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The Global Gender Gap Report was first published in 2005 by the World Economic Forum. The 2008 report covers 130 major and emerging economies.[1]

The Report’s Gender Gap Index ranks economies according to their gender gaps and their scores can be interpreted as the percentage of the gap between women and men that has been closed. Information about gender imbalances to the advantage of women is explicitly prevented from affecting the score[2]. The three highest ranking countries have closed a little over 80% of their gender gaps, while the lowest ranking country has closed only a little over 45% of its gender gap. It “assesses countries on how well they are dividing their resources and opportunities among their male and female populations, regardless of the overall levels of these resources and opportunities,” the Report[3] says. “By providing a comprehensible framework for assessing and comparing global gender gaps and by revealing those countries that are role models in dividing these resources equitably between women and men, the Report serves as a catalyst for greater awareness as well as greater exchange between policymakers.” [4]

The Report examines four critical areas of inequality between men and women in 130 economies around the globe, over 92% of the world’s population:

  • 1. Economic participation and opportunity – outcomes on salaries, participation levels and access to high-skilled employment
  • 2. Educational attainment – outcomes on access to basic and higher level education
  • 3. Political empowerment – outcomes on representation in decision-making structures
  • 4. Health and survival – outcomes on life expectancy and sex ratio

Thirteen out of the 14 variables used to create the Index are from publicly available “hard data” indicators from international organizations, such as the International Labour Organization, the United Nations Development Programme and the World Health Organization. [5]

Contents

2008 Rankings

Top 20 Countries (numbers are rounded):[6]

  1.  Norway 82%
  2.  Finland 82%
  3.  Sweden 81%
  4.  Iceland 80%
  5.  New Zealand 79%
  6.  Philippines 76%
  7.  Denmark 75%
  8.  Ireland 75%
  9.  Netherlands 74%
  10.  Latvia 74%
  1.  Germany 74%
  2.  Sri Lanka 74%
  3.  United Kingdom 74%
  4.  Switzerland 74%
  5.  France 73%
  6.  Lesotho 73%
  7.  Spain 73%
  8.  Mozambique73%
  9.  Trinidad and Tobago 72%
  10.  Moldova 72%

2009 Rankings

Top 20 Countries (scores):[7]

  1.  Iceland 0.8276 ↑
  2.  Finland 0.8252
  3.  Norway 0.8227 ↓
  4.  Sweden 0.8139 ↑
  5.  New Zealand 0.7880
  6.  South Africa 0.7709 ↑
  7.  Denmark 0.7628
  8.  Ireland 0.7597
  9.  Philippines 0.7579 ↑
  10.  Lesotho 0.7495 ↑
  1.  Netherlands 0.7490 ↓
  2.  Germany 0.7449 ↓
  3.  Switzerland 0.7426 ↑
  4.  Latvia 0.7416 ↓
  5.  United Kingdom 0.7402 ↓
  6.  Sri Lanka 0.7402 ↓
  7.  Spain 0.7345
  8.  France 0.7331 ↓
  9.  Trinidad and Tobago 0.7298
  10.  Australia 0.7282 ↑

References

  1. ^ Ricardo Hausmann, Harvard University, Laura D. Tyson, University of California, Berkeley, Saadia Zahidi, World Economic Forum, Editors (2008). "The Global Gender Gap Report 2008". World Economic Forum, Geneva, Switzerland. http://www.weforum.org/pdf/gendergap/report2008.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-19. 
  2. ^ Ricardo Hausmann, Harvard University, Laura D. Tyson, University of California, Berkeley, Saadia Zahidi, World Economic Forum, Editors (2009). "The Global Gender Gap Report 2009". World Economic Forum, Geneva, Switzerland. p. 4. http://www.weforum.org/pdf/gendergap/report2009.pdf. Retrieved 2009-11-02. "(...) the Index rewards countries that reach the point where outcomes for women equal those for men, but it neither rewards nor penalizes cases in which women are outperforming men in particular variables" 
  3. ^ 2008 Report, p. 24
  4. ^ 2008 Report, p. 24
  5. ^ 2008 Report, p. 5
  6. ^ World Economic Forum. "Rankings: Global Gender Gap Report 2008". http://www.weforum.org/pdf/gendergap/rankings2008.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-19. 
  7. ^ World Economic Forum. "Rankings: Global Gender Gap Report 2009". http://www.weforum.org/pdf/gendergap/report2009.pdf. 

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