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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Garrison (various spellings) (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, "to equip") is the collective term for a body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, of more than 50 men, but now often simply using it as a home base. The garrison. The station is usually a city, town, fort, castle or similar. For example, the 1st Battalion, 1st Infantry (U.S.) is garrisoned at West Point. Garrison town is a common expression for any town that has a military barracks.

British garrison

Garrison also specifically refers to any of the major military stations such as Aldershot, Catterick, Colchester, Tidworth, Warminster and London, which have more than one barracks or camp and their own military headquarters, usually commanded by a Colonel, Brigadier or Major-General, assisted by a Garrison Sergeant Major. In Ireland, Association Football (as distinct from Gaelic Football) has historically been termed the "garrison game" due to its connections with British military serving in Northern Ireland.[1]

Israeli garrison

In Israel, a garrison unit (Hebrew: חיל מצב‎; cheil matzav) is a regular unit defending a specified zone such as a city, a province, a castle or fortress, or even a single building.

References

  • Nouveau petit Larousse illustré, 1952 (French encyclopedic dictionary)

Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Garrison [1] is a town of 1,318 population in McLean County, in the central area of North Dakota.

Get in

By car

From Interstate 94 in Bismarck, take US 83 north about 70 miles, then west on ND 37/1804 approximately 3 miles.

From US 2 or 52 in Minot, take US 83 south about 40 miles, then west on ND 37/1804.

  • Souris Basin Transportation, phone 463-2600, offers departures to Minot every first Monday of the month, and departures to Bismarck every third Monday of the month. Call before 4PM Central Time the day before.
  • New Town Bus Lines, phone 852-2477, provides service between Minot and Bismarck every day except Wednesdays and Saturdays. The bus will not stop in Garrison without prior reservations.
  • Amtrak [2] serves Minot with its Empire Builder line.
  • The Dakota, Missouri Valley, and Western Railroad [3] provides freight rail service on a line between Max and Bismarck.
  • Garrison Municipal Airport, phone 337-9499. Operated by the city of Garrison for civil aviation.
  • Minot International Airport in Minot is served by Northwest Airlines [4].
  • Bismarck Municipal Airport in Bismarck is served by Northwest, United [5], and Allegiant Air [6].
  • Souris Basin Transportation, phone 463-7360, offers local dial-a-ride service. Call before 4PM Central Time the day before.
Garrison Dam
Garrison Dam
  • Fishing Hall of Fame, City Park, Garrison. Displays of fishing memorabilia and tributes to ND fishermen. Open Monday to Friday 1:00-6:00PM and weekends 11:00AM to 5:00PM. Tel: (701) 463-2843.
  • Camp Atchison State Historic Site, marks the location of the 1863 Sibley Expedition camp that was garrisoned by 1,000 soldiers.
  • Fort Stevenson State Park, on the north shore of Lake Sakakawea. Named for a late 1800s frontier fort that served as a supply depot for Dakota Territory’s military posts. It is a favorite spot for fishing walleye on the lake. Excellent facilities for boating will find excellent facilities within the park, including concessions, boat rentals, storage and slip rentals. Canoe and kayak rentals. 438 acres, modern and primitive camping, comfort station, campsite reservations, sewage dump station, playground, marina, boat ramp, fishing boat rentals, camp store, fish-cleaning station, swimming, restaurant, picnic shelter, hiking and Guardhouse Interpretive Center, camping cabins. Tel: (701) 337-5576. [7].
  • Fort Stevenson Guardhouse 3 miles south of Garrison on County Road 15, Garrison. An interpretive center depicts frontier military and American Indian history of the fort. Open year-round: 10:00AM to 5:00PM, except weekends between Memorial Day and Labor Day when it stays open until 9:00PM.
  • Garrison Dam and Power Plant 30 miles southwest along ND 200. 20-minute narrative tour on the operative and functions of the dam, power plant and outlet works along with electric distributions of power. Open Memorial to Day-Labor Day, tours hourly noon-4 p.m. Tel: (701) 654-7441. [8]
  • Heritage Park Museum 1 block west of Main Street on First Avenue Northwest, Garrison. Early railroad depot, two homestead houses, a log cabin, early schoolhouse, church and the original telephone office. Three picnic shelters and restroom facilities. Open Memorial Day to Labor day on Fridays 11:00AM to 4:00PM, and by appointment. Tel: (701) 463-2519.
  • McLean County Ag Show Garrison High School Gymnasium, Garrison. Agricultural tradeshow with exhibitors, demonstrations, speakers and concessions. Sponsored by Garrison FFA chapter. Tel: (701) 463-2818. Toll-Free: (800) 799-4242
  • North Dakota Governor’s Cup Walleye Fishing Derby is held annually at Fort Stevenson State Park.
  • Biking: annual CANDISC 420 mile bicycle tour in early August. Fort Stevenson State Park serves as the staging area for the event. Bike the Enchanted Highway [9] featuring large outdoor metal sculptures. Explore the Lewis and Clark trail. Tel: (701) 337-5576. Toll-Free: (800) 799-4242. [10]
  • Cross-country ski trails at Fort Stevenson State Park.
  • Snowmobiling at Fort Stevenson State Park.
  • Camping at Douglas Bay Recreation Area, 11 miles west, 8 miles south of Garrison. Primitive campsites with picnic table and grill, restroom vault, boat ramp, courtesy dock, drinking water. Tel: (701) 654-7411. [11]. Primitive camping also available at Steinke Bay, located 3 miles east, 2 miles south of Garrison. Tel: (701) 462-8541.
  • RV: Stoney Hill RV Park, Hwy 37 E, across from Garrison Golf Course and 4 miles from Lake Sakakawea. 22 RV full hook ups, sewer, water, electric, bathhouse, showers. Tel: (701) 337-2193. Toll-free: (800) 337-6509. Sportsmen's Centennial Park Campground, located 5 miles east, 3 miles south, 1 mile west of Garrison. Open May 1-October 31. Provides 105 RV sites, 18 electric, showers, toilets, swim, bait and tackle, concessions, fish-cleaning station, boat ramp, picnic shelters, multi-purpose room for meetings

