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George Miller


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 7th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 1975
Preceded by Jerome R. Waldie

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 4, 2007
Preceded by Howard McKeon

In office
1991 – 1995
Preceded by Mo Udall
Succeeded by Don Young

Born May 17, 1945 (1945-05-17) (age 64)
Richmond, California
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Cynthia Caccavo Miller
Residence Martinez, California
Alma mater San Francisco State University, University of California, Davis School of Law (King Hall)
Occupation attorney
Religion Roman Catholic

George Miller III (born May 17, 1945) is an American politician who has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1975, representing California's 7th congressional district (map).

The son of liberal State Senator and Democratic Party leader George Miller, Jr., he was born in Richmond, California. He was educated at San Francisco State University and had just graduated from college when he ran unsuccessfully for his late father's State Senate seat in 1968. He then attended the University of California, Davis School of Law (King Hall), and after admission to the bar, served as legislative assistant to California Senate majority leader George Moscone before entering the House. Since 2007, Miller has served as chairman of the Education and Labor Committee, formerly known as the Education and the Workforce Committee.

Contents

Environmental issues

In the House, Miller has been a member of the Natural Resources Committee; he was that Committee's chairman from 1991 to 1994. Miller has supported efforts to preserve public lands such as the 1994 California Desert Protection Act, which among other things created Death Valley National Park and Joshua Tree National Park. In addition, Miller was the chief sponsor of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act of 1992, which mandated that the federal government's Bureau of Reclamation manage the Central Valley Project in order to better protect the fish and wildlife populations of California's Bay-Delta region.[1] Miller lost his chairmanship when Republicans won control of Congress in 1994. He stayed as the committee's Ranking Member until 2000, and remains on the committee. Miller is also a member of the Congressional Wildlife Refuge Caucus.

Education and labor issues

From 2001 to 2006, Miller was the ranking Democrat on the Education and the Workforce Committee. With that committee's chairman, and their Senate counterparts, Miller helped draft the No Child Left Behind education law in 2001 and 2002. Miller has focused on pension issues, reinstating Davis-Bacon Act wage protections for Gulf Coast workers in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. In addition, Miller has worked on education issues such as protesting student aid cuts,[2], increasing No Child Left Behind funding, and investigating the Bush administration's hiring of Armstrong Williams to promote that law. Miller has also been a vocal advocate of labor and immigration reform in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.[3]. In 2007, as chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, Miller sponsored the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007, which was enacted into law as an amendment to another bill. In 2001, Miller said, "The secret ballot is absolutely necessary in order to ensure that workers are not intimidated into voting for a union they might not otherwise choose."

Port Chicago disaster

Miller has petitioned to clear the names of the sailors of the World War II Port Chicago disaster in which more than 200 black men were court-martialed and 50 convicted of mutiny for refusing to continue to load ammunition onto warships after a tremendous explosion killed hundreds. For the most part, Miller's efforts failed, and fewer than four of the sailors convicted of mutiny are still alive. However, in 1999, during a flurry of pardons signed as he left office, President Bill Clinton pardoned Freddie Meeks, one of the 50 mutineers.[4] In addition, Miller wrote the legislation to designate the site of the event as a National Memorial.[5][6]

Indian gambling

Miller is a supporter of Indian gambling. In 2000, as ranking member of the House Resource Committee, Miller inserted an amendment to the Omnibus Indian Advancement Act that took an existing cardroom into federal trust for the Lytton Band of Pomo Indians. The amendment made the land acquisition retroactive to 1987, stating that "[s]uch land shall be deemed to have been held in trust and part of the reservation of the Rancheria prior to October 17, 1988."[7]. This allowed the Lyttons to open a casino at the cardroom under the terms of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. Some members of Congress and the gambling industry have called the amendment "underhanded," while other politicians have called the maneuver nothing out of the ordinary[8].

2008 presidential election

Miller, a superdelegate in the Democratic Party's 2008 presidential primary, pledged his support to Barack Obama despite the fact that his district voted for Hillary Clinton. Miller cited Obama's grassroots fundraising campaign, first-place win the Iowa caucus and strong showing in the New Hampshire primary, leadership style and opposition to the Iraq War as reasons for his endorsement. The endorsement was first reported in the Contra Costa Times on January 9, 2008.[9]

