Girdle: Wikis

  

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The Lady of Shalott, with a medieval girdle around her waist (John William Waterhouse, 1888). Girdles at this time were more belt-like than today.
This article is about the item of clothing. In anatomy it is usual to speak of the shoulder or pectoral girdle and of the pelvic girdle. In the Scots language, girdle refers to a cooking griddle. In zoology a girdle is part of a chiton.

The word girdle originally meant a belt. In modern English the term "girdle" is most commonly used for a form of women's foundation wear that replaced the corset in popularity.

Contents

History

Historically and in anthropology, the girdle can be a scanty belt-shaped textile for men and/or women, worn on its own, not holding a larger garment in place, and less revealing than the loin-cloth, as was used by Minoan pugilists.

Constructed of elasticized fabric and sometimes fastened with hook and eye closures, the modern girdle is designed to enhance a woman's figure. Most open-bottom girdles extend from the waist to the upper thighs. In the 1960s, these models fell from favor and were to a great extent replaced by the panty girdle. The panty girdle resembles a tight pair of athletic shorts. Both models of girdles usually include suspender clips to hold up stockings.

Girdles were considered essential garments by many women from approximately 1910 to the late 1960s. They created a rigid, controlled figure that was seen as eminently respectable and modest. They were also crucial to the couturier Christian Dior's 1947 New Look, which featured a voluminous skirt and a narrow, nipped-in waistline, also known as a wasp waist.

A woman's girdle (in pink).

Later in the 1960s, the girdle was generally supplanted by pantyhose. Pantyhose replaced girdles for many women who had used the girdle essentially as a means of holding up sheer nylon stockings. Those who want more control purchase "control top" pantyhose. Many women forgo wearing girdles, stockings, and pantyhose entirely.

Girdles and "body shapers" are still sold to women who want to shape their figure with a garment. Some of these garments incorporate a brassiere and thus become functionally equivalent to a corset. However, they do not incorporate boning and hence do not produce the constricted waistline characteristic of Victorian-era corsets.

Girdle in literature

In literature, girdles are often portrayed as magical, giving power and strength if worn by men, and protection if worn by women. Many scriptures in the Bible point to the use of a girdle as a means of protection. Ishtar, a Babylonian Goddess, wore a fertility girdle, which, when it was removed, rendered the Universe barren. Hercules wrestled with the Amazon queen for her girdle in his Greek myth. Aphrodite and Venus also wore girdles associated with lechery in later poetry.[1]

For men a girdle was often used to hold weapons. It also gave them freedom to move in a fight, unlike other types of clothing. both of these are thought to carry the connection of power to the man's girdle in literature. For example, Odysseus wears a girdle which allows him to swim for three days straight, and a girdle worn by Thor doubles his strength.[1]

Later on, for women, the girdle became a sign of virginity, and was often considered to have magical properties. Monsters and all types of evil are recorded as being subdued by girdles in literature, a famous one being the dragon slain by Saint George. Marriage ceremonies continued this tradition of girdles symbolizing virginity by having the husband take the wife's girdle, and prostitutes were forbidden to wear them by law in historic France. Often in literature, women are portrayed as safe from sexual or other attack when wearing a girdle, but suddenly vulnerable if it is missing or stolen.[1]

Non-clothing uses in literature include Tolkien's "Girdle of Melian", a magical, protective "wall" surrounding an elven kingdom, and the metaphorical "girdle of righteousness" mentioned in the Bible, representing righteousness as a protection as well as something to be worn constantly.

The twentieth century women's girdle attracts various references in literature, often in a disparaging way. For example, Marilyn French in her classic book, The Women's Room, is very critical not only of the girdle itself, but also of the virtual compulsion to wear one, a compulsion which existed until the late 1960s. In John Masters's Bhowani Junction, once the mixed-race Victoria Jones decides to opt for an Indian rather than British persona, she rejects her girdle as a "western garment".

Eroticism

Like its predecessor garment, the corset, the girdle attracts a degree of eroticism. Some men like to wear female girdles, and/or find women attractive in them. In addition, the Australian feminist writer, Beatrice Faust, in her book Women, Sex and Pornography refers to a "slight but sustained feeling of arousal" when wearing a "moderately tight" girdle. The subject is discussed in the Web site Zona: The Girdle Zone.

