Grand Slam (tennis): Wikis

  
  

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The four Slam tournaments, also called the Majors,[1] are the most important tennis events of the year in terms of world ranking points, tradition, prize-money awarded, and public attention. They are:

A singles player or doubles team that wins all four Slam tournaments in the same year is said to have achieved the Grand Slam. If the player or team wins all four consecutively, but not in the same calendar year, it is called a Non-Calendar Year Grand Slam. Winning all four at some point in a career, even if not consecutively, is referred to as a Career Grand Slam, while winning the four majors and a gold medal in tennis at the Summer Olympics has been called a Golden Slam since 1988, when Steffi Graf accomplished that feat in a single calendar year.

Contents

History

Used in golf since 1930, the term Grand Slam was first applied to tennis by New York Times columnist John Kieran according to Total Tennis, The Ultimate Tennis Encyclopedia by Bud Collins. In the chapter about 1933, Collins writes that after the Australian player Jack Crawford had won the Australian, French, and Wimbledon Championships, speculation arose about his chances in the U.S. Championships. Kieran, who was a bridge player, wrote: "If Crawford wins, it would be something like scoring a grand slam on the courts, doubled and vulnerable." Crawford, an asthmatic, won two of the first three sets of his finals match against Fred Perry, then tired in the heat and lost the last two sets and the match.

Grand Slam (four majors in one calendar year)

Men's singles

Women's singles

Men's doubles

Women's doubles

Mixed doubles

Boys' singles

Non-Calendar year Grand Slam (four consecutive majors regardless of year)

In 1982, the ITF redefined the Grand Slam as four consecutive victories that could span two consecutive years and put up a US$1 million bonus for any player who accomplished the feat.[2] After Martina Navratilova won her fourth consecutive major championship at the 1984 French Open, she was duly awarded the $1 million bonus in recognition of her achievement. Navratilova would go on to win a total of six Grand Slam titles in a row but did not complete the calendar-year Grand Slam. This redefinition of the Grand Slam by the ITF was the source of great controversy in the tennis world and, in the years since, the ITF has distanced itself from the 1982 decision, seemingly reverting to the traditional calendar-year definition of the Grand Slam. No other sources consider this a true Grand Slam.

Women's singles

Women's doubles

  • Pam Shriver and Martina Navratilova(1986-87)
    • Four consecutive titles from 1986 Wimbledon through the 1987 French Open (all with Navratilova).
  • Gigi Fernández and Natasha Zvereva (1992-93)
    • Six consecutive titles from the 1992 French Open through 1993 Wimbledon.
  • Natasha Zvereva (1996-97)
    • Four consecutive titles from the 1996 US Open through 1997 Wimbledon (all with Gigi Fernandez with the exception of 1997 Australian Open won with Martina Hingis).

Most Grand Slam titles in a row (consecutive)

Men's singles

Women's singles

Men's doubles

Team:

Player:

  • 8: Frank Sedgman (from the 1950 US Championships through the 1952 Wimbledon Championships)

Women's doubles

Team:

  • 8: Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver (1983 Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1984 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1985 French Open)
  • 6: Gigi Fernández and Natasha Zvereva (1992 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open, 1993 Australian Open/French Open/Wimbledon Championships)

Player:

  • 6: Martina Navratilova (1985 Australian Open, 1986 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open, 1987 Australian Open/French Open)

Most consecutive Grand Slam singles finals

Note: minimum 4 consecutive finals.

