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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For current information on this topic, see Ghana national football team 2010.
Ghana
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) The Black Stars
Association Ghana Football Association
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Head coach Milovan Rajevac[1]
Captain Stephen Appiah
Most caps Richard Kingston (89)[2]
Top scorer Abedi Pele (33)
Home stadium Ohene Djan Sports Stadium
FIFA code GHA
FIFA ranking 27
Highest FIFA ranking 14 (February, April, May 2008)
Lowest FIFA ranking 89 (June 2004)
Elo ranking 42
Highest Elo ranking 14 (30 June 1966)
Lowest Elo ranking 97 (14 June 2004)
Home colours
Away colours
First international
Gold Coast (British colony) Gold Coast 1-0 Nigeria Flag of British Colonial Nigeria.svg
(Accra, Gold Coast; 21 May 1950)
Biggest win
 Kenya 0-13 Ghana 
(London, Great Britain; 12 December 1965)[3]
Biggest defeat
 Bulgaria 10-0 Ghana 
(Leon, Mexico; 2 October 1968)[citation needed][4][5][6]
World Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 2006)
Best result Round 2, 2006
African Nations Cup
Appearances 17 (First in 1963)
Best result Winners, 1963, 1965,
1978, 1982
Olympic medal record
Men's Football
Bronze 1992 Barcelona[7] Team

The Ghana national football team, popularly known as the Black Stars, is the national association football team of Ghana and is controlled by the Ghana Football Association. Before gaining independence from Great Britain in 1957, the country played as the Gold Coast.

Although the team did not qualify for the senior FIFA World Cup until 2006, they had qualified for five straight Olympic Games Football Tournaments when the tournament was still a full senior national team competition. The team have won the Africa Cup of Nations four times[8] (in 1963, 1965, 1978, and 1982), making Ghana the second most successful team in the contest's history, behind Egypt. The Olympic Team,[7] the Black Meteors, in 1992 became the first African country to win a medal at football.

After going through 2005 unbeaten, Ghana won the FIFA most improved team of the year award [1] and they reached the second round of the 2006 Germany World Cup.

Contents

History

The Ghana Amateur Football Association was founded in 1957, soon after the country's independence, and was affiliated to both CAF and FIFA the following year, Englishman George Ainsley being appointed coach of the national team.

In 1960 the Black Stars played Spanish giants Real Madrid, who were at the time Spanish, European and intercontinental champions, and drew 3-3.

Charles Kumi Gyamfi became coach in 1961, and Ghana won successive Africa Cup of Nations titles, in 1963 and 1965, and achieved their record win, 13-0 away to Kenya, shortly after the second of these. They also reached the final of the tournament in 1968 and 1970, losing 1-0 on each occasion, to DR Congo and Sudan respectively. Their domination of this tournament earned the country the nickname of "the Brazil of Africa" in the 1960s[9]. The team had no success in FIFA World Cup qualification during this era, and failed to qualify for three successive African Cup of Nations in the 1970s, but qualified for the Olympic Games Football Tournaments, reaching the quarter finals in 1964 and withdrawing on political grounds in 1976 and 1980.

Ghana again won the African Cup of Nations in 1978, retaining the Abdelaziz Abdallah Salem Trophy in perpetuity for having won it three times, and 1982, but a relatively barren period followed, with the full national team dominating the short lived West African Nations Cup from 1982–87, but making little progress in continent-wide competitions until the appointment of Burkhard Ziese as coach in 1991. The 1992 African Cup of Nations, after three failures to reach the final tournament, saw Ghana finish second, beaten on penalties in the final by Côte d'Ivoire.

Disharmony among the squad, which eventually lead to parliamentary and executive intervention to settle issues between two of the team, Abedi Pele and Anthony Yeboah, may have played some part in the failure of the team to build on the successes of the national underage teams. Ghana slipped to 89th place in the FIFA World Rankings, but a new generation of players who went to the 2001 FIFA World Youth Championship final became the core of the team at the 2002 African Cup of Nations and the 2004 Olympic Games[7], and were undefeated for a year in 2005 and reached the finals of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the first time the team had reached the global stage of the tournament. Ghana started with a 2-0 defeat to eventual champions Italy, but wins over the Czech Republic (2-0) and USA (2-1) saw them through to the second round, where they were beaten 3-0 by Brazil. They again qualified for the 2010 World Cup finals.