Tel: (701) 337-5377 [12]

  • Garrison Municipal Golf Course, Tel: (701) 337-5420
  • Chase Pharmacy. Tel: (701) 463-2242
  • Fezziwig's Candy. Tel: (701) 463-2980
  • Flowers 'N Things. Tel: (701) 463-2003
  • Garrison General Store. Tel: (701) 463-2671
  • Sakakawea Gift Gallery. Tel: (701) 463-2697
  • S&J Hardware. Tel: (701) 463-2712
  • Super Valu Grocery. Tel: (701) 463-221
  • This That 'N More. Tel: (701) 463-2671
  • Four Seasons Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor . Tel(701) 463-2044
  • Garrison Bay Express . Tel(701) 463-2966
  • Hot Stuff Pizza . Tel(701) 463-2119
  • Lake Road Restaurant, Hwy. 37, Garrison. Tel(701) 463-2569
  • Stoney End Supper Club & Lounge, Hwy. 37, Garrison. Tel(701) 337-5590. [13]
  • Ye Olde Malt Shoppe, Main Street, Garrison . Tel(701) 463-2322. [14]
  • Goose Nest Lounge & Bottle Shop. Tel(701) 463-2782
  • Gordy's Bar & Bottle Shop. Tel(701) 463-2586
  • Stoney End Restaurant & Lounge. Tel(701) 337-5590
  • The Office Lounge. Tel(701) 463-2540
  • Totten Trail Lounge. Tel(701) 337-5513
  • Garrison Motel, Hwy 37 E, Garrison. Tel: (701) 463-2858. [15]
  • Lake Wood Motel, 401 4th St SE., Garrison. Tel: (701)463-8404
  • Robin's Nest Bed and Breakfast 101 E Central Ave., Garrison. 3 story Victorian home in the center of ND, Home cooked breakfast. Tel: (701) 463-2465
  • Indian Hills Resort & Campground, 7302 14th St. NW. Located 35 miles west of Garrison on Highway 1804. Two-bedroom units with kitchenettes, log camping cabins, RV and primitive camping. Families and groups of 8-10 people can also stay at the Arrowhead Lodge. 1.25-mile single track interpretive Lewis and Clark trail. Open May 15 thru October 25. Shower, sewer, bait, tackle, boat ramp, guide service, fish cleaning station, concessions, 50 RV sites with electrical hook-ups, and primitive camping. Tel: (701) 743-4122. [16] or [17]
  • Tammy's Prairie Pines Bed and Breakfast, 2888 27th ST NW, Max, ND. Farmhouse bed and breakfast, hunting lodging, special events. Tel: (701) 679-2112 or (701) 679-2227. [18]