Men

Rank Player # Notes
1 Roger Federer 10 2005 Wimbledon2007 US Open
2 Roger Federer 8 2008 French Open – present
3 Jack Crawford 7 1934 Australian Championships1935 Wimbledon
4 Don Budge 6 1937 Wimbledon1938 U.S. Championships
= Rod Laver 6 1961 Wimbledon1962 U.S. Championships
6 Fred Perry 5 1934 Wimbledon1935 Wimbledon
= Frank Sedgman 5 1951 U.S. Championships1952 U.S. Championships
= Fred Stolle 5 1964 Wimbledon1965 Wimbledon
9 Lew Hoad 4 1956 Australian Championships1956 U.S. Championships
= Rod Laver 4 1969 Australian Open1969 US Open
= Andre Agassi 4 1999 French Open2000 Australian Open

Women

Rank Player # Notes
1 Steffi Graf 13 1987 French Open1990 French Open
2 Martina Navratilova 11 1985 French Open1987 US Open
3 Martina Navratilova 6 1983 Wimbledon Championships1984 US Open
= Chris Evert 6 1984 French Open1985 Wimbledon Championships
= Monica Seles 6 1991 US Open1993 Australian Open
= Margaret Court 6 1969 US Open1971 Australian Open
= Maureen Connolly Brinker 6 1952 Wimbledon Championships – 1953 U.S. Championships
7 Steffi Graf 5 1993 Australian Open1994 Australian Open
= Martina Hingis 5 1997 Australian Open1998 Australian Open
= Margaret Court 5 1963 Wimbledon Championships1964 Wimbledon Championships
= Margaret Court 5 1965 Australian Championships1966 Australian Championships
11 Molla Bjurstedt Mallory 4 1915 U.S. Championships1918 U.S. Championships
= Pauline Betz Addie 4 1941 U.S. Championships1944 U.S. Championships
= Maria Bueno 4 1964 French Championships – 1965 Australian Championships
= Hana Mandlíková 4 1980 US Open1981 Wimbledon Championships
= Martina Navratilova 4 1981 US Open1982 Wimbledon Championships
= Chris Evert 4 1982 Wimbledon Championships1983 French Open
= Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 4 1994 US Open1995 Wimbledon
= Serena Williams 4 2002 French Open2003 Australian Open
= Venus Williams 4 2002 French Open2003 Australian Open
= Justine Henin 4 2006 Australian Open2006 US Open

Most Grand Slam singles titles in a row (non-consecutive)

Helen Wills Moody won all 16 of the Grand Slam singles tournaments she played beginning with the 1924 U.S. Championships and extending through the 1933 Wimbledon Championships (not counting her defaults in the 1926 French and Wimbledon Championships). The first 15 of those were won without losing a set. During this period, she won 6 Wimbledons, 4 French Championships, and 6 U.S. Championships. She also won the 1924 Summer Olympics during this period. Moody never entered the Australian Championships.

Most Grand Slam mixed doubles titles in a row (non-consecutive)

Doris Hart won all 13 of the Grand Slam mixed doubles tournaments she played beginning with the 1951 French Championships and extending through the 1955 U.S. Championships. During this period, she won 5 Wimbledons, 3 French Championships, and 5 U.S. Championships.

Career Grand Slam

Winning all four Grand Slam tournaments during a career is termed a Career Grand Slam. Six men and nine women have accomplished this in singles play, but only three men (Rod Laver, Andre Agassi and Roger Federer) and five women (Margaret Court, Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf and Serena Williams) have won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments at least once since the beginning of the open era.

A number of high-achievement players have failed to achieve the Career Grand Slam because they did not have long careers or because particular tournaments were ill-suited to their games. Björn Borg never won the US Open or the Australian Open. John McEnroe never won the Australian Open or the French Open. Ken Rosewall, Guillermo Vilas, Ivan Lendl, Monica Seles, and Mats Wilander failed to win Wimbledon. John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, Pete Sampras, Martina Hingis and Lindsay Davenport failed to win the French Open, Evonne Goolagong Cawley never won the US Open and Althea Gibson never won the Australian Open.

Venus Williams thus far has failed to win either the Australian Open or the French Open, Justine Henin hasn't won Wimbledon and Rafael Nadal has yet to win the US Open.