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Team honours

1963, 1965, 1978, 1982
1968, 1970, 1992, 2010
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987
1978, 2003

World Cup record

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1962 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
1966 Withdrew - - - - - - -
1970 to 1978 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
1982 Withdrew - - - - - - -
1986 to 2002 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Germany 2006 Round of 16 13 4 2 0 2 4 6
South Africa 2010 Qualified
Total 2/19 4 2 0 2 4 6
The Ghana national team at the 2008 African Cup of Nations before the quarter-final match against Nigeria.

African Nations Cup record

African Cup of Nations
Titles: 4
Appearances: 18
Year Position Year Position Year Position
Sudan 1957 Did not enter Ethiopia 1976 Did not qualify Tunisia 1994 Quarter-finals
Egypt 1959 Did not enter Ghana 1978 Champions South Africa 1996 Fourth Place
Ethiopia 1962 Did not qualify Nigeria 1980 Round 1 Burkina Faso 1998 Round 1
Ghana 1963 Champions Libya 1982 Champions GhanaNigeria 2000 Quarter-finals
Tunisia 1965 Champions Côte d'Ivoire 1984 Round 1 Mali 2002 Quarter-finals
Ethiopia 1968 Second Place Egypt 1986 Did not qualify Tunisia 2004 Did not qualify
Sudan 1970 Second Place Morocco 1988 Did not qualify Egypt 2006 Round 1
Cameroon 1972 Did not qualify Algeria 1990 Did not qualify Ghana 2008 Third Place
Egypt 1974 Did not qualify Senegal 1992 Second Place Angola 2010 Second Place

For Angola 2010, see 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification (CAF)

Ghana were the only African side to advance to Round 2 of 2006 FIFA World Cup (Côte d'Ivoire, Togo, Angola, and Tunisia were all eliminated in group play), and the sixth nation in a row from Africa to progress beyond the group stages of the World Cup. Ghana was the youngest team in the FIFA World Cup 2006 with an average age of 23 yrs and 352 days.

Because of Ghana's performances in the tournament, there has been praise for their continuous efforts to push forward and their fearless attitude. Greece Coach Otto Rehhagel told FIFA.com, the teams you used to regard as a little behind tactically, the Africans for example, have caught up. They're physically even better off than we are, as they have tremendous natural athleticism, and they've come on enormously in the areas which were non-existent before, discipline and tactics for example. Every team which faced Ghana or Cote d'Ivoire knew they'd been in a game. FIFA.com says Black stars ascend to glory. BBC says: Ghana going forward[10].

Of the 32 countries that participated in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Ghana was ranked 13th by FIFA.[2]

2006 FIFA World Cup Matches
Category Team A Result Team B Date Venue Scorers
Round of 16  Brazil 3-0 Ghana Ghana 27 June Signal Iduna Park, Dortmund Brazil: Ronaldo 5, Adriano 45+,
Ze Roberto 84 [3]
First Half; Second Half
Group E Ghana Ghana 2-1  United States 22 June Frankenstadion, Nuremberg Ghana Dramani 22, Appiah 47+; USA: Clint Dempsey 43)[4]
Pre-Match; 1st Half; 2nd half
Group E Ghana Ghana 2-0  Czech Republic 17 June RheinEnergieStadion, Cologne Ghana: Asamoah 2, Muntari 82) [5]
Group E  Italy 2-0 Ghana Ghana 12 June AWD-Arena, Hannover Italy: Pirlo, 40 Iaquinta 83)[6]

Players

Goals

Pos. Player FM WCQ CAN Overall
1 Manuel Agogo 10 4 0 14
2 Matthew Amoah 7 5 0 12
2 Asamoah Gyan 7 2 3 12
4 Prince Tagoe 8 3 0 11
5 Michael Essien 8 2 0 10
6 Sulley Muntari 6 2 0 8
6 Stephen Appiah 6 2 0 8
8 Kwadwo Asamoah 4 2 0 6
9 Andre Ayew 2 1 1 4
10 Dominic Adiyiah 2 1 0 3

