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HNK Hajduk Split
Hajduk's Logo
Full name Hrvatski nogometni klub Hajduk Split
Nickname(s) Bili (The Whites)
Majstori s mora (Masters from the Sea)
Founded 13 February 1911
Ground Gradski stadion u Poljudu
(Capacity: 35,000)
Chairman Croatia Joško Svaguša
Manager Croatia Stanko Poklepović
League Prva HNL
2008–09 Prva HNL, 2nd
Home colours
Away colours
Current season

HNK Hajduk Split is a Croatian football club, one of two most popular football clubs in the country.[1][2] Hajduk is based in the city of Split, Croatia.

Contents

History

The club was founded in the famous, centuries old pub U Fleků in Prague (then also a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire) by a group of students from Split: Fabijan Kaliterna, Lucijan Stella, Ivan Šakić and Vjekoslav Ivanišević. They attended the pub following a match between AC Sparta and SK Slavia and decided it was time their own town founded its professional club. They all knew how popular the sport was in Split (their home), and how well their friends there played.

The club was officially registered with the authorities on February 13, 1911. The name originates from the hajduks, romanticized bandits that fought the Ottoman Turks. The founders subsequently designed the club's emblem, and a group of Catholic nuns from a monastery in Split created copies which were distributed to fans.[3]

Hajduk gathered the pro-Croat party of citizens of Split, Croat unionists or puntari. That is why the club specifically has the name "hrvatski nogometni klub" (Croatian football club) and has the Croatian coat-of-arms in its logo. The club itself was against the Austro-Hungarian government's policy of not allowing the unification of Croatian provinces and keeping them separated (the government and the emperor did not allow the reunion of Dalmatia with the rest of Croatia). Hajduk reached its first period of glory in the late twenties, when it won two Yugoslav championships, breaking the domination of clubs from Belgrade and Zagreb. Particularly interesting is the club's war episode. After the Italian occupation of Split during World War II, the club ceased to compete in defiance, and declined an offer to join the Italian first division, which included the incentive of a new stadium being built by the authorities and presented to the club free of charge.

In 1944, the team and staff clandestinely joined Josip Broz Tito's Yugoslav Partisans on the island Vis and continued to play as an official Partisan army team. With its proficiency and its unique Dalmatian spirit, the club reportedly impressed the Partisan commander and future Yugoslav president, Marshal Josip Broz Tito. He officially invited Hajduk to move to Belgrade and become an official Yugoslav People's Army (JNA) team. However, Hajduk's players refused this offer and continued playing in their hometown, Split. The club, however, continued to enjoy the reputation of "Tito's favorite" long after the war. Hajduk had its best years in SFR Yugoslavia, particularly the 1970s. The so-called "Zlatna generacija" ("Golden Generation") won five consecutive cups and three championships in the 1972 to 1979 period. It was the third most successful club in Yugoslavia far outstripping the fourth, its present day rival, NK Dinamo. In the summer of 1991, Hajduk restored its traditional emblem including the Croatian chequy and removed the red star from it.[4]

Since 1979, Hajduk have played at the Poljud stadium. It was built by the SFR Yugoslav Federal Government for the 1979 Mediterranean games that were held in Split. Thanks to lavish federal funding, the stadium is quite impressive, not so much in size (though it is large) as it is in architecture, having one of the most distinctive and beautiful designs in the world at the time of its construction. In the SFR Yugoslavia, Hajduk was a team that had supporters all over the country, among all national and religious communities, not only among the Croats. It is important to mention the big popularity of Hajduk among Albanians in Yugoslavia, especially in Kosovo, where the popularity of Hajduk can be compared with that in Dalmatia.

Modern club

Hajduk is famous for its youth school. It is one of the most prolific producers of high quality footballers which often continue careers in famous European teams. Some of Hajduk's former players include: Alen Bokšić (ex Juventus, Lazio, Middlesbrough), Robert Jarni (ex Juventus, Betis, Real Madrid), Slaven Bilić (ex Karlsruhe, Everton), Igor Štimac (ex West Ham, Derby County), Milan Rapaić (Perugia, Fenerbahçe, Standard Liege), Igor Tudor (Juventus), Ivica Šurjak (ex Paris SG), Luka Peruzović (ex Anderlecht), Aljoša Asanović (ex Derby County, Panathinaikos), Ivan Buljan (ex Hamburger SV) and Zlatko Vujović (ex Bordeaux).

