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Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media: Wikis

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The Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media has been awarded since 1988. From 1988 to 1999 it was called the Grammy Award for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television. The award is presented to the songwriter(s).

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Contents

1980s

30th Grammy Awards (1988)

31st Grammy Awards (1989)

1990s

32nd Grammy Awards (1990)

33rd Grammy Awards (1991)

34th Grammy Awards (1992)

35th Grammy Awards (1993)

36th Grammy Awards (1994)

37th Grammy Awards (1995)

38th Grammy Awards (1996)

39th Grammy Awards (1997)

40th Grammy Awards (1998)

41st Grammy Awards (1999)

2000s

42nd Grammy Awards (2000)

43rd Grammy Awards (2001)

44th Grammy Awards (2002)

45th Grammy Awards (2003)

46th Grammy Awards (2004)

47th Grammy Awards (2005)

48th Grammy Awards (2006)

49th Grammy Awards (2007)

50th Grammy Awards (2008)

51st Grammy Awards (2009)

2010s

52nd Grammy Awards (2010)A

^  "The Climb" from Hannah Montana: The Movie and written by Jessi Alexander and Jon Mabe, was originally nominated but was withdrawn by Walt Disney Records because it had not been written specifically for a film as eligibility rules require. NARAS released a statement thanking Disney for its honesty and announcing that "The Climb" had been replaced by "All Is Love", the song with the fifth highest initial votes.[1]

References

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Simple English

The Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media has been awarded since 1988. From 1988 to 1999 it was called the Grammy Award for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television. The award is presented to the songwriter(s).

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

2000s

  • Grammy Awards of 2008
  • Grammy Awards of 2007
  • Grammy Awards of 2006
    • Glen Ballard & Alan Silvestri for "Believe" (from The Polar Express) performed by Josh Groban
  • Grammy Awards of 2005
  • Grammy Awards of 2004
    • Christopher Guest, Eugene Levy & Michael McKean for "A Mighty Wind" (from A Mighty Wind) performed by The Folksmen, Mitch & Mickey & The New Main Street Singers
  • Grammy Awards of 2003
  • Grammy Awards of 2002
  • Grammy Awards of 2001
  • Grammy Awards of 2000
    • Madonna & William Orbit for "Beautiful Stranger" (from Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me) performed by Madonna

1990s

  • Grammy Awards of 1999
  • Grammy Awards of 1998
    • R. Kelly for "I Believe I Can Fly" (from Space Jam)
  • Grammy Awards of 1997
    • Diane Warren for "Because You Loved Me" (Theme from Up Close & Personal) performed by Céline Dion
  • Grammy Awards of 1996
    • Alan Menken & Stephen Schwartz for "Colors of the Wind" (from Pocahontas) performed by Judy Kuhn & Vanessa Williams
  • Grammy Awards of 1995
  • Grammy Awards of 1994
    • Alan Menken & Tim Rice for "A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)" (from Aladdin) performed by Regina Belle & Peabo Bryson
  • Grammy Awards of 1993
    • Howard Ashman & Alan Menken for "Beauty and the Beast" (from Beauty and the Beast) performed by Peabo Bryson & Céline Dion
  • Grammy Awards of 1992
    • Bryan Adams, Michael Kamen & Robert John "Mutt" Lange for "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You" (from Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves) performed by Bryan Adams
  • Grammy Awards of 1991
    • Alan Menken & Howard Ashman for "Under the Sea" (from The Little Mermaid) performed by various artists
  • Grammy Awards of 1990
    • Carly Simon for "Let the River Run" (from Working Girl)

1980s

  • Grammy Awards of 1989
    • Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier for "Two Hearts" (from Buster) performed by Phil Collins
  • Grammy Awards of 1988
    • James Horner, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil for "Somewhere Out There" (from An American Tail) performed by Linda Ronstadt & James Ingram


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