Current squad

Coach: Serbia Milovan Rajevac

No. Pos. Player DoB (Age) Caps Goals Club
GK Richard Kingson June 13, 1978 (1978-06-13) (age 31) 75 1 England Wigan Athletic
GK Isaac Amoako April 4, 1982 (1982-04-04) (age 27) 17 0 Ghana Kotoko
GK Daniel Adjei November 10, 1989 (1989-11-10) (age 20) 2 0 Ghana Liberty Professionals
DF John Mensah November 29, 1982 (1982-11-29) (age 27) 62 0 England Sunderland
DF John Pantsil June 15, 1981 (1981-06-15) (age 28) 58 0 England Fulham
DF Eric Addo November 12, 1978 (1978-11-12) (age 31) 45 0 Netherlands Roda JC
DF Hans Sarpei September 28, 1976 (1976-09-28) (age 33) 28 0 Germany Bayer 04 Leverkusen
DF Harrison Afful July 24, 1986 (1986-07-24) (age 23) 19 0 Tunisia Espérance
DF Samuel Inkoom August 22, 1988 (1988-08-22) (age 21) 15 0 Switzerland FC Basel
DF Isaac Vorsah June 21, 1988 (1988-06-21) (age 21) 13 0 Germany TSG Hoffernheim
DF Lee Addy February 21, 1990 (1990-02-21) (age 20) 8 0 Ghana Bechem Chelsea
MF Stephen Appiah December 24, 1980 (1980-12-24) (age 29) 61 14 Italy Bologna
MF Michael Essien December 3, 1983 (1983-12-03) (age 26) 51 9 England Chelsea
MF Sulley Muntari August 27, 1984 (1984-08-27) (age 25) 52 15 Italy Internazionale
MF Laryea Kingston November 7, 1980 (1980-11-07) (age 29) 37 6 Scotland Hearts
MF Anthony Annan December 24, 1980 (1980-12-24) (age 29) 30 1 Norway Rosenborg
MF André Ayew December 17, 1989 (1989-12-17) (age 20) 19 1 France Arles-Avignon
MF Emmanuel Agyemang-Badu December 2, 1990 (1990-12-02) (age 19) 13 0 Italy Udinese
MF Kevin-Prince Boateng March 6, 1987 (1987-03-06) (age 23) 0 0 England Portsmouth
FW Matthew Amoah September 24, 1980 (1980-09-24) (age 29) 39 13 Netherlands NAC Breda
FW Asamoah Gyan November 22, 1985 (1985-11-22) (age 24) 38 19 France Rennes
FW Manuel Agogo July 1, 19 (19-07-01) (age 1990) 27 12 Cyprus Apollon Limassol
FW Prince Tagoe November 9, 1986 (1986-11-09) (age 23) 17 3 Germany TSG Hoffernheim
FW Joetex Asamoah Frimpong April 17, 1982 (1982-04-17) (age 27) 11 2 Switzerland FC Lucerne

Previous Nations Cup squads

  • Ghana Squad - 1963 African Cup of Nations
  • Ghana Squad - 1965 African Cup of Nations
  • Ghana Squad - 1968 African Cup of Nations
  • Ghana Squad - 1970 African Cup of Nations
  • Ghana Squad - 1978 African Cup of Nations

APOY and other award winning players

Ghana has had great players in their rich history from the early 1950s, through the 1960s ANC Championship sides to 1970 when CAF instituted a new African Footballer of the Year Best player Awards to the 1990s when Abédi Pelé and Tony Yeboah received FIFA World Player of the Year top ten nominations and the 2000s when Sammy Kuffour and Michael Essien received Ballon d'Or nominations. Abédi Pelé was listed in the 2004 "FIFA 100" greatest living footballers.

On 13 January 2007, the Confederation of African Football voted Abedi Pele, Michael Essien, Tony Yeboah, Ibrahim Abdul Razak and Samuel Kuffour as members of the CAF top 30 best African players of all-time. In addition, Abedi and Yeboah were voted as among of the best African players of the century in 1999 by IFFHS.

