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Gouache paints come in many colors and are usually mixed with water to achieve the desired working properties and to control the opacity when dry.

Gouache[p](English pronunciation: /ɡuːˈæʃ/; French: [ˈɡwaʃ]), the name of which derives from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash or bodycolor (the term preferred by art historians) is a type of paint consisting of pigment suspended in water. Gouache differs from watercolor in that the particles are larger, the ratio of pigment to water is much higher, and an additional, inert, white pigment such as chalk is also present. Like all watermedia, it is diluted with water. (Gum Arabic is also present as a binding agent, just as in watercolor.) This makes gouache heavier and more opaque, with greater reflective qualities.[1]

Contents

History

A premiere, Anders Zorn
Self-portrait, Friedrich Schwinge.

"Guazzo" was originally a term applied to the early 16th century practice of applying oil paint over a tempera base.[2] The term was applied to the watermedia in the 18th century in France, although the technique is considerably older. It was used as early as the 14th century in Europe.

Application

Gouache generally dries to a different value than it appears when wet (lighter tones generally dry darker, while darker tones tend to dry lighter), which can make it difficult to match colors over multiple painting sessions. This, combined with its quick coverage and total hiding power, mean that gouache lends itself to more immediate techniques than watercolor.[3] "En plein air" paintings take advantage of this, as do works of J.M.W. Turner and Victor Lensner. It is used most consistently by commercial artists for works such as posters, illustrations, comics, and for other design work. For example, comics illustrators like Alex Ross use mostly gouache for their work. Industrial Designer and Visual Futurist Syd Mead also works primarily in gouache. Most 20th-century animations used it to create an opaque color on a cel with watercolor paint used for backgrounds, and gouache as "poster paint" is desirable for its speed and durability.

As with all types of paint, gouache has been used on some unusual papers or surfaces.[4]

One variation of the medium is gouaches découpées created by Henri Matisse, cut paper collages. His Blue Nudes series is a good example of the technique.

See also

Notes

[p] - The word "gouache" is pronounced "gwash";[5] the alternate term "body color" is sometimes one word "bodycolor" also "opaque watercolor".
  1. ^ Marjorie B. Cohn, Wash and Gouache, Fogg Museum, 1977.
  2. ^ Mayer, Ralph. The Artist's Handbook of Materials and Techniques, Viking Adult; 5th revised and updated edition, 1991. ISBN 0-670-83701-6
  3. ^ Adolf Dehn, Water Color, Gouache Studio Publishing 1955. ISBN 0-670-75110-3
  4. ^ Vienna Parreno has painted on Braille paper. ""Beyond Retinal Titillation: Seeing Red: Blog: Vienna Parreno"". http://viennaparreno.wordpress.com/2008/07/21/beyond-retinal-titillation/. Retrieved 2008-07-23.  
  5. ^ "Gouache - MSN Encarta", MSN Encarta, 2009, web: Encarta-8754. Archived 2009-10-31.

References

External links

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Study guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiversity

Gouache paints come in many colors and are usually mixed with water to achieve the desired working properties and to control the opacity when dry.

Gouache[p](Template:IPA-en; Template:IPA-fr), the name of which derives from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash or bodycolor (the term preferred by art historians) is a type of paint consisting of pigment suspended in water. Gouache differs from watercolor in that the particles are larger, the ratio of pigment to water is much higher, and an additional, inert, white pigment such as chalk is also present. Like all watermedia, it is diluted with water. (Gum Arabic is also present as a binding agent, just as in watercolor.) This makes gouache heavier and more opaque, with greater reflective qualities.[1]

Contents

History

A premiere, Anders Zorn
Self-portrait, Friedrich Schwinge.

"Guazzo" was originally a term applied to the early 16th century practice of applying oil paint over a tempera base.[2] The term was applied to the watermedia in the 18th century in France, although the technique is considerably older. It was used as early as the 14th century in Europe.

Application

Gouache generally dries to a different value than it appears when wet (lighter tones generally dry darker, while darker tones tend to dry lighter), which can make it difficult to match colors over multiple painting sessions. This, combined with its quick coverage and total hiding power, mean that gouache lends itself to more immediate techniques than watercolor.[3] "En plein air" paintings take advantage of this, as do works of J.M.W. Turner and Victor Lensner. It is used most consistently by commercial artists for works such as posters, illustrations, comics, and for other design work. For example, comics illustrators like Alex Ross use mostly gouache for their work. Industrial Designer and Visual Futurist Syd Mead also works primarily in gouache. Most 20th-century animations used it to create an opaque color on a cel with watercolor paint used for backgrounds, and gouache as "poster paint" is desirable for its speed and durability.

As with all types of paint, gouache has been used on some unusual papers or surfaces.[4]

One variation of the medium is gouaches découpées created by Henri Matisse, cut paper collages. His Blue Nudes series is a good example of the technique.

See also

  • Decalcomania
  • Aquapasto

Notes

Template:Refbegin

[p] - The word "gouache" is pronounced "gwash";[5] the alternate term "body color" is sometimes one word "bodycolor" also "opaque watercolor".
  1. Marjorie B. Cohn, Wash and Gouache, Fogg Museum, 1977.
  2. Mayer, Ralph. The Artist's Handbook of Materials and Techniques, Viking Adult; 5th revised and updated edition, 1991. ISBN 0-670-83701-6
  3. Adolf Dehn, Water Color, Gouache Studio Publishing 1955. ISBN 0-670-75110-3
  4. Vienna Parreno has painted on Braille paper. "Beyond Retinal Titillation: Seeing Red: Blog: Vienna Parreno". Retrieved on 2008-07-23.
  5. "Gouache - MSN Encarta", MSN Encarta, 2009, web: Encarta-8754. Archived 2009-10-31.

Template:Refend

References

Template:Refbegin

Template:Refend

External links

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
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