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German Cross
Deutsches Kreuz
DeutschesKreuzinGold.jpgGermanCrossInSilver.jpg
German Cross in Gold (left) and Silver (right)
Awarded by Nazi Germany
Type Badge
Eligibility Military personnel
Campaign World War II
Status Obsolete
Statistics
Established 28 September 1941
Total awarded ~26,000 in Gold
~ 2,500 in Silver
German Cross in Silver and Gold.jpg
German Cross in Silver and Gold

The German Cross (German: Deutsches Kreuz) was instituted by Adolf Hitler on 16 November 1941 as an award ranking higher than the Iron Cross First Class but below the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross.

The German Cross was issued in two degrees: gold and silver (the color of the laurel wreath around the swastika), the former being an award for bravery, the latter being for distinguished service and was considered a continuation of the War Merit Cross with swords. The German Cross was unique in that the Gold and Silver degrees were considered as separate awards but should not be worn simultaneously. However, pictures of recipients wearing both grades exist. (see Odilo Globocnik). There are a total of 11 recorded instances of a recipient receiving both the German Cross in Silver and Gold during the war.

A special grade, the German Cross in Gold with Diamonds, was manufactured towards the end of World War II but was never bestowed.

This award was actually more a star than a cross (although one of the German names for the swastika was Hakenkreuz, "hooked cross"), and had a rather gaudy design, helping it gain its nicknames as "Hitler's Fried Egg", "patriotic rear reflector" and "Party emblem for the nearsighted". It had a diameter of 6.5 cm and was worn on the righthand pocket of the tunic. If a recipient was awarded both the silver and gold divisions, both of them could be worn on the uniform.

German Cross in Gold (cloth form)

This award was also available in cloth form, which made for easier wear on the combat uniform; Helmuth Weidling wore this variety during his defense of Berlin in April-May 1945. Far more awards in gold (combat) were made than in silver (support).

The cross title refers to the fact that the swastika is a cross, a sun-cross.

In 1957 an alternative version for replacement of the German Cross came out-it features a Iron Cross in place of the swastika

References

For Führer And Fatherland: Military Awards of the Third Reich by LTC John R. Angolia. 1976 R. James Bender Publishing. ISBN 0-912138-14-9

"The German Cross in Gold and Silver" by Dietrich Maerz, B&D Publishing LLC, Richmond, MI, 2009, ISBN 978-0-9797969-2-0


German Cross
Deutsches Kreuz
[[File:|140px]][[File:|140px]]
German Cross in Gold (left) and Silver (right)
Awarded by Nazi Germany
Type Badge
Eligibility Military personnel
Campaign World War II
Status Obsolete
Statistics
Established 28 September 1941
Total awarded ~26,000 in Gold
~ 2,500 in Silver
File:German Cross in Silver and
German Cross in Silver and Gold

The German Cross (German: Deutsches Kreuz) was instituted by Adolf Hitler on 16 November 1941 as an award ranking higher than the Iron Cross First Class but below the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross.

The German Cross was issued in two degrees: gold and silver (the color of the laurel wreath around the swastika), the former being an award for bravery, the latter being for distinguished service and was considered a continuation of the War Merit Cross with swords. The German Cross was unique in that the Gold and Silver degrees were considered as separate awards but should not be worn simultaneously. However, pictures of recipients wearing both grades exist. (see Odilo Globocnik). There are a total of 11 recorded instances of a recipient receiving both the German Cross in Silver and Gold during the war.

A special grade, the German Cross in Gold with Diamonds, was manufactured towards the end of World War II but was never bestowed.

The medal consists of a star badge, containing a swastika (in German, Hakenkreuz, "hooked cross", which gives the award its name, the "German cross"). It had a diameter of 6.5 cm and was worn on the righthand pocket of the tunic. If a recipient was awarded both the silver and gold divisions, both of them could be worn on the uniform.

[[File:|thumb|left|140px|German Cross in Gold (cloth form)]] This award was also available in cloth form, which made for easier wear on the combat uniform; Helmuth Weidling wore this variety during his defense of Berlin in April-May 1945. Far more awards in gold (combat) were made than in silver (support). [[File:|200px|right|thumb|Albert Speer receiving the German Cross in Silver from Adolf Hitler in May 1943.]] The cross title refers to the fact that the swastika is a cross, a sun-cross.

In 1957 an alternative version for replacement of the German Cross was implemented. It features a Iron Cross in place of the swastika, whose display was banned in Germany, and later in many other European countries, after the war. Veterans who had earned the medal during the Third Reich were unable to wear it on formal occasions, before this change.

References

For Führer And Fatherland: Military Awards of the Third Reich by LTC John R. Angolia. 1976 R. James Bender Publishing. ISBN 0-912138-14-9

"The German Cross in Gold and Silver" by Dietrich Maerz, B&D Publishing LLC, Richmond, MI, 2009, ISBN 978-0-9797969-2-0


Simple English

The German Cross (German: Deutsches Kreuz) was begun by Adolf Hitler on 16 November 1941 as an award that was a higher level than the Iron Cross First Class but below the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. It was given in two classes: gold and silver (the color of the laurel wreath around the swastika), the gold was given out for bravery, the silver was given out for excellent service.

[[File:|thumb|left|140px|German Cross in Gold (cloth form)]] This award was also available in cloth, which made for easier wear on the combat uniform.

The title of the award is taken from the fact that the swastika is a type of cross.

= References

= For Führer And Fatherland: Military Awards of the Third Reich by LTC John R. Angolia. 1976 R. James Bender Publishing. ISBN 0-912138-14-9









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