Glenn Anderson: Wikis

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Anderson playing in the 2008 Legends Classic in Toronto.
Born October 2, 1960 (1960-10-02) (age 49),
Vancouver, BC, CAN
Height
Weight
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Right/left wing
Shoots Left
Pro clubs Edmonton Oilers (19801991)
Toronto Maple Leafs (19911994)
New York Rangers (1994)
St. Louis Blues (1995)
Edmonton Oilers (1996)
St. Louis Blues (1996)
Ntl. team  Canada
NHL Draft 69th overall, 1979
Edmonton Oilers
Career 1980 – 1997
Hall of Fame, 2008

Glenn Christopher "Andy" Anderson (born October 2, 1960) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey right winger in the National Hockey League (NHL) who played for the Edmonton Oilers, Toronto Maple Leafs, New York Rangers, and St. Louis Blues. Anderson was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame on November 10, 2008.

Contents

Playing career

Anderson played for the Burnaby Winter Club and then University of Denver in the NCAA for a year before joining the Canadian National Team in 1979–80, helping to represent Canada at the 1980 Winter Olympics. He also played with the Seattle Breakers in the WHL that season. The Oilers drafted him in the fourth round of the 1979 NHL Entry Draft, 69th overall. He joined the Oilers roster in the 1980–81 season.

Anderson played 10 full seasons with the Oilers, from the 1980–81 to 1990–91 season inclusive. He would later briefly return in 1995–96 to play with the Oilers. He won 5 cups with Edmonton in the years 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990.

He was traded (with Grant Fuhr) to the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1991, where he played two seasons and part of another. There, he reached the 1000th point plateau and played a key role in the Leafs' 1993 playoff run to the Conference Finals. The Leafs traded Anderson to the Rangers (for Mike Gartner) just in time for their 1994 Stanley Cup win.

Although Anderson played the 1994–95 with the St. Louis Blues and the 1995–96 season split with the Oilers and the Blues, he did not play much in the NHL after his time winning the 1994 Stanley Cup (his 6th Cup) with the Rangers, playing only another 68 regular season and 17 playoff games split over those two seasons (he also played part of 1994–95 with the European hockey teams Lukko Rauma of the FNL and with the Augsburg Panthers of the DEL in 1994–95 and 1995–96). He was also, briefly, a Vancouver Canuck, but never played with them as upon signing with them as a free agent in January 1996 after coming back from playing with the Augsburger Panther he had to clear waivers, and the Oilers claimed him. (At the time, it was assumed this was long-awaited revenge for the Canucks having claimed Colin Campbell from waivers off the Oilers in the early 1980s. Then-GM Glen Sather is reputed to have never forgotten that incident, as he felt that the Canucks had agreed to not claim Campbell.) Due to the Oilers grabbing him from waivers, Anderson was reluctant on his return stint in Edmonton, as the team was no longer the same team he had won Stanley Cups with. Sather had hoped that Anderson could guide the then young, rebuilding Oilers with his leadership and experience, while also hoping to see Anderson hit his expected career milestones of 500 goals and 600 assists as an Oiler (he would not hit 500 goals but did get the 600 assists milestone but not as an Oiler). In 17 games on his return to the Oilers, he still managed 10 points (4 goals, 6 assists) before being claimed on waivers by the St. Louis Blues from the Edmonton Oilers (Anderson requested Sather to let him go if near the trade deadline that the Oilers were not playoff bound), for another stint with the Blues (15 games, 2 goals, 2 assists, 4 points) where he finished off the remainder of the 1995–96 season. In the 1996 playoffs, Anderson played 11 games producing 5 points (1 goal, 4 assists) in his final post-season in the NHL.

Anderson was noted for his aggressive "to the net" playing style, typifying the NHL power forward in the early 1980s. As an NHL player, he scored 498 goals and 601 assists in 1129 regular season games, and added another 93 goals and 121 assists in 225 playoff games. Noted as a "clutch" player, he was able to score key goals when the team most needed them. He scored 5 playoff overtime goals, third only to Joe Sakic's 8 and Maurice Richard's 6. On top of that he had 17 playoff game winning goals, good for 5th in the all time history of the NHL.

On June 17, 2008, it was announced that Anderson would be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a player.[1] For the Rangers, it marked the second straight year that a member of their 1994 Stanley Cup winning team had been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, following Mark Messier in 2007.

His jersey number was retired on January 18, 2009 before the game between the Edmonton Oilers and the Phoenix Coyotes [2]. He had the largest alumni turnout since the Heritage Classic for his jersey retirement.

Transactions

  • January 25, 1996- Claimed on waivers by the Edmonton Oilers from the Vancouver Canucks.
  • March 12, 1996- Claimed on waivers by the St. Louis Blues from the Edmonton Oilers.

Awards and achievements

Glenn Anderson won 5 Stanley Cups with the Oilers and another with the Rangers. He represented Canada at the 1980 Olympic Games, as well as twice at the World Championships and twice at the Canada Cup.

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1977–78 Bellingham Blazers BCJHL 64 62 69 131 46
1977–78 New Westminster Bruins WCHL 1 0 1 1 2
1978–79 U. of Denver WCHA 41 26 29 55 58
1979–80 Seattle Breakers WHL 7 5 5 10 4 2 0 1 1 0
1980–81 Edmonton Oilers NHL 58 30 23 53 24 9 5 7 12 12
1981–82 Edmonton Oilers NHL 80 38 67 105 71 5 2 5 7 8
1982–83 Edmonton Oilers NHL 72 48 56 104 70 16 10 10 20 32
1983–84 Edmonton Oilers NHL 80 54 45 99 65 19 6 11 17 33
1984–85 Edmonton Oilers NHL 80 42 39 81 69 18 10 16 26 38
1985–86 Edmonton Oilers NHL 72 54 48 102 90 10 8 3 11 14
1986–87 Edmonton Oilers NHL 80 35 38 73 65 21 14 13 27 59
1987–88 Edmonton Oilers NHL 80 38 50 88 58 19 9 16 25 49
1988–89 Edmonton Oilers NHL 79 16 48 64 93 7 1 2 3 8
1989–90 Edmonton Oilers NHL 73 34 38 72 107 22 10 12 22 20
1990–91 Edmonton Oilers NHL 74 24 31 55 59 18 6 7 13 41
1991–92 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 72 24 33 57 100
1992–93 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 76 22 43 65 117 21 7 11 18 31
1993–94 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 73 17 18 35 50
1993–94 New York Rangers NHL 12 4 2 6 12 23 3 3 6 42
1994–95 St. Louis Blues NHL 36 12 14 26 37 6 1 1 2 49
1994–95 Lukko Rauma FNL 4 1 1 2 0
1994–95 Augsburger Panther DEL 5 6 2 8 10
1995–96 Augsburger Panther DEL 9 5 3 8 48
1995–96 Edmonton Oilers NHL 17 4 6 10 27
1995–96 St. Louis Blues NHL 15 2 2 4 6 11 1 4 5 6
1996–97 HC La Chaux-de-Fonds Swiss-A 23 14 15 29 103
1996–97 Bolzano HC Italy 2 0 1 1 0
NHL totals 1129 498 601 1099 1120 225 93 121 214 442

International career

    Regular Season
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM
1979–80 Canadian National Team Intl
1980 Canada Oly
1984 Canada C Cup
1987 Canada C Cup
1989 Canada WCh
1994–95 Canadian National Team Intl 26 11 8 19 40
1995–96 Canadian National Team Intl 11 4 4 8 39

References

See also

External links

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