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"Getting Better"
Song by The Beatles

from the album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

Released 1 June 1967
Recorded 9 March 1967
Genre Pop,[1] rock,[1] jazz fusion[2]
Length 2:47
Label Parlophone, Capitol, EMI
Writer Lennon/McCartney
Producer George Martin
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band track listing

"Getting Better" is a song written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, based on an original idea by McCartney.[3 ] It was recorded by The Beatles for the 1967 album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Contents

Composition

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Music

The song, musically reminiscent of the hit single "Penny Lane",[4] moves forward by way of regular chords, produced by Lennon's guitar, McCartney's electric piano, and George Martin, who struck the strings of a pianette with a mallet. These heavily accented and repetitive lines cause the song to sound as if it is based on a drone. Lead guitarist George Harrison adds an Indian tambura part to the final verse, which further accentuates this impact.

Lyrics

The song's title and music suggest optimism but some of the song's lyrics have a more negative tone. In this sense, it reflects the contrasting personas of the two songwriters. In response to McCartney's line, "It's getting better all the time," Lennon replies, "It can't get no worse!"[5] Lennon also claimed the lyric that begins, "I used to be cruel to my woman..."[6]

According to Hunter Davies, the initial idea for the song's title came from a phrase often spoken by Jimmy Nicol, the group's stand-in drummer for the Australian leg of a 1964 tour.[3 ]

Lennon on the roof

One of the recording sessions for "Getting Better" is famous for an incident involving Lennon. During the 21 March 1967 session in which producer George Martin added a piano solo, Lennon complained that he did not feel well and could not focus.[7 ][8] He had accidentally taken LSD when he meant to take an upper.[9] Unaware of the mistake, Martin took him up to the roof of Abbey Road Studio for some fresh air, and returned to Studio Two where McCartney and Harrison were waiting. They knew why Lennon was not well, and upon hearing where Lennon was, rushed to the roof to retrieve him and prevent a possible accident.[8][10 ][11 ]

Personnel

Personnel per Ian MacDonald[4]

Cover versions

Notes

  1. ^ a b Unterberger 2009.
  2. ^ Pollack 1995.
  3. ^ a b Miles 1997, pp. 312–313.
  4. ^ a b MacDonald 2005, p. 241.
  5. ^ Miles 1997, p. 314.
  6. ^ Sheff 2000, p. 182.
  7. ^ Spitz 2005, pp. 670–671.
  8. ^ a b Lewisohn 1988, p. 104.
  9. ^ Miles 1997, p. 382.
  10. ^ The Beatles 2000, p. 242.
  11. ^ Emerick 2006, p. 172–173.

References


Simple English

"Getting Better"
Song by The Beatles

from the album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

Released 1 June 1967
Recorded 9 March 1967
Genre Pop,[1] rock,[1] jazz fusion[2]
Length 2:47
Label Parlophone, Capitol, EMI
Writer Lennon/McCartney
Producer George Martin
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band track listing

"Getting Better" is a song written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, based on an original idea by McCartney.[3] It was recorded by The Beatles for the 1967 album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Contents

Lennon on the roof

One of the recording sessions for "Getting Better" is famous for an incident involving Lennon. During the 21 March 1967 session in which producer George Martin added a piano solo, Lennon complained that he did not feel well and could not focus.[4][5] He had accidentally taken LSD when he meant to take an upper.[6] Unaware of the mistake, Martin took him up to the roof of Abbey Road Studio for some fresh air, and returned to Studio Two where McCartney and Harrison were waiting. They knew why Lennon was not well, and upon hearing where Lennon was, rushed to the roof to retrieve him and prevent a possible accident.[5][7][8]

Personnel

Personnel per Ian MacDonald[9]

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Unterberger 2009.
  2. Pollack 1995.
  3. Miles 1997, pp. 312–313.
  4. Spitz 2005, pp. 670–671.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Lewisohn 1988, p. 104.
  6. Miles 1997, p. 382.
  7. The Beatles 2000, p. 242.
  8. Emerick 2006, p. 172–173.
  9. MacDonald 2005, p. 241.

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