Technical staff

Head Coach Serbia Milovan Rajevac
Assistant Coach Ghana Akwasi Appiah
Fitness Coach Vacant
Goalkeeping Coach Ghana Edward Ansah
Psychologist Ghana Dr. Yao Mfodwo
Physiotherapist Ghana Charles Botchway
Team Doctor Ghana Dr Percy Annan
2nd Team Doctor Ghana Dr Allan Akaba
Welfare Officer Ghana Opoku Afriyie
Protocol Officer Ghana Alex Asante
Spokesman Ghana Randy Abbey
Kit Manager Ghana Sherif Bobo Musah

Head coaches

Date appointed Manager name
2008–Present Serbia Milovan Rajevac
2008 Ghana Sellas Tetteh (interim)
2006–2008 France Claude Le Roy
2004–2006 Serbia Ratomir Dujković
2004 Ghana Sam Arday (interim)
2004 Portugal Mariano Barreto
2003 Germany Ralf Zumdick
2003 Germany Burkhard Ziese
2002 Ghana Emmanuel Akwasi Afranie
2002 Serbia Milan Živadinović
2001–2002 Ghana Fred Osam-Duodu
2001 Ghana Cecil Jones Attuquayefio
2000 Ghana Fred Osam-Duodu
1999–2000 Italy Giuseppe Dossena
Date appointed Manager name
1997–1998 Netherlands Rinus Israël
1996–1997 Ghana Sam Arday
1996 Brazil Ismael Kurtz
1995 Romania Petre Gavrilla
1995 Denmark Jørgen E. Larsen
1994 Ghana E.J. Aggrey-Fynn
1993 Ghana Fred Osam-Duodu
1992–1993 Germany Otto Pfister
1990–1992 Germany Burkhard Ziese
1988–1989 Ghana Fred Osam-Duodu
1986–1987 Germany Rudi Gutendorf
1984 Ghana Herbert Addo
Date appointed Manager name
1984 Ghana Emmanuel Akwasi Afranie
1982 - 1983 Ghana C. K. Gyamfi^
1978 - 1981 Ghana Fred Osam-Duodu^
1977–1978 Brazil O. C. Sampaio
1974–1975 Germany Karl Weigang
1973–1974 Romania Nicolae Nicuşor Dumitru
1968–1970 Germany Karl Heinz Marotzke
1967 Brazil Carlos Alberto Parreira
1963 - 1965 Ghana C. K. Gyamfi^
1963 Hungary Josef Ember
1959–1962 Sweden Adreas Sjolberg
1958–1959 England George Ainsley

^Won African Cup of Nations during tenure

Competitive Statistics

FIFA World Cup Record
FIFA World Cup Record GP W D L GF GA GD
World Cup Finals 4 2 0 2 4 6 -2
World Cup Quals (H) 30 20 8 2 57 17 +40
World Cup Quals (A) 29 7 8 14 31 38 -7
World Cup Total 63 29 16 18 92 61 +31
African Cup of Nations Record
Nations Cup Record GP W D L GF GA GD
Nations Cup Finals 66 37 13 16 91 56 +35
Nations Cup Quals (H) 31 22 6 3 69 23 +46
Nations Cup Quals (A) 31 11 8 12 42 31 +11
Nations Cup Total 128 70 27 31 202 110 +92

Nations Cup Record by team

Ghana versus GP W D L GF GA GD
 Côte d'Ivoire 8 5 1 2 17 11 +6
 Tunisia 6 5 1 0 10 4 +6
 Congo DR 5 3 0 2 8 5 +3
 Nigeria 6 3 1 3 6 7 0
 Senegal 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2
 Congo 3 3 0 0 7 2 +5
 Guinea 4 3 1 0 5 2 +3
 Zambia 3 2 0 1 3 2 +1
 Algeria 3 1 1 1 3 4 -1
 South Africa 3 0 1 2 0 4 -4
 Egypt 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1
 Morocco 3 1 1 1 2 1 +1
 Sudan 2 1 0 1 3 1 +2
 Burkina Faso 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4
 Cameroon 3 0 2 1 1 2 -1
 Libya 2 0 2 0 3 3 0
 Togo 2 1 0 1 3 2 +1
 Ethiopia 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2
 Uganda 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2
 Malawi 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Mozambique 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2
 Namibia 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Zimbabwe 1 0 0 1 1 2 -1
Total 66 37 13 16 91 56 +35

West African Nations Cup [SCSA Zone III] Record

Year Venue Round Position GP W D L GF GA GD
1982  Benin Final Winner 5 3 2 0 14 8 +6
1983  Côte d'Ivoire Final Winner 4 3 1 0 7 2 +5
1984  Burkina Faso Final Winner 5 2 3 0 9 5 +4
1986  Ghana Final Winner 6 5 1 0 12 2 +10
1987  Liberia Final Winner 5 5 0 0 14 2 +12
Total 5/5 5 Finals 5 Championships 25 18 7 0 56 19 +37
  • The Tournament was not held in 1985.