Committee assignments

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Party leadership

Electoral History

United States House of Representatives elections, 1974[10]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller 82,765 55.6%
Republican Mark C. Luce 66,115 44.4%
Totals 148,880 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1976[11]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 147,064 74.7%
Republican Robert L. Vickers 45,863 23.3%
American Independent Melvin E. Stanley 3,889 2.0%
Totals 196,816 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1978[12]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 109,676 63.5%
Republican Paula Gordon 58,332 33.7%
American Independent Melvin E. Stanley 4,857 2.8%
Totals 172,865 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1980[13]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 142,044 63.3%
Republican Giles St. Clair 70,479 31.4%
Libertarian Steve Snow 6,923 3.1%
American Independent Thomas J. "Tommy" Thompson 5,023 2.2%
Totals 224,469 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1982[14]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 126,952 67.2%
Republican Paul E. Vallely 56,960 30.2%
Libertarian Rich Newell 2,752 1.4%
American Independent Terry L. Wells 2,205 1.2%
Totals 188,509 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1984[15]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 158,306 66.7%
Republican Rosemary Thakar 78,985 33.3%
Totals 237,291 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1986[16]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 124,174 66.6%
Republican Rosemary Thakar 62,379 33.4%
Totals 186,553 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1988[17]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 170,006 68.4%
Republican Jean Last 78,478 31.6%
Totals 248,484 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1990[18]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 121,080 60.5%
Republican Roger A. Payton 79,031 39.5%
Totals 200,111 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1992[19]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 153,320 70.3%
Republican Dave Scholl 54,822 25.1%
Peace and Freedom David L. Franklin 9,840 4.6%
Totals 217,982 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1994[20]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 116,105 69.7%
Republican Charles V. Hughes 45,698 27.4%
Peace and Freedom William A. "Bill" Callison 4,798 2.9%
Totals 166,601 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1996[21]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 137,089 71.9%
Republican Norman H. Reece 42,542 22.3%
Reform William C. Thompson 6,866 3.6%
Natural Law Bob Liatunick 4,420 2.3%
Totals 190,917 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 1998[22]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 125,842 76.7%
Republican Norman H. Reece 38,290 23.3%
Totals 164,132 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2000[23]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 159,692 76.5%
Republican Christopher A. Hoffman 44,154 21.2%
Natural Law Martin Sproul 4,943 2.3%
Totals 208,789 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2002[24]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 97,849 70.8%
Republican Charles R. Hargrave 36,584 21.2%
Libertarian Scott A. Wilson 3,943 2.8%
Totals 138,376 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2004[25]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 166,831 76.1%
Republican Charles R. Hargrave 52,446 23.9%
Totals 219,277 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2006[26]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 118,000 84.0%
Libertarian Camden McConnell 22,486 16.0%
Totals 140,486 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold
United States House of Representatives elections, 2008[27]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic George Miller (incumbent) 170,962 72.9%
Republican Roger Allen Petersen 51,166 21.8%
Peace and Freedom Bill Callison 6,695 2.8%
Libertarian Camden McConnell 5,950 2.5%
Totals 234,773 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ Reclamation MP Region CVPIA homepage
  2. ^ Groups gird to battle Congress' proposed student aid cuts
  3. ^ Information from Congressman George Miller on the Northern Marianas Islands
  4. ^ Port Chicago Disaster - The Pardon
  5. ^ Congressman Miller's Port Chicago Page
  6. ^ Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial: World War II in the San Francisco Bay Area: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary
  7. ^ http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=106_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ568.106
  8. ^ https://san.secure.newtimes.com/issues/2001-06-06/news/feature_5.html
  9. ^ George Miller endorses Obama - ContraCostaTimes.com
  10. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 4, 1974," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  11. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 2, 1976," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  12. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 7, 1978," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  13. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 4, 1980," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  14. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 2, 1982," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  15. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 6, 1984," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  16. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 4, 1986," (retrieved on August 1st, 2009).
  17. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 8, 1988," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  18. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 6, 1990," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  19. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 3, 1992," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  20. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 8, 1994," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  21. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 5, 1996," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  22. ^ Office of the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives "STATISTICS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 3, 1998," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  23. ^ Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative in Congress," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  24. ^ Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative in Congress," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  25. ^ Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative in Congress," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  26. ^ Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative in Congress," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).
  27. ^ Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative in Congress," (retrieved on August 2nd, 2009).

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Ron Dellums
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 7th congressional district

1975–Present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Mo Udall
Arizona
Chairman of House Natural Resources Committee
1991–1995
Succeeded by
Don Young
Alaska
Preceded by
Howard McKeon
California
Chairman of House Education and Labor Committee
2007–Present
Succeeded by
Incumbent

George Miller
File:George Miller house


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 7th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 14, 1975
Preceded by Jerome R. Waldie

Born May 17, 1945 (1945-05-17) (age 64)
Richmond, California
Political party Democratic
Spouse Cynthia Caccavo Miller
Residence Martinez, California
Alma mater San Francisco State University, University of California, Davis
Occupation attorney
Religion Roman Catholic

George Miller III (born May 17, 1945) is an American politician who has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1975, representing California's 7th congressional district (map).