When the Croatian national team won third place at the 1998 World Cup in France, amongst the first 11, there were 5 former Hajduk players.

Before that, Hajduk played its games at the "Kod stare plinare" stadium ("By the old gas facility"), also known as "Stari Plac Stadion" ("Old Square") or "Staro Hajdukovo" ("Old Hajduk's"). Before the transformation that area into the football pitch, the area was known as "Kraljeva njiva" ("King's Field") and it was part of a military camp.

The fans are called Torcida (since 1950) as they took their name after their idolized Brazilian fan groups, which are named torcidas, from the Portuguese 'torcer', to cheer on. Supporters popularly call the players of Hajduk bili (dialect for 'bijeli', plural form of white) and are the oldest organized supporters' group in Europe.

Hajduk is by far the most popular sport team in the Croatian region of Dalmatia. Hajduk also has a strong fan base throughout the rest of Croatia, especially in litoral areas, as well as in Slavonia. Hajduk is also a very important part of the region's identity.

Outside of Croatia, Hajduk also has many supporters throughout the rest of the world. It is said that Hajduk has never played a single game anywhere in the world without at least a small group of Torcida in the stands. Countries with huge fan clubs membership include Brazil, Chile New Zealand, Australia, Switzerland, USA and Canada - mostly countries with significant Croat immigration from Dalmatia.

Honours

Hajduk won two Kingdom of Yugoslavia championships, seven Yugoslav championships, six Croatian championships, as well as nine Yugoslav Cup titles, four Croatian Cups and five super cups. Abroad, the club has reached the quarterfinals of the Champions Cup (now UEFA Champions League) three times (last time 1995), and two European semifinals: Cup Winners' Cup 1973, and UEFA Cup 1984.

1941[5], 1946[5], 1992, 1993-94, 1994-95, 2000-01, 2003-04, 2004-05
1927, 1929, 1950, 1952, 1954-55, 1970-71, 1973-74, 1974-75, 1978-79
1993, 1995, 2000, 2003
1967, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1984, 1987, 1991
1992, 1993, 1994, 2004, 2005

European record

Summary

Competition Pld W D L GF GA Last season played
European Cup / UEFA Champions League 40 18 10 12 58 47 2005–06
UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League 76 36 17 23 128 77 2008–09
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 30 10 3 17 31 46 1993–94
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 4 2 0 2 5 4 1970–71
Total 150 66 30 52 222 174

Source: uefa.com, Last updated on 20 April 2009
Pld = Matches played; W = Matches won; D = Matches drawn; L = Matches lost; GF = Goals for; GA = Goals against. Defunct competitions indicated in italics.

1960s–1980

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Agg.
1967–68 Cup Winners' Cup R1 England Tottenham Hotspur 0–2 3–4 3–6
1970–71 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup R1 Bulgaria Slavia Sofia 3–0 0–1 3–1
R2 Portugal Vitória Setúbal 2–1 0–2 2–3
1971–72 European Cup R1 Spain Valencia 1–1 0–0 1–1
1972–73 Cup Winners' Cup R1 Norway Fredrikstad FK 1–0 1–0 2–0
R2 Wales Wrexham 2–0 1–3 3–3
QF Scotland Hibernian 3–0 2–4 5–4
SF England Leeds United 0–0 0–1 0–1
1974–75 European Cup R1 Iceland Keflavík 7–1 2–0 9–1
R2 France Saint-Étienne 4–1 1–5 5–6
1975–76 European Cup R1 Malta Floriana 3–0 5–0 8–0
R2 Belgium Molenbeek 4–0 3–2 7–2
QF Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 2–0 0–3 2–3
1976–77 Cup Winners' Cup R1 Belgium Lierse 3–0 0–1 3–1
R2 Spain Atlético Madrid 1–2 0–1 1–3
1977–78 Cup Winners' Cup R1 Republic of Ireland Dundalk 4–0 0–1 4–1
R2 Hungary Diósgyőri VTK 2–1 1–2 3–3
QF Austria Austria Vienna 1–1 1–1 2–2
1978–79 UEFA Cup R1 Austria Rapid Vienna 2–0 1–2 4–1
R2 England Arsenal 2–1 0–1 2–2
1979–80 European Cup R1 Turkey Trabzonspor 1–0 1–0 2–0
R2 Denmark Vejle 1–2 3–0 4–2
QF Germany Hamburger SV 3–2 0–1 3–3

