The Full Wiki

More info on Glenn Ligon

Glenn Ligon: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Glenn Ligon
Born 1960 (1960)
Bronx, NewYork
Nationality American
Field Conceptual Art
Training Wesleyan University
Untitled (I'm Turning Into a Specter Before Your Very Eyes and I'm Going to Haunt You) 1992, Oil and gesso on canvas. The Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Glenn Ligon is an American conceptual artist whose work explores race, language, desire, and identity.[1] He engages in intertextuality with other works from the visual arts, literature, and history, as well as his own life.

Glen Ligon is represented by Regen Projects, Los Angeles[2] and in Paris by Yvon Lambert Gallery[3].

Contents

Life and works

Born in 1960 in the Bronx, he graduated with a B.A. from Wesleyan University and currently lives and works in New York City.[4] He works in multiple media, including painting, video, photography, and digital media such as Adobe Flash for his work Annotations. Ligon's work is greatly informed by his experiences as an African American and as a gay man living in the United States.

In 1989, he mounted his first solo show, "How It Feels to Be Colored Me," in Brooklyn.[5] This show established Ligon's reputation for creating large, text-based paintings in which a phrase chosen from literature or other sources is repeated over and over, eventually dissipating into murk.

In 1994, the art installation "To Disembark" was shown at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. The title alludes to the title of a book of poetry by Gwendolyn Brooks. "To Disembark" functions in both works to evoke the recognition that African Americans are still coping with the remnants of slavery and its ongoing manifestation in racism.[6] In one part of the installation, Ligon created a series of packing crates modeled on the one described by ex-slave Henry "Box" Brown in his "Narrative of Henry Box Brown who escaped from Slavery Enclosed in a Box 3 Feet Long and 2 Wide." Each create played a different sound, such as a heartbeat, a spiritual, or contemporary rap music. Around each box, the artist placed posters in which he characterized himself, in words and period images, as a runaway slave in the style of 19th century broadsheets circulated to advertise for the return of fugitive slaves.[7] In another part of the exhibition, Ligon stenciled four quotes from a Zora Neale Hurston essay, "how it feels to be colored me," directly on the walls: "I feel most colored when I am thrown against a sharp white background," "I remember the very day that I became colored," "I am not tragically colored," and "I do not always feel colored." Ligon found Hurston's writing illuminating because she explores the idea of race as a concept that is structured by context rather than essence.[8]

In "A Feast of Scraps" (1994-1998), he inserted pornographic and stereotypical photographs of black men, complete with invented captions ("mother knew," "I fell out" "It's a process") into albums of family snapshots including graduation photographs, vacation snapshots, pictures of baby showers, birthday celebrations, and baptisms, some of which include the artist's own family. Like almost all of Ligon's art, this project draws out the secret histories and submerged meanings of inherited texts and images.[9]

Another series of large paintings was based on children's interpretations of 1970s black-history coloring books. In 2005, Ligon won an Alphonse Fletcher Foundation Fellowship for his art work.

In 2009, President Barack Obama added Ligon's 1992 "Black Like Me No. 2" to the White House collection.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Meyer, Richard. "Glenn Ligon." Gay Histories and Cultures: An Encyclopedia, Volume 2. Edited by George E. Haggerty. New York: Garland Publishing, 2000.
  2. ^ Regen Projects
  3. ^ Yvon Lambert
  4. ^ http://www.broadartfoundation.org/collection/ligon.html
  5. ^ Meyer, Richard. "Glenn Ligon." Gay Histories and Cultures: An Encyclopedia, Volume 2. Edited by George E. Haggerty and Bonnie Zimmerman. New York: Garland Publishing, 2000.
  6. ^ Kimberly Connor . Imagining Grace: Liberating Theologies in the Slave Narrative Tradition. University of Illinois Press, 2000.
  7. ^ Kimberly Connor . Imagining Grace: Liberating Theologies in the Slave Narrative Tradition. University of Illinois Press, 2000.
  8. ^ Kimberly Connor . Imagining Grace: Liberating Theologies in the Slave Narrative Tradition. University of Illinois Press, 2000.
  9. ^ Meyer, Richard. "Glenn Ligon." Gay Histories and Cultures: An Encyclopedia, Volume 2. Edited by George E. Haggerty and Bonnie Zimmerman. New York: Garland Publishing, 2000.
  10. ^ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/10/07/obamas-modern-art-photos_n_311958.html

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message