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Gary Patterson
Patterson at a press conference
Patterson at a press conference
Title Head Coach
Sport Football
Team record 12-0
Born February 13, 1960 (1960-02-13) (age 49)
Place of birth Larned, Kansas, U.S.
Career highlights
Overall 85-28
Bowls 5–3
Coaching stats
College Football DataWarehouse
Championships
2002 C-USA championship
2005 MWC championship
2009 MWC championship
Awards
2002 C-USA Coach of the Year
2005 MWC Coach of the Year[1]
2009 MWC Coach of the Year
2009 Walter Camp Coach of the Year
2009 George Munger Award
2009 The Woody Hayes Trophy
2009 Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year
2009 SN Coach of the Year
2009 AP Coach of the Year
2009 Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year
2009 Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year[2]
2009 AFCA Coach of the Year [3]
Playing career
1978-1979
1980-1981
Dodge City C.C.
Kansas State
Position Safety / Linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1982
1983-1984
1986
1987
1988
1989-1991
1992
1992-1994
1995
1996-1998
1998-2000
2000-present
Kansas State (GA)
Tennessee Tech (LB)
UC Davis (LB)
Cal Lutheran (DC)
Pittsburg State (LB)
Sonoma State (DC)
Oregon Lightning Bolts
Utah State (DB)
Navy (DB)
New Mexico (DC)
TCU (DC)
TCU

Gary Patterson (born February 13, 1960 in Larned, Kansas) is the head coach of the TCU Horned Frogs college football team. He played football at Dodge City Community College and Kansas State University.

Contents

Coaching career

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Early years

Patterson began his coaching career in 1982 at Kansas State, as an assistant to head coach Jim Dickey. After subsequently serving a number of years as an assistant coach at a number of different schools, Patterson was hired as Defensive Coordinator at the University of New Mexico in 1996. He served in that job for two years before leaving to take the same position at TCU in 1998. He was named head coach at TCU prior to the Mobile Alabama Bowl in December 2000, replacing Dennis Franchione who left to become the head coach at the University of Alabama.

Head coaching

In eight years at TCU, Patterson's 73 victories place him in second place on the TCU career victory chart, and he is the only coach in school history to record six 10-win seasons. His teams have only failed to reach a bowl game once (2004), the Frogs have earned a spot in the Final Top 25 five times. In 2005, Patterson led the Frogs to the Mountain West Conference championship in their first season of league play. Over the course of the 2005 & 2006 seasons, the Frogs won four consecutive games against Big 12 opponents, with only one of the four coming at home. Patterson was named the 2005 Mountain West Conference Coach of the Year[1].

Patterson turned down a job offer from Minnesota worth over $2 million per year to stay at TCU.[4]

In the 2009 college football season, Patterson led the Horned Frogs to a perfect 12-0 season record, a Mountain West Conference Championship, a #4 BCS season-ending ranking, and an invitation to the 2010 Fiesta Bowl. The 2009 Horned Frogs became the second "BCS Buster" from the Mountain West Conference (and the fourth, overall) and seriously threatened to "bust into" the 2010 BCS National Championship Game. The results of two games on December 5th likely denied the Horned Frogs a final #2 BCS ranking: a last-second, game-winning field goal by Texas in the Big 12 Championship Game and an epic fourth quarter rally needed by Cincinnati to win over Pitt.

Patterson was named the 2009 AP Coach of the Year, becoming the first head coach of a non-BCS conference team to win the award.[5] He won a total of seven national "Coach of the Year" awards in 2009[2] in addition to being named the Mountain West Conference Coach of the Year for the second time (his third conference "Coach of the Year" award, overall).

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl Coaches# AP°
TCU (WAC) (2000–2000)
2000** TCU 0–1 0–0 L Mobile Alabama Bowl 18 21
TCU (Conference USA) (2000–2004)
2001 TCU 6–6 4–3 L Galleryfurniture.com Bowl
2002 TCU 10–2 6–2 W Liberty Bowl 22 23
2003 TCU 11–2 7–1 L Fort Worth Bowl 24 25
2004 TCU 5–6 3–5
TCU (Mountain West) (2005–Present)
2005 TCU 11–1 8–0 1st W Houston Bowl 9 11
2006 TCU 11–2 6–2 2nd W Poinsettia Bowl 21 22
2007 TCU 8–5 4–4 5th W Texas Bowl
2008 TCU 11–2 7–1 2nd W Poinsettia Bowl 7 7
2009 TCU 12–1 8–0 1st L Fiesta Bowl 6 6
TCU: 85–28 53–18 ** replaced Dennis Franchione just before the bowl game
Total: 85-28
      National Championship         Conference Title         Conference Division Title
Indicates BCS bowl game. #Rankings from final Coaches Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

References

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Dennis Franchione
Texas Christian University Head Football Coach
2000–present
Succeeded by
Current
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
John L. Smith
Conference USA Coach of the Year
2002
Succeeded by
Jeff Bower
Preceded by
Urban Meyer
Mountain West Conference Coach of the Year
2005
Succeeded by
Bronco Mendenhall
Preceded by
Kyle Whittingham
Mountain West Conference Coach of the Year
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Nick Saban
Walter Camp Coach of the Year
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Nick Saban
AP Coach of the Year
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Mike Leach
The Woody Hayes Trophy
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Nick Saban
Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Nick Saban
SN Coach of the year
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Mike Leach
George Munger Award
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Mack Brown
Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Nick Saban
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent

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