1980–1990

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Agg.
1981–82 UEFA Cup R1 Germany VfB Stuttgart 3–1 2–2 5–3
R2 Belgium Beveren 1–2 3–2 4–4
R3 Spain Valencia 4–1 1–5 5–6
1982–83 UEFA Cup R1 Malta Zurrieq 4–0 4–1 8–1
R2 France Bordeaux 4–1 0–4 4–5
1983–84 UEFA Cup R1 Romania Universitatea Craiova 1–0 0–1 1–1
R2 Hungary Budapest Honvéd 3–0 2–3 5–3
R3 Serbia Radnički Niš 2–0 2–0 4–0
QF Czech Republic Sparta Prague 2–0 0–1 2–1
SF England Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 0–1 2–2
1984–85 Cup Winners' Cup R1 Russia Dynamo Moscow 2–5 0–1 2–6
1985–86 UEFA Cup R1 France Metz 5–1 2–2 7–3
R2 Italy Torino 3–1 1–1 4–2
R3 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 2–0 1–0 3–0
QF Belgium KSV Waregem 1–0 0–1 1–1
1986–87 UEFA Cup R1 Greece OFI Crete 4–0 0–1 4–1
R2 Bulgaria Trakia Plovdiv 3–1 2–2 5–3
R3 Scotland Dundee United 0–0 0–2 0–2
1987–88 Cup Winners' Cup R1 Denmark Aalborg BK 1–0 0–1 1–1
R2 France Marseille 0–4 0–3* 0–7

1990–2000

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Agg.
1991–92 Cup Winners' Cup R1 England Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 0–2 1–2
1993–94 Cup Winners' Cup R1 Netherlands Ajax 1–0 0–6 1–6
1994–95 Champions League QR Poland Legia Warsaw 4–0 1–0 5–0
Group
C
Portugal Benfica 0–0 1–2
Romania Steaua Bucharest 1–4 1–0
Belgium Anderlecht 2–1 0–0
QF Netherlands Ajax 0–0 0–3 0–3
1995–96 Champions League QR Greece Panathinaikos 1–1 0–0 1–1
1996–97 UEFA Cup PR Moldova Zimbru 2–1 4–0 6–1
QR Russia Torpedo Moscow 1–0 0–2 1–2
1997–98 UEFA Cup QR1 Luxembourg CS Grevenmacher 2–0 4–1 6–1
QR2 Sweden Malmö FF 3–2 2–0 5–2
R1 Germany Schalke 04 2–3 0–2 2–5
1998–99 UEFA Cup QR2 Sweden Malmö FF 1–1 2–1 3–2
R1 Italy Fiorentina 0–0 1–2 1–2
1999–2000 UEFA Cup QR Luxembourg F91 Dudelange 5–0 1–1 6–1
R1 Bulgaria Levski Sofia 0–0 0–3 0–3

