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The Gordon Bell Prizes are a set of awards awarded by the Association for Computing Machinery in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers each year at The Supercomputing Conference to recognize outstanding achievement in high-performance computing applications. The main purpose of the award is to acknowledge, reward, and thereby assess the progress of parallel computing. The awards were established in 1987.

The Prizes were preceded by a similar much smaller prize (nominal: $100) by Alan Karp, a numerical analyst (then of IBM; won by Gustafson and Montry) challenging claims of MIMD performance improvements proposed in the Letters to the Editor section of the Communications of the ACM who went on to be one of the first Bell Prize judges. Cash prizes accompany these recognitions and are funded by the award founder, Gordon Bell, a pioneer in high-performance and parallel computing.

Contents

Prize categories

Depending on the entries received in a given year, prizes can be awarded in following categories:

Peak Performance: Awarded to the entry demonstrating the highest performance achieved in terms of operations per second on a genuine application program.

Price/Performance: Awarded to the entry demonstrating the best price-performance ratio as measured in megaflop/s per dollar on a genuine application.

Special: Awarded to the entry whose performance is short of that of the Peak Performance prize, which nevertheless utilizes innovative techniques to produce new levels of performance on a real application. Such techniques may be, for instance, in mathematical algorithms, data structures, or implementations.

List of recipients

The Gordon Bell Prize winners are:

Notable recipients include:

year peak performance
1987 450 Mflops
1988 1 Gflops
1989 6 Gflops
1990 14 Gflops
1996 111 Gflops
1999 1.2 Tflops
2001 11.4 Tflops
2005 107 Tflops
2006 207 Tflops
2008 1.352 Pflops
2009 2.33 Pflops

See also

References

External links

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The Gordon Bell Prizes are a set of awards awarded by the Association for Computing Machinery in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers each year at the Supercomputing Conference to recognize outstanding achievement in high-performance computing applications. The main purpose of the award is to acknowledge, reward, and thereby assess the progress of parallel computing. The awards were established in 1987.

The Prizes were preceded by a similar much smaller prize (nominal: $100) by Alan Karp, a numerical analyst (then of IBM; won by Gustafson and Montry) challenging claims of MIMD performance improvements proposed in the Letters to the Editor section of the Communications of the ACM who went on to be one of the first Bell Prize judges. Cash prizes accompany these recognitions and are funded by the award founder, Gordon Bell, a pioneer in high-performance and parallel computing.

Contents

Prize categories

Depending on the entries received in a given year, prizes can be awarded in following categories:

Peak Performance: Awarded to the entry demonstrating the highest performance achieved in terms of operations per second on a genuine application program.

Price/Performance: Awarded to the entry demonstrating the best price-performance ratio as measured in megaflop/s per dollar on a genuine application.

Special: Awarded to the entry whose performance is short of that of the Peak Performance prize, which nevertheless utilizes innovative techniques to produce new levels of performance on a real application. Such techniques may be, for instance, in mathematical algorithms, data structures, or implementations.

List of recipients

The Gordon Bell Prize winners are:

Notable recipients include:

year peak performance
1987 450 Mflops
1988 1 Gflops
1989 6 Gflops
1990 14 Gflops
1996 111 Gflops
1999 1.2 Tflops
2001 11.4 Tflops
2005 107 Tflops
2006 207 Tflops
2008 1.352 Pflops
2009 2.33 Pflops

See also

File:Internet map 1024.jpg Computer Science portal

References

External links


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