Ghosts of Mars: Wikis

  
  

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John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars
Directed by John Carpenter
Produced by Sandy King
Written by John Carpenter
Larry Sulkis
Starring Ice Cube
Natasha Henstridge
Jason Statham
Pam Grier
Clea DuVall
Joanna Cassidy
Music by John Carpenter
Distributed by Storm King
Screen Gems
Release date(s) 24 August 2001 (Theater)
4 December 2001 (DVD)
Running time 98 min (1:38)
Language English
Budget US$28,000,000
Gross revenue $14,010,832

John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars is a 2001 movie directed by John Carpenter.

Contents

Plot

Set in the second half of the 22nd century, in the year 2176, the film depicts Mars as a planet that has been 84% terraformed, allowing humans to walk on the surface without wearing pressure suits. The story concerns a police officer, Melanie Ballard (Natasha Henstridge), second in command of a small team sent to pick up and transport a prisoner named Desolation Williams (Ice Cube). Arriving at the remote mining town where Williams is being held, Ballard finds virtually all of the people missing. She learns that the miners had discovered an underground doorway created by an ancient Martian civilization. When the door was opened it released "ghosts", disembodied spirits who possessed the miners.

Violence ensues, as the possessed miners commit acts of death and destruction, as well as self-mutilation. Ballard must fight off the attacking miners, escape the town, and destroy the ghosts, if possible. Unfortunately, her intentions are complicated by the fact that killing a possessed human merely releases the Martian spirit to possess another human. The team eventually decides to blow up a nuclear reactor to kill the human hosts. Ballard's crew is eventually wiped out by the miners, leaving only her and Williams. Not wanting the authorities to blame the massacre on him, he handcuffs Ballard to her bed and escapes the train, leaving her to return home. While she recuperates at a hospital, the released spirits attack the city. The end scene has Williams returning to team up with Ballard to fight the possessed.

Production

Although Mars has a day/night cycle almost identical in length to Earth's, most of the movie is set at night. Mars is shown only once in the daytime, in a flashback when a scientist describes how she found and opened a "Pandora's Box", unleashing the alien spirits.

Much of the movie was filmed in a New Mexican gypsum mine. The pure white gypsum had to be dyed with thousands of gallons of biodegradable red food dye to recreate the Martian landscape.

Reception

The film was met with generally negative feedback, garnering a 19% freshness rating from Rottentomatoes. Rob Gonsalves of eFilmCritic.com suggested that the film was symbolic of 'Carpenter at rock bottom'. According to the press, factors contributing to the box office failure of the film included poor set designs, hammy acting and a poorly developed script.

Since its release, Ghosts Of Mars received a cult following notably in Europe for the action sequences, the characterisation of Henstridge and Cube's character and his music.[1]

Soundtrack

John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars (film soundtrack)
Soundtrack by John Carpenter
Released November 19, 2001 (2001-11-19)
Recorded Cherokee Studios, Hollywood
Genre Instrumental
Heavy metal
Length 40:59
Label Varese Sarabande
Producer Bruce Robb
Professional reviews
  • SoundtrackNet 2.5/5 stars [1]
  • Filmtracks 2.5/5 stars [2]

For the film's soundtrack, John Carpenter recorded a number of synthesizer pieces and assembled an all-star cast of guitarists (including thrash metal band Anthrax, virtuoso Steve Vai, avant-garde musician Buckethead and former Guns N' Roses/current Nine Inch Nails guitarist Robin Finck) to record an energetic and technically proficient heavy metal score. Reaction to the soundtrack was mixed; many critics praised the high standard of musicianship and the strong pairing of heavy metal riffs with the film's action sequences, but complained about the overlong guitar solos, the drastic differences between the cues used in the film and the full tracks and the absence of any of the film's ambient synth score from the soundtrack CD.

Tracklisting:[2]

  1. Ghosts of Mars (3:42) - Steve Vai, Bucket Baker & John Carpenter
  2. Love Seige [sic] (4:37) - Buckethead, Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax (Scott Ian, Paul Crook, Frank Bello & Charlie Benante)
  3. Fight Train (3:16) - Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  4. Visions of Earth (4:08) - Elliot Easton & John Carpenter
  5. Slashing Void (2:46) - Elliot Easton & John Carpenter
  6. Kick Ass (6:06) - Buckethead, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  7. Power Station (4:37) - Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  8. Can't Let You Go (2:18) - Stone (J.J. Garcia, Brian James & Brad Wilson), John Carpenter, Bruce Robb & Joe Robb
  9. Dismemberment Blues (2:53) - Elliot Easton, John Carpenter & Stone
  10. Fightin' Mad (2:41) - Buckethead & John Carpenter
  11. Pam Grier's Head (2:35) - Elliot Easton, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  12. Ghost Poppin' (3:20) - Steve Vai, Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax

Credits:[2]

  • Music by John Carpenter
  • Produced by Bruce Robb for Robb Brothers Productions
  • Executive Producer: Robert Townson
  • Mixed by Bruce and Dee Robb
  • Assistant Engineer and Editing: The Great Tiago Becker
  • Recorded and Mixed at Cherokee Studios, Hollywood
  • Pro Tools Sound Design: Joe Bishara
  • Mastered by Pat Sullivan-Fourstar

References

  1. ^ 00's Retrospect: 2001 the Year of the Bloody Disgusting
  2. ^ a b http://www.theofficialjohncarpenter.com/pages/themovies/gm/gmstrk.html

External links


John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars
File:John Carpenter's Ghosts of
Directed by John Carpenter
Produced by Sandy King
Written by John Carpenter
Larry Sulkis
Starring Ice Cube
Robert Carradine
Jason Statham
Natasha Henstridge
Pam Grier
Clea DuVall
Joanna Cassidy
Music by John Carpenter
Distributed by Screen Gems
Release date(s) August 24, 2001
Running time 98 min
Country United States
Language English
Budget $28,000,000
Gross revenue $14,010,832

John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars is a 2001 action film directed by John Carpenter.

