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Gilbert Vinter (born May 4, 1909, Lincoln; died October 10, 1969, Tintagel)[1] was an English conductor and composer, most celebrated for his compositions for brass bands.

As a youth, Vinter was a chorister at Lincoln Cathedral, and eventually became Head Chorister there. He later became a bassoonist. In 1930, he joined the BBC Military Band, where he did much of his early conducting. It was during that time that he also began to compose. During World War II, Vinter played in The Central Band of the RAF and later led several other RAF bands.[1] He was the first principal conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra, from 1952 to 1953.

In 1960, The Daily Herald newspaper and sponsors of brass band contests, commissioned Vinter to write his first major work for brass band, the result of which was Salute to Youth. Vinter wrote other works for brass band, including:

  • Challenging Brass
  • Variations on a Ninth
  • The Trumpets
  • Triumphant Rhapsody
  • John O'Gaunt
  • James Cook - Circumnavigator
  • Spectrum

Vinter did not attend the premiere of Spectrum due to ill health. His other works include three brass quartets:

  • Elegy and Rondo (written at the request of the GUS (Footwear) Band Quartet to play at the 1966 National Brass Quartet Championship)
  • Fancy's Knell (written for the 1967 Championship)
  • Alla Burlesca (written for the 1968 Championship).

References

  1. ^ a b Rehrig, William H.; Bierley, Paul E.; and Hoe, Robert (1991). The Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music. Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press. pp. 788–789. ISBN 0918048087. http://hornplayer.net/archive/a130.html.  

External links

Preceded by
(no predecessor)
Principal Conductor, BBC Concert Orchestra
1952–1953
Succeeded by
Charles Mackerras
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