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Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Garrison
by John Greenleaf Whittier
The earliest poem in this division was my youthful tribute to the great reformer when himself a young man he was first sounding his trumpet in Essex County. I close with the verses inscribed to him at the end of his earthly career, May 24, 1879. My poetical service in the cause of freedom is thus almost synchronous with his life of devotion to the same cause.

THE storm and peril overpast,
The hounding hatred shamed and still,
Go, soul of freedom! take at last
The place which thou alone canst fill.

Confirm the lesson taught of old--
Life saved for self is lost, while they
Who lose it in His service hold
The lease of God's eternal day.

Not for thyself, but for the slave
Thy words of thunder shook the world;
No selfish griefs or hatred gave
The strength wherewith thy bolts were hurled.

From lips that Sinai's trumpet blew
We heard a tender under song;
Thy very wrath from pity grew,
From love of man thy hate of wrong.

Now past and present are as one;
The life below is life above;
Thy mortal years have but begun
Thy immortality of love.

With somewhat of thy lofty faith
We lay thy outworn garment by,
Give death but what belongs to death,
And life the life that cannot die!

Not for a soul like thine the calm
Of selfish ease and joys of sense;
But duty, more than crown or palm,
Its own exceeding recompense.

Go up and on thy day well done,
Its morning promise well fulfilled,
Arise to triumphs yet unwon,
To holier tasks that God has willed.

Go, leave behind thee all that mars
The work below of man for man;
With the white legions of the stars
Do service such as angels can.

Wherever wrong shall right deny
Or suffering spirits urge their plea,
Be thine a voice to smite the lie,
A hand to set the captive free!


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

GARRISON, originally a term for stores or supplies, also a defence or protection, now confined in meaning to a body of troops stationed in a town or fortress for the purpose of defence. In form the word is derived from O. Fr. garison, modern , guerison, from guerir, to furnish with stores, to preserve, but in its later meaning it has been confused with the Fr. garnison, the regular word for troops stationed for purposes of defence. In English "garnison" was used till the 16th century, when "garrison" took its place. In the British army "garrison troops," especially "garrison artillery," are troops trained and employed for garrison work as distinct from field operations.


<< Garrison (Editor)

Garrote >>


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Gauntlet/Versions article)

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Contents

Amstrad CPC

Amstrad CPC

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1986.

Apple II

Apple II

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Mindscape Inc. in 1986.

Atari 8-bit

Atari 8-bit

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1985.

Atari ST

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Atari ST

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Mindscape Inc. in 1987.

Commodore 64

Commodore 64

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1986.

MS-DOS (CGA)

MS-DOS (CGA)

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Mindscape Inc. in 1988.

Mobile (J2ME)

Mobile (J2ME)

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by I-Play on September 8, 2004. Fairly faithful graphics but a small viewing area and no multiplayer.

Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and relesaed by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1986. One to two players only.

MSX

MSX

Developed by Atari and released by U.S. Gold in 1986.

Sega Master System

Sega Master System

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1990. The graphics have been adjusted to look better with the Master Systems' limited palette. Interestingly, it shows the number of credits the player has remaining (other versions hide this information in the pause screen).

Game Boy Advance

Game Boy Advance

Developed by EC Interactive and released by Destination Software, Inc. on November 3, 2005 as part of the Gauntlet/Rampart two-pack. This version has very accurate graphics and sound but, oddly, is only single player (despite the Game Boy Advance's multiplayer capabilities).

Xbox Live Arcade

Xbox Live Arcade

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Midway Games Inc. on November 22, 2005. This is no mere port; like other Xbox Live Arcade titles, this version includes upscaled graphics (approximately 64×64, compared to the original's comparatively small 16×16).