Contents

Plot

Set in the second half of the 22nd century, the film depicts Mars as a planet that has been 84% terraformed, allowing humans to walk on the surface without wearing pressure suits. The story concerns a police officer, Melanie Ballard (Natasha Henstridge), second in command of a small team alongside Sergeant Jericho (Jason Statham) sent to pick up and transport a prisoner named Desolation Williams (Ice Cube). Arriving at the remote mining town where Williams is being held, Ballard finds virtually all of the people missing. She learns that the miners had discovered an underground doorway created by an ancient Martian civilization. When the door was opened it released "ghosts," disembodied spirits who possessed the miners.

Violence ensues, as the possessed miners commit acts of death and destruction, as well as self-mutilation. Ballard must fight off the attacking miners, escape the town, and destroy the ghosts, if possible. Unfortunately, her intentions are complicated by the fact that killing a possessed human merely releases the Martian spirit to possess another human. The team eventually decides to blow up a nuclear reactor to kill the human hosts. At one point in the film Sergeant Jericho shows a romantic interest in Ballard.

Ballard's crew along with survivors who manage to gather in the jail are eventually wiped out by the miners after many fierce battles and events (including Ballard almost being possessed but fighting the ghost off and seeing its memories and motives), leaving only her and Williams after Sergeant Jericho and the other remaining soldiers and the two operators of the train are killed upon returning from a brief retreat to finish the fight. Not wanting the authorities to blame the massacre on him, he handcuffs Ballard to her cot and escapes the train, leaving her to return home and deliver her report, which is taken highly sceptical by her superiors. While Ballard recuperates at a hospital, the released spirits attack the city. The end scene has Williams returning to team up with Ballard to fight the possessed.

Cast

Production

Although Mars has a day/night cycle almost identical in length to Earth's, most of the movie is set at night. Mars is shown only once in the daytime, in a flashback when a scientist describes how she found and opened a "Pandora's Box," unleashing the alien spirits.

Much of the movie was filmed in a New Mexican gypsum mine. The pure white gypsum had to be dyed with thousands of gallons of biodegradable red food dye to recreate the Martian landscape.

Reception

The film was met with negative feedback, garnering a 19% freshness rating from Rottentomatoes. Rob Gonsalves of eFilmCritic.com suggested that the film was symbolic of 'Carpenter at rock bottom.' According to press reviews factors contributing to the box office failure of the film included poor set designs, hammy acting and a poorly developed script.

Soundtrack

John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars (film soundtrack)
Soundtrack by John Carpenter
Released November 19, 2001 (2001-11-19)
Recorded Cherokee Studios, Hollywood
Genre Instrumental
Heavy metal
Length 40:59
Label Varese Sarabande
Producer Bruce Robb
Professional reviews
  • SoundtrackNet [1]
  • Filmtracks [2]

For the film's soundtrack, John Carpenter recorded a number of synthesizer pieces and assembled an all-star cast of guitarists (including thrash metal band Anthrax, virtuoso Steve Vai, avant-garde musician Buckethead and former Guns N' Roses/current Nine Inch Nails guitarist Robin Finck) to record an energetic and technically proficient heavy metal score. Reaction to the soundtrack was mixed; many critics praised the high standard of musicianship and the strong pairing of heavy metal riffs with the film's action sequences, but complained about the overlong guitar solos, the drastic differences between the cues used in the film and the full tracks and the absence of any of the film's ambient synth score from the soundtrack CD.

Tracklisting:[1]

  1. Ghosts of Mars (3:42) - Steve Vai, Bucket Baker & John Carpenter
  2. Love Seige [sic] (4:37) - Buckethead, Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax (Scott Ian, Paul Crook, Frank Bello & Charlie Benante)
  3. Fight Train (3:16) - Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  4. Visions of Earth (4:08) - Elliot Easton & John Carpenter
  5. Slashing Void (2:46) - Elliot Easton & John Carpenter
  6. Kick Ass (6:06) - Buckethead, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  7. Power Station (4:37) - Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  8. Can't Let You Go (2:18) - Stone (J.J. Garcia, Brian James & Brad Wilson), John Carpenter, Bruce Robb & Joe Robb
  9. Dismemberment Blues (2:53) - Elliot Easton, John Carpenter & Stone
  10. Fightin' Mad (2:41) - Buckethead & John Carpenter
  11. Pam Grier's Head (2:35) - Elliot Easton, John Carpenter & Anthrax
  12. Ghost Poppin' (3:20) - Steve Vai, Robin Finck, John Carpenter & Anthrax

Credits:[1]

  • Music by John Carpenter
  • Produced by Bruce Robb for Robb Brothers Productions
  • Executive Producer: Robert Townson
  • Mixed by Bruce and Dee Robb
  • Assistant Engineer and Editing: The Great Tiago Becker
  • Recorded and Mixed at Cherokee Studios, Hollywood
  • Pro Tools Sound Design: Joe Bishara
  • Mastered by Pat Sullivan-Fourstar

References

  1. ^ a b http://www.theofficialjohncarpenter.com/pages/themovies/gm/gmstrk.html

External links









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