The son of State Senator George Miller, Jr., he was born in Richmond, California. He was educated at San Francisco State University and the University of California, Davis law school, after which he was admitted as an attorney and served as legislative assistant to California Senate majority leader George Moscone before entering the House. Since 2007, Miller has served as chairman of the Education and Labor Committee, formerly known as the Education and the Workforce Committee.

Contents

Environmental issues

In the House, Miller has been a member of the Natural Resources Committee; he was that Committee's chairman from 1991 to 1994. Miller has supported efforts to preserve public lands such as the 1994 California Desert Protection Act, which among other things created Death Valley National Park and Joshua Tree National Park. In addition, Miller was the chief sponsor of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act of 1992, which mandated that the federal government's Bureau of Reclamation manage the Central Valley Project in order to better protect the fish and wildlife populations of California's Bay-Delta region.[1] Miller lost his chairmanship when Republicans won control of Congress in 1994. He stayed as the committee's Ranking Member until 2000, and remains on the committee. Miller is also a member of the Congressional Wildlife Refuge Caucus.

Education and labor issues

From 2001 to 2006, Miller was the ranking Democrat on the Education and the Workforce Committee. With that committee's chairman, and their Senate counterparts, Miller helped draft the No Child Left Behind education law in 2001 and 2002. Miller has focused on pension issues, reinstating Davis-Bacon Act wage protections for Gulf Coast workers in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. In addition, Miller has worked on education issues such as protesting student aid cuts,[2], increasing No Child Left Behind funding, and investigating the Bush administration's hiring of Armstrong Williams to promote that law. Miller has also been a vocal advocate of labor and immigration reform in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.[3]. In 2007, as chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, Miller sponsored the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007, which was enacted into law as an amendment to another bill. In 2001, Miller said, "The secret ballot is absolutely necessary in order to ensure that workers are not intimidated into voting for a union they might not otherwise choose."

Port Chicago disaster

Miller has petitioned to clear the names of the sailors of the World War II Port Chicago disaster in which more than 200 black men were court-martialed and 50 convicted of mutiny for refusing to continue to load ammunition onto warships after a tremendous explosion killed hundreds. For the most part, Miller's efforts failed, and fewer than four of the sailors convicted of mutiny are still alive. However, in 1999, during a flurry of pardons signed as he left office, President Bill Clinton pardoned Freddie Meeks, one of the 50 "mutineers".[4] In addition, Miller wrote the legislation to designate the site of the event as a National Memorial.[5][6]

Darfur

Miller recently went on a bipartisan trip to the Sudanese region of Darfur. He advocates for U.N. intervention into the situation.[7]

Indian gambling

Miller is a supporter of Indian gambling. In 2000, as ranking member of the House Resource Committee, Miller inserted an amendment to the Omnibus Indian Advancement Act that took an existing cardroom into federal trust for the Lytton Band of Pomo Indians. The amendment made the land acquisition retroactive to 1987, stating that "[s]uch land shall be deemed to have been held in trust and part of the reservation of the Rancheria prior to October 17, 1988."[8]. This allowed the Lyttons to open a casino at the cardroom under the terms of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. Some members of Congress and the gambling industry have called the amendment "underhanded," while other politicians have called the maneuver nothing out of the ordinary[9].

2008 presidential election

Miller was a superdelegate in the Democratic Party's 2008 presidential primary. He pledged support for Barack Obama, despite the fact that his district voted for Hillary Clinton. Miller cited Obama's grassroots fundraising campaign, first-place win the Iowa caucus and strong showing in the New Hampshire primary, leadership style and opposition to the Iraq War as reasons for his endorsement. The endorsement was first reported in the Contra Costa Times on January 9, 2008.[10]

Committee assignments

Party leadership

References

External links

Template:Start box |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #cccccc" | United States House of Representatives |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Ron Dellums |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 7th congressional district

1975–Present |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Incumbent |- |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #ccccff;" | Political offices

|- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Mo Udall
Arizona
|width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Chairman of House Natural Resources Committee
1991–1995 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Don Young
Alaska
|- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Howard McKeon
California
|width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Chairman of House Education and Labor Committee
2007–Present |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Incumbent |- |}



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