The following lists the players who have won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments. The year in which they won their first Grand Slam singles tournament is listed first. The tournaments (or years) needed to complete their first Career Grand Slam were won are then listed. The ages of the players when their Career Grand Slam was completed are shown in square brackets.

Men's singles

Women's singles

Men's doubles

The teams and individual players who won all four Grand Slam doubles tournaments during their careers are listed. The year in which they won their first Grand Slam doubles tournament is listed first. The years in which the tournaments needed to complete the Career Grand Slam were won are then listed.

Male doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam (7):

Women's doubles

Female doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam (13):

Mixed doubles

In the following, the players who won all four Grand Slam mixed doubles tournaments during their careers are listed. (The year in which they won their first Grand Slam mixed doubles tournament is listed first. The years in which the tournaments needed to complete the Career Grand Slam were won are then listed.)

Male doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam:

Female doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam:

Boys singles

Boys doubles

Calendar Year Golden Slam

The term Golden Slam (initially "Golden Grand Slam") was coined in 1988 when Steffi Graf won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments and the singles gold medal in tennis at the Summer Olympics in the same calendar year.[3]

Tennis was not an Olympic sport from 1928 through 1984 (except as a demonstration sport in 1968 and 1984); therefore, many top tennis players from the past never had the chance to complete a Golden Slam. Nevertheless, even with tennis on the Olympics, a Calendar Year Golden Slam could not have been accomplished by any player except Maria Bueno (1960) and Martina Navratilova/Pam Shriver (1984).

Career Golden Slam

A player who wins all four Grand Slam tournaments and the Olympic Gold Medal during his or her career is said to have achieved a Career Golden Slam.

  • Singles players who won a Career Golden Slam (a Singles Career Grand Slam plus the Olympic Gold Medal in Singles):
    • Steffi Graf (1988 French Open, 1988 Australian Open, 1988 Wimbledon, 1988 Olympic Gold Medal (Women's Singles) & 1988 US Open)
      • Steffi Graf's Golden Slam is also a Calendar Year Golden Slam as she won all four Grand Slams and the Olympic Gold Medal all in the same calendar year of 1988.
    • Andre Agassi (1992 Wimbledon, 1994 US Open, 1995 Australian Open, 1996 Olympic Gold Medal (Men's Singles) & 1999 French Open)
  • Doubles teams that won a Career Golden Slam (a Doubles Team Career Grand Slam & the Olympic Gold Medal in Doubles):

Three Slams

Players who have won three of the four Grand Slam tournaments in the same year.

Men's singles

  • Jack Crawford
    • 1933: Australian, French & Wimbledon Championships
  • Fred Perry
    • 1934: Australian, Wimbledon & U.S. Championships
  • Tony Trabert
    • 1955: French, Wimbledon & U.S. Championships
  • Lew Hoad
    • 1956: Australian, French & Wimbledon Championships
  • Ashley Cooper
    • 1958: Australian, Wimbledon & U.S. Championships
  • Roy Emerson
    • 1964: Australian, Wimbledon & U.S. Championships
  • Jimmy Connors
    • 1974: Australian, Wimbledon & US Open
  • Mats Wilander
    • 1988: Australian, French & US Open
  • Roger Federer
    • 2004: Australian, Wimbledon & US Open
    • 2006: Australian, Wimbledon & US Open
    • 2007: Australian, Wimbledon & US Open

Women's singles

  • Helen Wills
    • 1928: French Championships, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
    • 1929: French Championships, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
  • Margaret Court - also winner of a Calendar Year Grand Slam in 1970
    • 1962: Australian, French, & U.S. Championships
    • 1965: Australian, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
    • 1969: Australian, French, & US Open
    • 1973: Australian, French, & US Open
  • Billie Jean King
    • 1972: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Martina Navratilova - won six consecutive Grand Slam titles in 1983-84
    • 1983: Wimbledon, US Open, & Australian Open
    • 1984: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Steffi Graf - also winner of a Calendar Year Grand Slam in 1988, a Calendar Year Golden Slam in 1988, and a Non-Calendar Year Grand Slam (ending with the 1994 Australian Open)
    • 1989: Australian Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 1993: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 1995: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 1996: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Monica Seles
    • 1991: Australian Open, French Open, & US Open
    • 1992: Australian Open, French Open, & US Open
  • Martina Hingis
    • 1997: Australian Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Serena Williams - winner of a Non-Calendar Year Grand Slam after winning the 2003 Australian Open
    • 2002: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open