Sports

In American football, a girdle is a piece of clothing that is worn under the football pants to keep the hip, thigh, and tailbone pads in place, making the process of putting on the tight football pants easier. Older girdles resembled chaps, in that they covered only the front of the leg with pads, that snapped on. Modern girdles are essentially a tight pair of compression shorts with pockets for the pads. The girdle was also used in the Mesoamerican ballgame and is used in hockey (National Hockey League).

Vestment and iconography

As a liturgical vestment, the girdle, also known as a cincture, is a long, rope-like cord tied around the waist over the alb. In the Vajrayana iconography of the Hevajra Tantra, the 'girdle' (Tib.: ske rags), one of the 'Five Bone Ornaments' (aṣṭhiamudrā) symbolizes Amoghasiddhi and the 'accomplishing pristine awareness' (Kṛty-anuṣṭhāna-jñāna), one of the 'Five Wisdoms' (pañca-jñāna).[2] The iconography of the girdle (or bone apron and belt [3]) in Vajrayana iconography developed from one of the items of vestment adorning the Mahasiddha of the charnel grounds.

Beer (1999: p.318) describes the bone girdle as the 'netted bone apron and belt' as vesture of the Dakinis and Heruka of the Cham Dance and Gar Dance of Tibetan Buddhism sacred ritual dance performances:

The bone ornaments worn in these ritual dances are exquisitely carved - especially the netted bone apron and belt, which are commonly adorned with intricately carved images of dakinis.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Friedman, Albert B., and Richard H. Osberg. "Gawain's Girdle as Traditional Symbol." The Journal of American Folklore 90.357 (1977): 301-15.
  2. ^ Kongtrul, Jamgön (author); (English translators: Guarisco, Elio; McLeod, Ingrid) (2005). The Treasury of Knowledge (shes bya kun la khyab pa’i mdzod). Book Six, Part Four: Systems of Buddhist Tantra, The Indestructibe Way of Secret Mantra. Bolder, Colorado, USA: Snow Lion Publications. ISBN 1-55939-210-X (alk.paper) p.493
  3. ^ Beer, Robert (1999). The Encyclopedia of Tibetan Symbols and Motifs. Shambhala. ISBN 157062416X. Source: [1] (accessed: December 28, 2008) p.318
  4. ^ Beer, Robert (1999). The Encyclopedia of Tibetan Symbols and Motifs. Shambhala. ISBN 157062416X. Source: [2] (accessed: December 28, 2008) p.318

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Bible wiki

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From BibleWiki

  1. Heb. hagor, a girdle of any kind worn by soldiers (1Sam 18:4; 2 Sam 20:8; 1 Kg 2:5; 2Kg 3:21) or women (Isa 3:24).
  2. Heb. 'ezor, something "bound," worn by prophets (2Kg 1:8; Jer 13:1), soldiers (Isa 5:27; 2 Sam 20:8; Ezek 23:15), Kings (Job 12:18).
  3. Heb. mezah, a "band," a girdle worn by men alone (Ps 10919; Isa 22:21).
  4. Heb. 'abnet, the girdle of sacerdotal and state officers (Ex 28:4, 39, 40; 29:9; 39:29).
  5. Heb. hesheb, the "curious girdle" (Ex 28:8; R.V., "cunningly woven band") was attached to the ephod, and was made of the same material.

The common girdle was made of leather (2Kg 1:8; Mt 3:4); a finer sort of linen (Jer 13:1; Ezek 16:10; Dan 10:5). Girdles of sackcloth were worn in token of sorrow (Isa 3:24; 22:12). They were variously fastened to the wearer (Mk 1:6; Jer 13:1; Ezek 16:10).

The girdle was a symbol of strength and power (Job 12:18, 21; 30:11; Isa 22:21; 45:5). "Righteousness and faithfulness" are the girdle of the Messiah (Isa 11:5).

Girdles were used as purses or pockets (Mt 10:9. A. V., "purses;" R.V., marg., "girdles." Also Mk 6:8).

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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