B button : Dark Brown
  • Down dpad : Pastel Mix
  • Down dpad + A button : Orange
  • Down dpad + B button : Yellow
  • Left dpad : Blue
  • Left dpad + A button : Dark Blue
  • Left dpad + B button : Monochrome (Original Colors)
  • Right dpad : Green
  • Right dpad + A button : Dark Green (Default Palette)
  • Right dpad + B button : Inverted Monochrome

In addition, most Game Boy games published by Nintendo have a special palette that is enabled when no buttons are pressed. Any game that does not have a special palette will, by default, use the Dark Green (Right dpad + A button) palette instead.

Trivia

  • The Game Boy Color's screen is smaller than those of all other Game Boy systems, with the exception of the Micro.
  • The Game Boy Horror used in Luigi's Mansion is modeled after the transparent Game Boy Color.
  • The last Game Boy Color games released were Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (November 2002) in the United States; and Hamtaro: Ham-Hams Unite! (January 2003) in Europe.
  • The last Game Boy Color game released in the United States that was also compatible with the Game Boy and Super Game Boy was Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 (September 2001).
  • The last Game Boy Color game released in Japan that was also compatible with the Game Boy and Super Game Boy was From TV Animation - One Piece: Maboroshi no Grand Line Boukenhen! (June 2002). This gave the original Game Boy (1989-2002) one of the longest continuous lifespans of any console, only bested by the Atari 2600 (1977-1992) and the Neo-Geo (1990-2004).
  • The word Color in the title is spelled the same way in all territories; there is no Game Boy Colour.
  • The colors of the letters of the "COLOR" logo are the five standard colors of the Game Boy Color. There are various others as well, including translucent models and at least two Pokémon-themed models. One of these is yellow and blue and features various Pokémon and a Poké-Ball, the other shifts between Gold and Silver, and features a Pichu and Pikachu, the latter with its cheek as the power light.

Subcategories

This category has only the following subcategory.

N

Pages in category "Game Boy Color"

The following 66 pages are in this category, out of 66 total.

1

  • 102 Dalmatians: Puppies to the Rescue
  • 1942

A

C

D

G

G cont.

H

L

  • The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening
  • The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages
  • The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons
  • Lego Alpha Team
  • Lego Island 2: The Brickster's Revenge
  • Lego Racers

M

P

P cont.

Q

S

T

W


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Nintendo Game Boy Color article)

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Gameboy Color

The Game Boy Color is Nintendo's successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. It features a color screen and is slightly thicker and taller than the Game Boy Pocket, but smaller than the original Game Boy. The Game Boy Color could display up to 32 colors on screen at any one time and was much smaller than the original Game Boy, on par with the Game Boy Pocket.

Contents

Specifications

The processor, which is an 8080 workalike made by Sharp with a few extra (bit manipulation) instructions, has a clock speed of approx. 8 MHz, twice as fast as that of the original Game Boy. The Game Boy Color also has four times as much memory as the original.

The system was itself available in multiple colors. The logo for Game Boy Color spelled out the word COLOR in the five original colors in which the unit was manufactured. They were named:

  • Strawberry
  • Grape
  • Kiwi
  • Dandelion
  • Teal

Another color released at the same time was "Atomic Purple", made of a translucent purple plastic.

It had better battery life and used only two AA batteries (the original Game boy used four).

The keys are laid out so it's pretty easy to play with one hand for most people and adds an IR game link to the wired one (top left pointed to by ^COMM in the picture to the right).

Cartridges

Game Boy Color games came in a clear plastic cartridge with a raised bump. Nintendo also made black cartridges that were compatible with the Game Boy Color, the older Super Game Boy and the original Game Boy. The black color distinguished these special cartridges from the grey Game Boy carts and the transparent Game Boy Color carts. The black cartridges had notches in the corner like old Game Boy cartridges, allowing an original Game Boy to be turned on when they were inserted, while the Game Boy Color cartridges did not. Special Game Boy Color palettes were built into the black carts, making it impossible to change their palette.


There is a fair market in used Game Boy Color units and used games even now, but beware that games with batteries like many Pokemon games will forget the saved games (shows as "The save file is corrupted!") and the batteries are soldered in.

Color palette

When playing an original Game Boy game on a later system, the user can choose which color palette is used. This is achieved by pressing certain button combinations, namely either A or B (both achieving different results) and an arrow key, while the Game Boy logo is displayed on the screen. It is also possible to use a monochromatic color scheme that preserves the original look of the game by pressing B+Left.

In addition, most Game Boy games published by Nintendo have a special palette that is enabled when no buttons are pressed. Any game that does not have a special palette will default to the Dark Green (Right + A) palette instead. Two notable games that do have preset palettes are Metroid II and the Wario Land series. It is a reflective LCD display so it needs light to be seen (again like the original Game Boy), but does work in less light than the original.

History

The Game Boy Color was a response to pressure from game developers for a new and much more sophisticated system of playing, as they felt that the Game Boy, even in its latest incarnation, the Game Boy Pocket, was insufficient. The resultant product was backward compatible, a first for a handheld console system, and leveraged the large library of games and great installed base of the predecessor system. This became a major feature of the Game Boy line, since it allowed each new launch to begin with a significantly larger library than any of its competitors.

See also

Stub
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Simple English

File:Game Boy
The Game Boy color in Blue

The Game Boy Color is a video game console from the Nintendo company, introduced in October 1998. It is the successor to the original Game Boy and its Pocket spinoff.








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