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Gerard 't Hooft

November 2008
Born July 5, 1946 (1946-07-05) (age 63)
Den Helder, Netherlands
Nationality Dutch
Fields Theoretical physics
Institutions Utrecht University
Alma mater Utrecht University
Doctoral advisor Martinus J. G. Veltman
Doctoral students Robbert Dijkgraaf and Herman Verlinde
Known for Quantum Field Theory, Quantum Gravity
Notable awards Wolf Prize (1981)
Lorentz Medal (1986)
Spinozapremie (1995)
Nobel Prize in Physics (1999)

Gerardus (Gerard) 't Hooft (Dutch pronunciation: [ˌɣeːrɑrt ət ˈhoːft]) (born July 5, 1946, Den Helder, Netherlands) is a theoretical physicist at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. He shared the 1999 Nobel Prize in Physics with Martinus J. G. Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions". Asteroid 9491 Thooft is named in his honor; he has written a constitution for its future inhabitants. He was awarded the Lorentz Medal in 1986 and the Spinozapremie in 1995. Nobel Prize in Physics laureate Frits Zernike was his great-uncle.[1]

He is married to Albertha Schik (Betteke) and has two daughters, Saskia and Ellen. Saskia has translated one of her father's popular Dutch fiction books 'Planetenbiljart' into English. The book's title is 'Playing with Planets' and was launched in Singapore in November 2008.

Contents

Important work

See also

References

  1. ^ Robert Goldwyn. "Gerardus 't Hooft Science Video Interview". http://www.vega.org.uk/video/programme/35. 
  2. ^ Coleman, Sidney (1988). Aspects of Symmetry. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-31827-0. 

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Gerardus 't Hooft (born July 5, 1946) is a professor in theoretical physics at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. He shared the 1999 Nobel Prize in Physics with Martinus J. G. Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions".

Sourced

  • If you really want to contribute to our theoretical understanding of physical laws - and it is an exciting experience if you succeed! - there are many things you need to know. First of all, be serious about it!

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