It also includes online co-op as well as Achievements (which earn the player Gamer Points), both of which are usual features of Xbox Live Arcade titles. Other than the graphics update, the levels and screen perspective are true to the original, and there are no additional levels or modes.

Noteworthy

NES

NES

Like the later Sega Genesis version, the NES version takes the "more than a port" route. It replaces the original level set with an entirely new array of even less linear levels, complete with world maps like those of Super Mario Bros. 3, allowing the player to plot their course through the game. There is also new music, and many new items. It also adds an actual storyline, which even explains why only two can play simultaneously.

Among the sacrifices made in the conversion are significantly reduced graphics, support for only two players, and no narration (character voices heard when hurt or eating remain).

See Gauntlet (NES) for the separate guide for this version.

PlayChoice-10

PlayChoice-10

The NES version later returned to the arcade as a game for Nintendo's PlayChoice-10 hardware. The only real changes (other than the time limit imposed by the PlayChoice-10 hardware itself) were a slightly larger visible play area and additional help tips at the top.

See Gauntlet (NES) for the separate guide for this version.

Sega Genesis

Sega Genesis

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Tengen in 1993 as part of Gauntlet IV. True to its name, Gauntlet IV was more than just a port; in addition to the original game recreated as faithfully as the technology allows it also includes Record Mode (where players can track more detailed high scores and save/restore their game), Battle Mode (where players can face off in a randomly-selected arena), and also Quest Mode, an all-new RPG that extends the Gauntlet mechanics to include money, EXP gain and more inventory items.

Tandy (TRS-80)

Gantelet (TRS-80)

Written by Dave Dies and published by Diecom Products in 1986. Gantelet is a clone for the Tandy line of color computers. It features only 15 levels, but lets three players play simultaneously and retains all the gameplay of the original. If you have the Sound/Speech cartridge the game has voices, saying similar things to the arcade original. It was followed by a sequel called Gantelet II, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Atari ST

Developed by Digital Dreams and published by Rainbow Arts in 1987. Garrison is a clone rather than a licensed version. It adds an additional character, the Dwarf, and makes some cosmetic changes (such as rock guitar music during the intro), but is largely faithful to the original. Followed by a sequel called Garrison II: The Legend Continues, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Commodore Amiga

Garrison (Commodore Amiga)

Developed by Digital Dreams and published by Rainbow Arts in 1987. Garrison is a clone rather than a licensed version. It adds an additional character, the Dwarf, and makes some cosmetic changes (such as rock guitar music during the intro), but is largely faithful to the original. Followed by a sequel called Garrison II: The Legend Continues, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Commodore 64

Garrison (Commodore 64)

Developed by Digital Dreams and published by Rainbow Arts in 1987. Garrison is a clone rather than a licensed version. It adds an additional character, the Dwarf, and makes some cosmetic changes (such as rock guitar music during the intro), but is largely faithful to the original. Followed by a sequel called Garrison II: The Legend Continues, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Atari 800

Dandy Dungeon (Atari 800)

While on the surface Dandy Dungeon appears to be a Gauntlet clone with some major omissions, the 1983 copyright says otherwise—it was originally released through the Atari Program Exchange (APX) and was written by then-MIT-student John Palevich. Ed Logg was inspired by it, and designed Gauntlet in its image. John wasn't all too pleased, but the matter was settled out of court.

Dandy Dungeon does not feature character differences, diminishing health, and various other improvements Ed made, but it did feature four-player support, a shared food inventory, and a level editor. A reprogrammed version called Dark Chambers was later released, this time licensed from John.


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


(1.) Heb. matstsab, a station; a place where one stands (1 Sam. 14:12); a military or fortified post (1 Sam. 13:23; 14:1, 4, 6, etc.).

(2.) Heb. netsib, a prefect, superintendent; hence a military post (1 Sam. 10:5; 13:3, 4; 2 Sam. 8:6). This word has also been explained to denote a pillar set up to mark the Philistine conquest, or an officer appointed to collect taxes; but the idea of a military post seems to be the correct one.

(3.) Heb. matstsebah, properly a monumental column; improperly rendered pl. "garrisons" in Ezek. 26:11; correctly in Revised Version "pillars," marg. "obelisks," probably an idolatrous image.

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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