Trivia

In the final of the 1992 African Cup of Nations on 26 January 1992, Ghana was defeated 11-10 by the Côte d'Ivoire in the highest-scoring penalty shoot-out in International football competition at the time- the 24-shot shoot-out, when Ghana played their record 7th African Cup of Nations final game. Ghana captain and influential play maker Abédi Pelé, who won the best player of that tournament was suspended for the final because of yellow card accumulation from the 2-1 semi-final win over Nigeria.

Kwesi Owusu, former Black Stars captain, was the first footballer to score a goal at the Munich Olympic Stadium during the 1972 Olympic Games. His photograph still stands erect at one of the Olympic Villages in Olympiapark, Munich, Germany.

See also

External links

Titles

Preceded by
1962 Ethiopia 
African Champions
1963 (First title)
1965 (Second title)
Succeeded by
1968 Congo DR 
Preceded by
1976 Morocco 
African Champions
1978 (Third title)
Succeeded by
1980 Nigeria 
Preceded by
1980 Nigeria 
African Champions
1982 (Fourth title)
Succeeded by
1984 Cameroon 
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
West African Champions
1982 (First title)
1983 (Second title)
1984 (Third title)
1986 (Fourth title)
1987 (Fifth title)
Succeeded by
Defunct

References

  1. ^ "Rajevac named new Ghana coach". Ghana FA. 2008-08-12. http://ghanafa.org/blackstars/200808/3105.asp. Retrieved 2008-08-12. 
  2. ^ "All-Stars clash kick off in Bari". Meridian Cup. UEFA. 1 February 2001. http://www.uefa.com/competitions/meridiancup/news/kind=1/newsid=1880.html. Retrieved 2007-04-06. 
  3. ^ "Kenya International Matches". Kenya International Matches. RSSSF. 1 February 2000. http://www.rsssf.com/tablesk/kenya-intres.html. Retrieved 2007-04-10. 
  4. ^ "BLACK METEORS HUMILIATED 8-2 BY BRAZIL". Ghanaian News Runner. newsrunner.com. 3 April 1996. Archived from the original on 2007-06-24. http://web.archive.org/web/20070624025639/http://www.newsrunner.com/archive/NW170496.HTM. Retrieved 2007-02-01. 
  5. ^ "1996 INTERCONTINENTAL MATCHES". Author: Neil Morrison. srcf.ucam.org. 1 February 2001. Archived from the original on 2008-06-02. http://web.archive.org/web/20080602042453/http://www.srcf.ucam.org/~nfm24/football/1996ic1.html. Retrieved 2001-02-01. 
  6. ^ "Team news". The Independent. 1996-03-30. http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/team-news-1344861.html. Retrieved 2009-12-07. 
  7. ^ a b c Since 1992, squads for Football at the Summer Olympics have been restricted to three players over the age of 23. The achievements of such teams are not usually included in the statistics of the international team.
  8. ^ "African Football: The early years". bbc.co.uk. 2004-01-16. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/africa/3396199.stm. Retrieved 2004-01-16. 
  9. ^ "African Football: ANC winners from 1957 to 2002". panapress.com. 2004-01-01. http://www.panapress.com/can2006/winners.htm. Retrieved 2004-01-01. 
  10. ^ "Ghana going forward". BBC Sports (BBC Sports). 27 June 2006. http://www.congosports.netfirms.com/csfootnat.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-01. 

Simple English

Ghana
Association Ghana Football Association
Confederation CAF
Coach Milovan Rajevac
Most caps Abedi Pele (73)
Top scorer Abedi Pele (33)
World Cup
Appearances 2
First Apps 2006
Best result Round 2 (2006)

Ghana national football team is the national football team of Ghana.


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