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Garveyism is an aspect of Black Nationalism which takes its source from the works, words and deeds of UNIA-ACL founder Marcus Garvey.[1] The fundamental focus of Garveyism is the complete, total and never ending redemption of the continent of Africa by people of African ancestry, at home and abroad. It is rooted in one basic idea: "whatsoever things common to man that man has done, man can do". Therefore, Africa can become as glorious and profoundly advanced in the scientific and technological realm as any, when Africans will it to be.

The tenets of Garveyism are 1) race first 2) self-reliance and 3) nationhood. The ultimate goal of Garveyism is a United States of Africa which will protect the interests of Black people worldwide.

Garveyism and African Methodism were very similar in their own ways. The main goals of both movements were to empower African individuals through attaining a sense of self-worth, as well as the unification of the African diaspora worldwide. When Garveyism started to die down in America, it continued to be a major tool of maintaining African interest in black America. The movement started in ports, especially in Cape Town, and by the end of the year, a Garveyite newspaper, The Black Man started to surface. The newspaper written by Garvey, The Negro World surfaced on the Witwatersrand, and word of mouth helped spread Garveyism and also the notion that black fleets and armies were coming. To Africans, Garveyism brought a vision of liberation and an outlet for African's disillusion with existing authorities (Colonial officials, European missionaries, chiefs, etc.)

Garveyism can closely be related to the Rastafarian Movement.

References

  1. ^ "The "Back to Africa" Myth". UNIA-ACL website. 2005-07-14. http://www.unia-acl.org/archive/themyth.htm. Retrieved 2007-04-01.  
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