Men's doubles

  • Jacques Brugnon
    • 1928: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • John Van Ryn
    • 1931: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Jack Crawford
    • 1935: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • John Bromwich
    • 1950: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Ken McGregor
    • 1952: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • Frank Sedgman
    • 1952: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • Ken Rosewall
    • 1953: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
    • 1956: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Lew Hoad
    • 1953: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
    • 1956: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Tony Roche
    • 1967: Australian Championships, French Championships, U.S. Championships
  • John Newcombe
    • 1967: Australian Championships, French Championships, U.S. Championships
    • 1973: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Anders Järryd
    • 1987: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
    • 1991: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • John Fitzgerald
    • 1991: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Jacco Eltingh
    • 1998: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon

Women's doubles

  • Margaret Osborne duPont
    • 1946: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1949: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Louise Brough Clapp
    • 1946: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1949: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1950: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Doris Hart
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Shirley Fry Irvin
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Althea Gibson
    • 1957: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Darlene Hard
    • 1962: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Lesley Turner Bowrey
    • 1964: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • Nancy Richey Gunter
    • 1966: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Betty Stove
    • 1972: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Margaret Court
    • 1973: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Virginia Wade
    • 1973: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Helen Gourlay Cawley
    • 1977: Australian Open (January), Wimbledon, Australian Open (December)
  • Martina Navratilova
    • 1982: French Open, Wimbledon, Australian Open
    • 1983: Wimbledon, US Open, Australian Open
    • 1986: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
    • 1987: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Pam Shriver
    • 1983: Wimbledon, US Open, Australian Open
    • 1987: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Helena Suková
    • 1990: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
  • Gigi Fernández
    • 1992: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
    • 1993: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1994: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
  • Natasha Zvereva
    • 1992: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
    • 1993: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1994: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1997: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
  • Jana Novotná
    • 1990: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1998: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Virginia Ruano Pascual
    • 2004: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Paola Suárez
    • 2004: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Serena Williams
    • 2009: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Venus Williams
    • 2009: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open

Mixed doubles

  • Eric Sturgess
    • 1949: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Frank Sedgman
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Doris Hart
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Vic Seixas
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Margaret Court
    • 1964: Australian Championships, French Championships, U.S. Championships
    • 1969: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Billie Jean King
    • 1967: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Marty Riessen
    • 1969: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Bob Hewitt
    • 1979: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Martina Navratilova
    • 1985: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Mark Woodforde
    • 1992: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open

Boys' singles

  • Mark Kratzman
    • 1984: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Nicolas Pereira
    • 1988: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Gaël Monfils
    • 2004: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon

Girls' singles

Boys' doubles

Girls' doubles

Career "Boxed Set"

Another Grand Slam-related accomplishment is winning a "boxed set" of Grand Slam titles – winning the singles, doubles, and mixed doubles at all four Grand Slam events.

The top men's singles players have played comparatively few doubles, and very few mixed doubles. Three women have completed the "boxed set" during their careers:

Serena Williams has come closer than any other currently active player to joining this elite group. She is yet to win the mixed doubles at the Australian and French opens (finishing as the runner-up at the 1999 Australian Open and 1998 French Open)

See also

References

External links


Simple English

The four Grand Slam tournaments, also known as The Majors. Are the most important tennis tournaments within the calender year, due to the world ranking points, tradition, prize-money, and public attention.

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