The Full Wiki

Gregory Balestrero: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gregory Balestrero

Gregory Balestrero is an American industrial engineer, and current President and CEO of the Project Management Institute. He has a record of overseeing administrative, financial and internal affairs for professional associations.[1]

Contents

Biography

Balestrero earned a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.[2] From 1994 to 2002, he served as executive director of the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), an organization for construction professionals in non-residential building construction, based in Alexandria, Virginia USA. He previously held the position of executive director at the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE)[3], headquartered in Norcross, GA, where he has been serving as acting executive director since 1987.[4] Since 2002 he is President and CEO of the Project Management Institute.

Balestrero served as the 2003-2004 Board Chairman of the Greater Washington Society of Association Executives (GWSAE) and an active member and former president of the Council of Engineering and Scientific Society Executives (CESSE). Balestrero also is a member of the Committee of 100, of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. He is a current member of the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), where he serves on the Board of Directors for ASAE’s Center for Association Leadership (CAL); the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE); and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).[1]

Balestrero was honored with a fellowship in the World Academy of Productivity Scientists and is an honorary member of Alpha Pi Mu, an industrial engineering honor society. In 2004 he received China's 2004 Friendship Award at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.[5]

Project Management Institute

Gregory Balestrero moved to the Project Management Institute (PMI), when in 2002 he became its president and CEO. He succeeded Virgil R. Carter, former executive director of the Institute. Balestrero continued the rapid expansion started during Carter's tenure,[6] almost tripling the number of members in seven years. His two primary goals for PMI are: building a superior project management practice and gaining global acceptance for the profession. During his tenure, PMI has grown from 93,000 in 2002 to over 260,000 members in 2008 in over 150 countries worldwide.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c NASA Project Management Challenge 2007.. Accessed 2 Dec 2008.
  2. ^ Who's who in engineering Engineers Joint Council, American Association of Engineering Societies, 1991. p.119.
  3. ^ American Society of Agricultural Engineers (1990). Agricultural Engineering. p.17.
  4. ^ Society for Non-destructive Testing (1988). Materials Evaluation. v.46 1988 Jan-Jun. p. 816.
  5. ^ "China's 2004 Friendship Award Presented to PMI's Gregory Balestrero". In: Business Wire, Oct 4, 2004.
  6. ^ While president, Carter brought about a 350% increase in membership, as well as major financial growth. See "ASME names new executive director" in: ASME news May 2002.

External links

Advertisements

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

This decade holds many changes for the United States, but the greatest needs regarding America's needs regarding America's productivity in the 1990s, are better education and employee training.

Gregory Balestrero is an American industrial engineer, and current President and CEO of the Project Management Institute.

Sourced

  • This decade holds many changes for the United States, but the greatest needs regarding America's needs regarding America's productivity in the 1990s, are better education and employee training.
  • American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Society for Integrated Manufacturing (1990). Manufacturing Review v.3 no.1-3 1990. p.131.
  • Employees cannot become more productive in every sense of the word unless they are provided with continuous on-the-job training.
  • NACE International (1990). Materials Performance. p. 104.
  • Companies have a responsibility to train and retrain their employees.
  • Graduating Engineer. v.12 1990/1991 McGraw-Hill, 1990. p.14.
  • Great leaders recognize that companies must innovate to remain competitive, and they nurture environments that encourage creative thinking. Innovation is rarely accidental — it takes an organizational commitment that starts at the executive level. The idea is not enough. As Thomas Edison said, innovation is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration. Too often companies forget the ‘perspiration’ or execution part of the equation.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message