2000–present

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Agg.
2000–01 Champions League QR2 Hungary Dunaferr 0–2 2–2 2–4
2001–02 Champions League QR2 Hungary Ferencváros 0–0 0–0 0–0 (6–5 p)
QR3 Spain Mallorca 1–0 0–2 1–2
UEFA Cup R1 Poland Wisła Kraków 2–2 0–1 2–3
2002–03 UEFA Cup QR Faroe Islands GÍ Gøta 3–0 8–0 11–0
R1 England Fulham 0–1 2–2 2–3
2003–04 UEFA Cup QR Finland FC Haka 1–0 1–2 2–2
R1 Switzerland Grasshopper 0–0 1–1 1–1
R2 Italy Roma 1–1 0–1 1–2
2004–05 Champions League QR2 Republic of Ireland Shelbourne 3–2 0–2 3–4
2005–06 Champions League QR2 Hungary Debrecen 0–5 0–3 0–8
2007–08 UEFA Cup QR1 Montenegro Budućnost Podgorica 1–0 1–1 2–1
QR2 Italy Sampdoria 0–1 1–1 1–2
2008–09 UEFA Cup QR1 Malta Birkirkara 4–0 3–0 7–0
QR2 Spain Deportivo La Coruña 0–2 0–0 0–2
2009–10 Europa League QR3 Slovakia MŠK Žilina 0–1 1–1 1–2

Note: Hajduk score always listed first.

Current squad

As of 17 March 2010.

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Croatia GK Danijel Subašić
3 Croatia MF Toni Pezo
5 Croatia DF Jurica Buljat
8 Croatia MF Krešo Ljubičić
9 Croatia FW Ahmad Sharbini
10 Bosnia and Herzegovina MF Senijad Ibričić
11 Croatia MF Srđan Andrić (captain)
12 Croatia GK Vjekoslav Tomić
13 Croatia FW Ante Vukušić
14 Croatia MF Marin Tomasov
17 Croatia DF Ivan Strinić
18 Croatia MF Mirko Oremuš
20 Australia MF Josip Skoko (vice-captain)
21 Croatia FW Marko Livaja
22 Croatia DF Mario Maloča
23 Croatia MF Marin Ljubičić
24 Croatia MF Mario Tičinović
No. Position Player
25 Croatia GK Dante Stipica
26 Croatia MF Goran Rubil
27 Croatia DF Matej Jonjić
28 Bosnia and Herzegovina DF Boris Pandža
29 Croatia DF Goran Jozinović
50 Romania MF Florin Cernat
90 Croatia FW Duje Čop
99 Croatia MF Anas Sharbini
Croatia DF Anthony Šerić
Croatia DF Ivo Smoje
Croatia DF Hrvoje Vejić
Croatia MF Marijan Buljat
Croatia DF Ante Aračić
Croatia DF Mladen Pelaić
Croatia MF Dario Jertec
Croatia FW Ivan Rodić
Source: hajduk.hr

Players out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Croatia GK Darko Franić (at Hrvatski Dragovoljac)
Croatia GK Božidar Radošević (at Željezničar until July 2010)
Croatia GK Miro Varvodić (at Köln until July 2010)
Croatia DF Roko Španjić (at Novalja)
Croatia MF Domagoj Barač (at Dugopolje)
Croatia MF Mario Brkljača (at Cagliari)
Croatia MF Tonći Kukoč (at Mosor)
Croatia MF Mislav Leko (at Hrvatski Dragovoljac)
Croatia MF Jure Obšivač (at Dugopolje)
No. Position Player
Croatia MF Niko Peraić (at Raštane)
Croatia MF Ante Režić (at Mosor)
Croatia MF Dinko Trebotić (at Rudeš)
Croatia FW Ante Budimir (at Dugopolje)
Croatia FW Branko Čubrilo (at Solin until July 2010)
Croatia FW Mario Sačer (at Varteks)
Croatia FW Tedi Surać (at RNK Split)
Croatia FW Hrvoje Tokić (at Mosor)
Bosnia and Herzegovina FW Mirko Žaja (at Mosor)

