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Glory, Glory is the rally song for the Georgia Bulldogs, the athletics teams for the University of Georgia. Glory, Glory is sung to the tune of Battle Hymn of the Republic and was sung at football games as early as the 1890s. The fight song was arranged after the Union marching song in its current form by Hugh Hodgson in 1915.

Although generally thought to be the school's fight song, the official fight song is Hail to Georgia.

Contents

Lyrics

Glory, glory to ole Georgia!

Glory, glory to ole Georgia!

Glory, glory to ole Georgia!

G-E-O-R-G-I-A.

Glory, glory to ole Georgia!

Glory, glory to ole Georgia!

Glory, glory to ole Georgia!

G-E-O-R-G-I-A.

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Alternate lyrics

Georgia fans often replace the "G-E-O-R-G-I-A" phrase with a disparaging comment about a rival or a particular school that the Bulldogs happen to be playing at the time. During the 2008 South Carolina game, they could be heard singing, "To Hell with USC." One of the most popular alternate lines is "And to hell (or heck) with Georgia Tech!"[1]

Georgia Tech students often replace the lyrics with the phrase "To hell, to hell, to hell with Georgia!" when the song is played during a game or event.[2][3][4]

Auburn University and Auburn High School play Glory, Glory to Ole Auburn after extra points. Their version is exactly the same as that of Georgia, except the name "Auburn" is both said and spelled in both schools' version, and the "A" in Auburn takes place of "G" and "E" in Georgia. In other words, Auburn's version has the same meter as the refrain to the Battle Hymn of the Republic, whereas Georgia's version adds an extra syllable for the "E".

Auburn's version is in a different key, and played slower than Georgia's version.

References

Sources


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