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Gilbert Adair: Wikis

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Gilbert Adair (born 29 December 1944 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish author, film critic and journalist. He won the Scott Moncrieff Translation Prize for his book A Void, which is a translation of the French book La Disparition by Georges Perec. The original book contains no instances of the letter e; Adair translated it with the same limitation. His works are compared to those of Julian Barnes, A S Byatt and Patrick Gale.

Contents

Career

His early works of fiction included two unauthorized sequels to classic works of Victorian English literature: Alice through the Needle's Eye (following Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass) and Peter Pan and the Only Children (following Peter and Wendy).

From 1992 to 1996 he wrote the "Scrutiny" column for The Sunday Times.

He is currently writing a stage version of Love and Death on Long Island which is being developed by producers New Gods and Heroes.

Personal life

From 1968 to 1980 he lived in Paris, France. At present he lives in London, England.

Adaptations

The 1997 film Love and Death on Long Island by Richard Kwietniowski was based on his 1990 novel of the same name.

The film The Dreamers by Bernardo Bertolucci, with a script by Adair, was based on his book The Holy Innocents, which Adair revised and rereleased under the same title as the film.

Bibliography

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Fiction

Non-fiction

  • A Night at the Pictures (with Nick Roddick) (1985)
  • Myths & Memories (1986)
  • Hollywood's Vietnam (1981)
  • The Postmodernist Always Rings Twice (1992)
  • Wonder Tales: Six French Stories of Enchantment (editor with Marina Warner) (1995)
  • Flickers (1995)
  • Surfing the Zeitgeist (1997)
  • Movies (editor) (1999)
  • The Real Tadzio (2001) - a biography of the boy (Baron WŇāadysŇāaw Moes) who inspired Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.

Translations

External links


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