Gladwin County, Michigan: Wikis

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Gladwin County, Michigan
Seal of Gladwin County, Michigan
Map of Michigan highlighting Gladwin County
Location in the state of Michigan
Map of the U.S. highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location in the U.S.
Seat Gladwin
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

516 sq mi (1,336 km²)

10 sq mi (26 km²), 1.86%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

26,023
52/sq mi (20/km²)
Founded 1831
Website www.gladwinco.com

Gladwin County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 26,023. The county seat is Gladwin[1]. The county is named for Henry Gladwin, British military commander at Detroit during Pontiac's War. The county was named in 1831 and organized in 1875.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 516 square miles (1,338 km²), of which, 507 square miles (1,313 km²) of it is land and 10 square miles (25 km²) of it (1.86%) is water.

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Highways

Interstates

  • I-75.svg I-75 passes thru the northeastern corner of Gladwin County.

Michigan State Trunklines

Gladwin County Intercounty Highways

  • Michigan F-97 Gladwin County.svg F-97 routes north into Roscommon County.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 26,023 people, 10,561 households, and 7,614 families residing in the county. The population density was 51 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 16,828 housing units at an average density of 33 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.65% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.56% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. 0.96% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 28.1% were of German, 11.5% American, 11.1% English, 9.4% Irish, 7.3% Polish and 6.4% French ancestry according to Census 2000. 96.3% spoke English, 1.7% German and 1.1% Spanish as their first language.

There were 10,561 households out of which 27.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.50% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.20% under the age of 18, 6.50% from 18 to 24, 24.20% from 25 to 44, 27.80% from 45 to 64, and 18.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 98.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,019, and the median income for a family was $37,090. Males had a median income of $33,871 versus $21,956 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,614. About 10.40% of families and 13.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.40% of those under age 18 and 7.30% of those age 65 or over.

Government

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Gladwin County elected officials

  • Prosecuting Attorney: Aaron Miller
  • Sheriff: Michael Shea
  • County Clerk: Laura Brandon
  • County Treasurer: Christy VanTiem
  • Register of Deeds: Bonnie K. House
  • Drain Commissioner: Sherry Augustine
  • Road Commissioners: Doyle Donn; Keith Edick; Larry Miller
  • 55th Circuit Court Judge: Hon. Thomas R. Evans / Hon. Roy G. Mienk
  • 80th District Court Judge: Hon. Joshua Farrell
  • 17th Probate District Judge: Hon. Thomas P. McLaughlin
  • Board of Commissioners: Terry Whittington Chairman, Bill Rhode, Terry Walters, Dennis Carl, Sharron Smith, Jan Posey, Josh Reid.

(information as of December 18, 2008)

History

Before there was Gladwin County

Gladwin County is a headwaters area. Most of the water that flows out of the county via the Tittabawasee river comes from Gladwin County, only a very small portion flows in from Clare or Roscommon counties. Native Americans crossed this area, and even spent summers here where the fishing was good and summer berries plentiful.

Research is underway to determine the importance of an ancient trail that was noted by the crew of the 1839 re-survey of Township 17 north Range 2 west, which later became Beaverton Township. The eastern terminus of the "Muskegon River Trail" was plotted at the confluence of the three branches of the Tobacco (Assa-mo-quoi-Sepe) River in the northwest corner of Section 12. It is possible that an early cross-country route from Saginaw Bay to Lake Michigan proceeded up the Saginaw, Tittabawasee and Tobacco Rivers to approximately the point west across Ross Lake from the Beaverton City Cemetery. At that point the canoes would be portaged along the trail to the Muskegon river, then floated down to Lake Michigan.

Many native artifacts have been found along that route that attest to seasonal occupation, but so far no signs have been found to indicate any permanent, year-around settlement.

Europeans Arrive

The earliest documented visitors to the area that later became Gladwin County were the surveyors who platted that land according to the provisions of the Northwest Ordinance. Most of the early work was completed during the 1830s. Unfortunately, parts of the first survey were actually done in a bar room in Saginaw. The surveyors had predicted it would be centuries before anyone would move to such a God-forsaken, mosquito-infested swamp.

The earliest census to mention residents in the area was in 1860.

Cities, villages, and townships

Villages

None

Townships

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  

External links

Coordinates: 43°59′N 84°23′W / 43.99°N 84.39°W / 43.99; -84.39


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
Gladwin County, Michigan
Seal of Gladwin County, Michigan
Map
File:Map of Michigan highlighting Gladwin County.png
Location in the state of Michigan
Map of the USA highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1837
Seat Gladwin
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 1.86%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

26023
Website: www.gladwinco.com

Gladwin County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 26,023 (2006 estimate: 27,008). The county seat is Gladwin6. The county is named for Henry Gladwin, British military commander at Detroit during Pontiac's War.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,338 km² (516 sq mi). 1,313 km² (507 sq mi) of it is land and 25 km² (10 sq mi) of it (1.86%) is water.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 26,023 people, 10,561 households, and 7,614 families residing in the county. The population density was 20/km² (51/sq mi). There were 16,828 housing units at an average density of 13/km² (33/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 97.65% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.56% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. 0.96% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 96.3% spoke English, 1.7% German and 1.1% Spanish as their first language.

There were 10,561 households out of which 27.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.50% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.20% under the age of 18, 6.50% from 18 to 24, 24.20% from 25 to 44, 27.80% from 45 to 64, and 18.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 98.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,019, and the median income for a family was $37,090. Males had a median income of $33,871 versus $21,956 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,614. About 10.40% of families and 13.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.40% of those under age 18 and 7.30% of those age 65 or over.

Government

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Gladwin County elected officials

  • Prosecuting Attorney: Mary Hess
  • Sheriff: Michael Shea
  • County Clerk: Laura E. Flach
  • County Treasurer: Christy VanTiem
  • Register of Deeds: Bonnie K. House
  • Drain Commissioner: Sherry Augustine
  • Road Commissioners: Robert Pettit; Doyle Donn; Keith Edick
  • 55th Circuit Court Judge: Hon. Thomas R. Evans / Hon. Roy G. Mienk
  • 80th District Court Judge: Hon. Gary J. Allen
  • 17th Probate District Judge: Hon. Thomas P. McLaughlin
  • Board of Commissioners: Terry Whittington Chairman, Bill Rhodes, Mike Hargrave, Dennis Carl, Tom Hoag, Jan Posey, Josh Reid.

(information as of February 2007)

Cities, villages, and townships

Cities

Villages

None

Townships

External links

Coordinates: 43°59′N 84°23′W / 43.99, -84.39

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Gladwin County, Michigan. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Gladwin County, MichiganRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Michigan  +
Short name Gladwin County  +

This article uses material from the "Gladwin County, Michigan" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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