Notable players

Name Nationality Position Hajduk career Appearances Goals
Vladimir Beara Croatia GK 1947–1955 308 0
Ivan Katalinić Croatia GK 1972–1980 195 0
Zoran Simović Montenegro GK 1980–1984 84 0
Ivan Pudar Croatia GK 1979–1990 158 0
Tonči Gabrić Croatia GK 1987-1988/1994–1999 187 0
Stipe Pletikosa Croatia GK 1997-2003/2005-2006 165 4
Slavko Luštica Croatia D 1940–1956 634 86
Luka Peruzović Croatia D 1972–1979/1986-1987 224 19
Vilson Džoni Croatia D 1967–1978 450 24
Dragan Holcer Serbia D 1967–1975 419 9
Ivan Buljan Croatia D 1968–1976 402 58
Vedran Rožić Croatia D 1972–1984 304 ?
Slaven Bilić Croatia D 1989-1993/2000 117 12
Igor Štimac Croatia D 1985-92/1994-95/2001-02 96 7
Igor Tudor Croatia D 1994–1998/2007-2008 66 6
Zoran Vujović Croatia DM 1976–1986 232 38
Robert Jarni Croatia DM 1986-1991 128 17
Ivan Hlevnjak Croatia CM 1962–1973 665 237
Branko Oblak Slovenia CM 1973–1975 66 24
Dražen Mužinić Croatia CM 1971–1980 254 ?
Ivan Gudelj Croatia CM 1979–1986 161 34
Dušan Pešić Serbia MF 1982-1984 156 46
Jiří Sobotka Czech Republic LM 1940–1941 42 28
Bernard Vukas Croatia LM 1947–1957/1959-1962 615 300
Jurica Jerković Croatia LM 1968–1978 ? ?
Aljoša Asanović Croatia LM 1984–1990/1994-1996/2001 150 36
Milan Rapaić Croatia LM 1991-1996/2003 98 23
Niko Kranjčar Croatia LM 2005–2006 50 15
Blaž Slišković Bosnia and Herzegovina RM 1981–1986 101 23
Nikola Gazdić Croatia FW 1913–1921 91 106
Ljubo Benčić Croatia FW 1922–1935 353 355
Frane Matošić Croatia FW 1935–1939/1940-1941/1944-1955 739 729
Vlade Kragić Croatia FW 1929–1940 354 266
Andrija Anković Croatia FW 1958–1967 326 250
Pero Nadoveza Croatia FW 1963–1973 460 296
Slaviša Žungul Croatia FW 1972–1978 303 176
Ivica Šurjak Croatia FW 1971–1981 268 ?
Boriša Đorđević Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia FW 1975–1981 ? ?
Zlatko Vujović Croatia FW 1976–1986 240 101
Alen Bokšić Croatia FW 1987–1991 95 27
Ardian Kozniku Croatia FW 1990–1994 98 44
Nikola Kalinić Croatia FW 2005–2009 58 32
Māris Verpakovskis Latvia FW 2007–2008 18 5

Trivia: in the season 2001, Goran Ivanišević was registered for Hajduk as player.

List of Hajduk managers

  • Czechoslovakia Oldřich Just (1911)
  • Czechoslovakia Josef Šwagrovský (1912)
  • Czechoslovakia Otto Bohata (1913)
  • Czechoslovakia Norbert Zajíček (1914)
  • Czechoslovakia Zdeňek Jahn (1915–1918)
  • Czechoslovakia Karel Šťastný (1919)
  • Czechoslovakia Rudolf Štapl (1920)
  • Czechoslovakia Fraňo Zoubek (1920)
  • Czechoslovakia Franz Mantler (1921)
  • Czechoslovakia Jindřich Šoltis (1922)
  • Czechoslovakia Václav Pinc (1922)
  • Czechoslovakia Jaroslav Bohata (1923)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Luka Kaliterna (1923–1930)
  • Austria Erwin Puschner (1930)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Luka Kaliterna (1930–1936)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Ante Blažević (1936)
  • Czechoslovakia Karel Senecký (1937)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Luka Kaliterna (1937)
  • Hungary Illés Spitz (1938–1939)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Ljubo Benčić (1939–1940)
  • Czechoslovakia Jiří Sobotka (1940)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Ljubo Benčić (1940)
  • Czechoslovakia Jiří Sobotka (1941)
  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia Ljubo Benčić (1941–1948)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Luka Kaliterna (1948–1951)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Branko Bakotić (1951)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Jozo Matošić (1952–1954)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Aleksandar Tomašević (1954–1955)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Ljubo Benčić (1955–1956)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Frane Matošić (1956–1958)
   

References

External links








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